Bachelor Program in Pennsylvania USA

Top Bachelor Programs in Pennsylvania USA 2017

Bachelor

Bachelor degrees from accredited colleges and universities can be important stepping-stones toward a successful career.The most common type of undergraduate program is a bachelor's degree, usually awarded after four years of successful study

A Bachelor is a popular college degree that is pursued by students who want to gain knowledge in a specific area of study. Completed in three to five years, it is available in a variety of study disciplines.

Education in the United States is mainly provided by the public sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: state, local, and federal, in that order. The common requirements to study at a higher education level in United States will include your admissions essay (also known as the statement of purpose or personal statement), transcript of records, recommendation/reference letters, language tests

Pennsylvania is officially known as Common Wealth of Pennsylvania. Most of the higher education institutes in the state follow the commonwealth system of higher education. The easily reachable and healthy recreation facilities in the state make it an ideal place for higher education.

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Bachelor in Theatre

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Theatre Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. Double majors and self-designed majors encouraged Co-curricular experience expected Major in Theatre Exploring the dramatic expression of a given culture through theory and practice. Nine specified courses and up to four electives (41-49 semester hours, typically 11-13 courses). Minor Theatre: at least 24 semester hours of graded courses in theatre. Department Facts Distinctions Fully supported Senior Project requirement proves to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. The Equity Guest Artist Program Collaborative projects with department faculty and staff A practical, hands-on approach in many courses Touring plays Children’s theatre productions Key Benefits Developing practical and creative communication skills—writing, speaking, acting, directing, audio-visual production, and theatre design. Cultivating critical perspectives on a variety of communicative practices and texts, including speech, politics, popular culture, performance, news, drama, film, television, and advertising. Engaging responsible citizenship and thoughtful professionalism through college and beyond. Student Learning Outcomes Mission Statement The Communication Arts and Theatre Department is dedicated to the creative and critical study of communication, with special emphasis on theatre, rhetoric, and media. The curriculum offers opportunities for the performance, practice, in-depth study, and analysis of texts and techniques in each of these spheres. Students engage in production, performance, and critical cultural studies, with the objective of becoming competent and engaged artists/scholars in their fields. The department’s liberal arts emphasis encourages students to develop habits of engaged citizenship, thoughtful professionalism, and a meaningful private life. [-]

Bachelor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies draws upon the course offerings of communication arts, economics, English, history, modern languages, philosophy, political science, psychology, and religious studies. [+]

Bachelor in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies draws upon the course offerings of communication arts, economics, English, history, modern languages, philosophy, political science, psychology, and religious studies. WGSS Major and Minor WOMST Major and Minor New Women’s Studies senior project guidelines have been posted here. Program Facts Distinctions Interdisciplinary program draws on resources of many College departments, permitting flexibility in course selection to accommodate the needs and interests of all students. Fully supported Senior Projects prove to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. Students are actively involved in shaping and guiding the development of the program. Individualized attention and close student-faculty relationships. Collaborative efforts with Women’s Services, Inc., Athena House, and the Ophelia Project reflect the conviction that concerns of women should be addressed both in and out of the classroom. Key Benefits Strong written communication skills, developed by research papers and the Senior Project. Exposure to a variety of disciplines, theories and investigative methods—excellent foundation for graduate school. Critical and analytical thinking skills. Endorsements “Students in women’s studies programs receive an enormous amount of individual attention, far more than they would receive in an ordinary major. The students also receive one or more integrative experiences during their courses that give a special flavor to their work not always found in more traditional subject areas.” — Conclusions of a national study of women’s studies programs produced for the Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences “[Allegheny student interns] are responsible, reliable and very interested in learning.” — Women’s Services, Inc. Learning Outcomes WGSS Content and Theories Students will be able to: Show how critical analysis of gender and sexuality contributes to an understanding of the historical and contemporary formations of patriarchy, heteronormativity, and gender normativity; Achieve a knowledge base about women’s and LGBTQ+ people’s role in history — their contributions, oppression, and resistance; Describe the manner in which race, class, gender, and sexuality intersect; Become aware of women’s and LGBTQ+ people’s experience in cultural contexts, both nationally and globally, including understanding the roles of gender and sexuality in social justice movements around the world; Define and describe a range of theories that underlie feminist and queer analysis, understanding their similarities and differences; Describe how theories reflect the historical and cultural context in which they emerge. Research Methods Students will be able to: Utilize feminist and queer methodological approaches and explain their role in building knowledge; Compare and contrast different feminist and queer theories and methodological approaches; Critique scholarly works from a feminist and queer theoretical and methodological standpoint; Develop a working knowledge of the connections between women’s studies and queer studies scholarship, activism, and social change. Opportunities Co-Curricular Activities The Allegheny College Women’s Center, operated under the aegis of Women’s Studies, offers resources and programs to all Allegheny students, with an emphasis upon programs and materials in feminist theory, historical accounts of women, and contemporary women’s issues. Work-study students assist with program events and help staff the Women’s Center. The Women’s Studies Lecture Series brings noteworthy feminist scholars and contemporary figures to campus in order to raise awareness of women’s issues. Recent events have included a lecture and slide show by the Guerrilla Girls, a lecture and workshop by Tibetan Buddhist Lama Shenpen, a talk on “Women and Islam,” a lecture by the cultural critic Tania Modleski, and a discussion led by Jennifer Baumgartner and Amy Richards, authors of Manifesta. At the end of the spring semester, the Women’s Studies Student Forum celebrates the accomplishments of students who have focused on gender questions in their Senior Projects. First Thursday film series shows full-length documentary and feature films; Third Wednesday series combines viewing of short subjects with lunch and discussion. Clubs Athena House (special interest house): the mission of its residents is to raise awareness within the Allegheny community on issues affecting women’s rights, and to encourage political activism by women and men on campus. Scheduled events include literary circles, game nights, special screenings, and various activist projects. Students Advocating for Reproductive Options (SARO): focuses on questions surrounding women’s reproductive rights, encouraging discussion among broad groups of individuals concerning these issues. SARO has sponsored lectures, film screenings, discussions, and coffeehouse concerts, and was the primary organizer of Allegheny’s delegation to the March to Save Women’s Lives in Washington, D.C. in April 2004. Feminism Amplified, Coalition for Equality (FACE): a feminist group with the goal to raise campus and community awareness about feminist issues Pride Alliance (formerly known as the Committee in Support of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered People): works to create a positive environment for sexual diversity and sponsors events including Coming Out Day, Day of Silence, the Gay Pride Dance, and the Lesbian and Gay Film Series. Recent visitors brought to campus include Gerry Pearlberg and Marilyn Hacker. Internships Students have an opportunity to complete a two-semester internship at a local women’s services or battered women’s shelter that includes intensive certified volunteer training and field research in the service area of their own choosing. A Media Services intern has the opportunity to develop print and web publications for Women’s Studies and assist in events programming. Outstanding Senior Major Prize Awarded for exceptional academic achievement, performance in the seminar, and contribution to the general life of the program. [-]

Bachelor in Psychology

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Psychology is a field of inquiry devoted to understanding human thought and behavior. Although largely concerned with the study of humans, other animals are studied as well, often with specific interest in comparing their behavior to that of humans. Psychology is a blend of paradigms or ways of understanding. Some approaches view psychology as a science, while others emphasize the applied, eclectic nature of the discipline. Psychology has its roots and shares its goals with many neighboring fields such as philosophy, physiology and sociology. The Psychology Department faculty reflects the diverse nature of the discipline by representing a wide range of conceptions and interests in psychology. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Psychology Psychology is a field of inquiry devoted to understanding human thought and behavior. Although largely concerned with the study of humans, other animals are studied as well, often with specific interest in comparing their behavior to that of humans. Psychology is a blend of paradigms or ways of understanding. Some approaches view psychology as a science, while others emphasize the applied, eclectic nature of the discipline. Psychology has its roots and shares its goals with many neighboring fields such as philosophy, physiology and sociology. The Psychology Department faculty reflects the diverse nature of the discipline by representing a wide range of conceptions and interests in psychology. Major & Minor Major The major field program in Psychology leads to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. Students may elect to receive either degree. Both degrees require the completion of at least 44 credits in Psychology. All courses for the Psychology major must be taken for a letter grade. Minor The minor program in Psychology requires the successful completion of a total of five courses (20 semester credit hours) as listed below. All courses for the Psychology minor must be taken for a letter grade. Department Facts Distinctions The fully supported Senior Project, which demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to conduct research and complete a major original assignment. Faculty members who are deeply committed to teaching undergraduates. A large selection of courses for a liberal arts college. Early emphasis on hands-on laboratory work, plus superior undergraduate research facilities. Opportunities for collaborative research, presentations, and publication of research findings with faculty. Key departmental participant in interdisciplinary programs such as the neuroscience major, the women’s studies major and the values, ethics and social action (VESA) minor. Key Benefits Understanding of oneself and others—of human thought and behavior— from a solid foundation in the methods, findings, and concepts of psychology. Excellent preparation for graduate study, as well as excellent focus for a liberal arts program with immediate employment in mind. Ability to design and implement research studies. Ability to synthesize information from different sub-areas of a field. Understanding of psychology’s connections to other fields (neuroscience, philosophy, women’s studies, others). Recognition of the ethical dimensions of psychological research and practice. Ability to evaluate current trends in psychology. Endorsements “After working through the material we began to pinpoint some exciting conclusions, and I began to realize that, at this small college in Meadville, my professor and I were blazing new trails, staking out new territories in the realm of social science.” — Kay Campbell ’93, on her Senior Project Since 1920, Allegheny has ranked in the top 3 percent of all private under-graduate colleges and universities in students going on to earn Ph.D.s in psychology. About 80 percent of Allegheny psychology majors who apply to graduate and professional schools are accepted. Learning Outcomes Our discussion of the goals and objectives for the psychology major begins with a list of the skills and abilities that we view as being particular to students of this discipline. This list of skills and abilities is followed by a description of the particular content areas that we see as being essential to those who graduate from our program. Skills and Abilities Students who successfully complete a major in Psychology should be able to: Evaluate and use current theoretical and research trends in psychology; Design and implement a research study including the development of hypotheses that are testable within the context of acceptable research strategies; Recognize the ethical aspects and implications of psychological research and practice; Synthesize information arising from different sub-areas of psychology; Understand the application of psychology to personal and social issues; Recognize and understand the complexity of sociocultural diversity. Content It should be recognized that skills and content are inseparable. The skills mentioned above must be taught within the context of some content. Nevertheless, it is possible to distinguish between the material that is learned (content) and the processes used to learn and apply the material (skills). Students who successfully complete a major in Psychology should demonstrate: An understanding of the various models of behavior (e.g., psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, biological,etc.); Knowledge of the sub-areas of psychology; Knowledge of various strategies for developing knowledge in psychology; Knowledge of recent trends in psychology; Knowledge of theory in at least one sub-area of psychology [-]

Bachelor in Political Science

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The Department of Political Science is one of the largest of its kind among liberal arts colleges, with ten faculty members offering coursework in American politics, law, and policy, as well as in other world areas including Europe, Latin America, China and East Asia, and the Middle East. The Department also offers courses in international relations and foreign policy, political philosophy, and environmental issues. [+]

Bachelor in Political Science The Department of Political Science is one of the largest of its kind among liberal arts colleges, with ten faculty members offering coursework in American politics, law, and policy, as well as in other world areas including Europe, Latin America, China and East Asia, and the Middle East. The Department also offers courses in international relations and foreign policy, political philosophy, and environmental issues. Political Science Department courses emphasize critical reading and discussion, writing, and independent research. Students often double major in Political Science and other fields, including English, Communication Arts, and Environmental Studies. Political Science is a component of the College’s international studies major (with economics, history, and modern and classical languages). Major At least 45 semester hours, including at least three courses from two of six different subfields: Civic Engagement and Social Action, Culture and Politics, Globalization and Trans-national Politics, Institutions and Processes, Policy Studies, and Problems in Democracy. Minor At least 20 semester hours, including an introductory course and four electives. Department Facts Distinctions A knowledge of enduring issues, gained from exploring values such as freedom, justice, equality, order and power. An understanding of political behavior. An appreciation for U.S. and foreign political institutions and processes. An understanding of public policy and world order. Familiarity with the great texts of 
Western political thought. An ability to accept or refute methodological assumptions and values. Critical thinking skills. Endorsements “When I went to law school, I was well prepared for the experience. I felt prepared and confident because I had learned at Allegheny I could surmount any given challenge.” —Robert A. Marchman ’80, senior vice president, New York Stock Exchange “Allegheny has opened a lot of doors for me. If you’re an Allegheny student, you can go into any discipline you want when you graduate and be successful.” — Carrie Reeves ’73, director, Upward Bound, Case Western Reserve University Outside evaluation teams have praised the department’s effective and innovative curriculum and teaching. One such team noted that Allegheny’s faculty “appreciate the importance of research and the discovery of knowledge.” Several students interning in Washington, D.C. (for example, with the Environmental Protection Agency or the Small Business Administration) have been offered permanent employment “on the spot.” Political science faculty include a winner of the Thoburn Education Foundation Award for Innovative Teaching, one of eleven Allegheny faculty members to be so honored. Each year, a junior or senior attends conferences held by the Center for Study of the Presidency and the Air Force Academy Assembly. Allegheny political science majors applying to graduate and professional school have a 90 percent acceptance rate. Since 1929, the department has ranked in the top 4 percent among private undergraduate institutions in production of eventual Ph.D.s. Learning Outcomes Values Students will value the rights and responsibilities which spring from membership in a democratic political community. Students will appreciate the diversity of values and beliefs that constitute different political traditions. Knowledge Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic political institutions and processes that shape both domestic and global politics. Students will be able to apply disciplinary knowledge to critically assess important public issues. Students will understand theoretical approaches to the study of power, authority, and justice. Skills Students will be able to critically examine political phenomena, evaluate conflicting arguments, assemble and present empirical evidence, make reasoned conclusions from that evidence, and connect these conclusions to theoretical paradigms and/or practical experiences and considerations. Students will be prepared to engage in informed, literate conversations, both written and oral, regarding important political issues. Opportunities Experiential Learning Internships: Many internships have been established with local agencies and individuals; each provides job experience as well as the potential to earn academic credit. Students may also arrange internships independently or through the Career Education Office located in the Allegheny Gateway. As an example, a student recently participated in the White House Internship Program, working in the Public Liaison Office. Washington Semester at American University or Washington Center: Participants study source materials and government institutions while gaining internship experience in the nation’s capital. Other Special Opportunities The Center for Political Participation (CPP) plans and supports events that encourage political participation; top students are chosen to help run the center. Many co-curricular opportunities, including Allegheny Student Government, Young Democrats, College Republicans, World Issues Forum, Debate Team, and Amnesty International. Pi Sigma Alpha annually grants an award for the best oral presentation of a Senior Project. Student-run mock conventions, elections, U.S. Supreme Court. Newly renovated Pelletier Library is a U.S. Government and Pennsylvania document depository (over 250,000 documents). Meadville is a county seat; many students are involved in local or state government agencies. [-]

Bachelor in Physics

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Allegheny’s physics curriculum offers academic possibilities as varied and individual as the students themselves. Choosing from a pure physics curriculum or one of several interdisciplinary emphases, students select courses to meet their own interests and goals. Graduates of the program have become doctors, engineers, lawyers, professors, software designers, and research scientists with placements including the Central Intelligence Agency and NASA. Physics students experience the camaraderie of a supportive department that offers opportunities for close collaboration with faculty in cutting-edge research. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Physics Allegheny’s physics curriculum offers academic possibilities as varied and individual as the students themselves. Choosing from a pure physics curriculum or one of several interdisciplinary emphases, students select courses to meet their own interests and goals. Graduates of the program have become doctors, engineers, lawyers, professors, software designers, and research scientists with placements including the Central Intelligence Agency and NASA. Physics students experience the camaraderie of a supportive department that offers opportunities for close collaboration with faculty in cutting-edge research. The Program Allegheny’s physics majors develop strong backgrounds in theoretical, experimental and computational physics, as well as a thorough understanding of the scientific method and an appreciation of the way the natural universe works. They are also encouraged to explore the impact of physics on the other sciences. Double and student-designed majors are encouraged. Recently, double majors in physics/chemistry, physics/environmental science, and physics/mathematics have been especially popular. Student-designed programs may include emphases such as physics and biology, and physics and music. The physics department also offers a physics minor and an astronomy minor. Dual Bachelor’s Degree Allegheny has dual-degree programs with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, University of Pittsburgh, and Washington University (Missouri)—all known for the excellence of their engineering departments. Participants earn two bachelor’s degrees in five years. Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree A cooperative program with Columbia University allows students to earn a bachelor’s degree from Allegheny in four years and a master of science degree from Columbia after two additional years. Department Facts Endorsements Since 1920, Allegheny has ranked in the top 7 percent among private undergraduate institutions in production of students who eventually receive physics Ph.D.s. “Hardly a day goes by that I don’t fall back on skills that were sharpened at Allegheny. I’m satisfied that I did the best thing by having a broad background.” 
— Ben Burtt ’70, winner of four Academy Awards, two for sound design for Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark and two for sound effects editing for ET and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade “I had a definite advantage when I started graduate school. I had worked with laser optics and quantum mechanics at Allegheny. The faculty there were surprised by what I already knew.” 
— Tom M. Brown ’89 “Allegheny’s physics department prepared me well for my career at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab. I received extensive theoretical and technical knowledge through hands-on research as well as personal interactions with professors.” 
— Danielle Wesolek ’00 Student Learning Outcomes Majors By the time he or she graduates a student majoring in physics at Allegheny should: Demonstrate physical intuition and strong analytical and problem-solving skills. Have a broad understanding of the fundamentals of physics, the connections between the different areas of physics and the limitations of each, Be able to design and carry-out an independent research project, Understand the societal impacts, both positive and negative, of science and technology, Appreciate physics as a valuable human endeavor Minors By the time he or she graduates a student minoring in physics at Allegheny should: Demonstrate physical intuition coupled with strong analytical and problem- solving skills, Have a broad understanding of the fundamentals of physics, the connections between the different areas of physics and the limitations of each, Understand the societal impacts, both positive and negative, of science and technology, Appreciate physics as a valuable human endeavor. Humanities and Social Science Majors Students not majoring in the Natural Sciences who take physics courses should: Appreciate physics as a valuable human endeavor, Understand the connection and interplay between theory and experiment, Appreciate the methods of experimental science if taking a lab course. Opportunities Lectures Nationally recognized experts regularly visit campus to lecture on topics of current interest. Two lectureship programs are endowed. Research Abroad Research experience in Budapest, Hungary each summer with Dr. David Statman. Summer Research/Internships With the assistance and support of the department, many of our students obtain paid summer employment in a research environment. In recent years, students have worked at: Argonne National Laboratory; Fermi National Laboratory; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Air Force Radio-Biological Laboratory; Naval Research Laboratory; F.S. Seiler Research Lab (USAF); Cornell National Supercomputer Facility Allegheny also offers opportunities for summer research with faculty. Professional Societies American Physical Society (APS): both faculty and students present research papers at national and regional meetings. American Association of Physics Teachers Sigma Xi: student forum for presentation of research projects Society of Physics Students: student-run organization with a goal to increase interest in physics among the community and campus alike, as well as aid students in physics-related areas Optical Society of America International Planetarium Society American Chemical Society American Association for the Advancement of Science Awards The department awards prizes for the best Senior Project, the best Senior Project in experimental physics, and outstanding work by a major through the junior year. [-]

Bachelor in Philosophy

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Philosophy has traditionally sought answers to these and other questions through the proper use of rational thought, the application of human intellect to the mysteries of the world around us. Religions have looked for the answers in human connection with the divine, the power that creates and directs the human world and interacts with human beings in community. [+]

Bachelor in Philosophy Philosophy and Religious Studies are two different ways of approaching the most fundamental questions about human existence: How do we relate to the world around us? What can we be sure of? Is there some basic truth that holds all other truths together? Philosophy has traditionally sought answers to these and other questions through the proper use of rational thought, the application of human intellect to the mysteries of the world around us. Religions have looked for the answers in human connection with the divine, the power that creates and directs the human world and interacts with human beings in community. Philosophy Video: The field of Religious Studies is concerned with all forms and manifestations of religious faith in world culture, past and present. Both Philosophy and Religious Studies give students the opportunity to examine some of the most fundamental issues in a liberal education, and so provide a basis for life-long learning. Religious Studies Video: Learning Outcomes Philosophy and Religious Studies Learning Outcomes for Majors and Minors Student Learning Outcomes for Majors in Religious Studies Students who successfully complete a major in Religious Studies should be able to: Recognize and identify similarities and differences among various historical religious cultures and communities, and the meaning of those similarities and differences for the religious beliefs and practices of the members of the respective communities; Read and comprehend (in translation) religious literature of various sorts within the context of the historical religious culture which gave rise to that literature and has in turn been shaped by it; Engage in critical analysis of religious phenomena, beliefs and practices on the one hand, and conflicting interpretations of them on the other, while also recognizing the validity and value of those phenomena, beliefs and practices for those who adhere to them; Appreciate the mutual influence of culture and historical context and a given religious tradition, and how each may affect the other at different times and in different places, while also recognizing the continuity of the faith tradition throughout history; Articulate their own thoughts effectively both orally and in writing, exhibiting command of the preceding abilities in terms appropriate to the academic study of religion. Student Learning Outcomes for Minors in Religious Studies Students who successfully complete a minor in Religious Studies should be able to: Read and comprehend (in translation) religious literature of various sorts within the context of the historical religious culture which gave rise to that literature and has in turn been shaped by it; Engage in critical analysis of religious phenomena, beliefs and practices on the one hand, and conflicting interpretations of them on the other, while also recognizing the validity and value of those phenomena, beliefs and practices for those who adhere to them; Articulate their own thoughts effectively both orally and in writing, exhibiting command of the preceding abilities in terms appropriate to the academic study of religion. Student Learning Outcomes for Majors in Philosophy Students who successfully complete a major in Philosophy should be able to: Read and comprehend arguments in their primary sources (in translation, as necessary); Demonstrate an understanding of the methodologies employed in philosophical inquiry, as well as the cultural and historical origins of those methods; Engage in a critical analysis of the legitimacy and limitations of the knowledge these methodologies elicit; Appreciate the role of cultural and historical context in the development of philosophy, and appreciate the ethical issues created by the culture and the dominant philosophies of the modern and contemporary West; Articulate their own thoughts and ideas relevant to philosophical inquiry orally and write essays that are clear and well structured, exhibiting command of the preceding abilities. Student Learning Outcomes for Minors in Philosophy Students who successfully complete a minor in Philosophy should be able to: Read and comprehend arguments in their primary sources (in translation, as necessary); Appreciate the role of cultural and historical context in the development of philosophy, and appreciate the ethical issues created by the culture and the dominant philosophies of the modern and contemporary West; Articulate their own thoughts and ideas relevant to philosophical inquiry orally and write essays that are clear and well structured, exhibiting command of the preceding abilities. [-]

Bachelor in Music

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The strength of Allegheny’s music program can be measured by the way music pervades the campus: one out of every 6 students is actively involved in a vocal or instrumental performance group. The department is deeply committed to the continuing musical education of majors and non-majors alike. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Music The strength of Allegheny’s music program can be measured by the way music pervades the campus: one out of every 6 students is actively involved in a vocal or instrumental performance group. The department is deeply committed to the continuing musical education of majors and non-majors alike. Major and Minor Programs Outcome Through the theory complex: Understanding of the materials of which music is put together. Through the history complex: Understanding of the evolution of music and the mutual influence music and society have on each other. Through the applied and ensemble programs: Understanding of the re-creative process and the self-discipline required to achieve it. Major The major program in Music leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in music and requires the completion of 48 semester hours of coursework including: 12 semester hours of music theory (Music 189, 288, 289, and 400); 12 semester hours of music history (Music 184, 286, 287, 384); 16 semester hours of ensemble participation and applied music at the 400-level on student’s principal instrument (either 10 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 6 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530, or 11 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 5 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530, or 12 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 4 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530); 2 semester hours of post-tonal music, the Junior Seminar and the Senior Project. Minor Students may elect to pursue a music minor with one of three emphases: music theory, music history, or performance. A minimum of 24 semester hours of coursework is required, distributed as follows: Music Theory emphasis: 12 semester hours of music theory (Music 189, 288, 289, and 400); 6 semester hours of music history (Music 184 and either 286 or 287); 6 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 4 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 2 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Music History emphasis: 6 semester hours of music theory (Music 189 and 288); 12 semester hours of music history (Music 184, 286, 287 and 384); 6 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 4 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 2 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Performance emphasis: 6 semester hours of music theory (Music 189 and 288); 6 semester hours of music history (Music 184 and either 286 or 287); 12 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 8 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 4 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Department Facts Key Allegheny Benefits An important part of preparation for graduate study. A balanced background in performance, theory and history. An appreciation of the creative and recreative processes of music. Experience in using research and source materials to independently approach music study. An enhanced appreciation of the importance of the arts in general and in relationship to other disciplines and unusual combinations. Endorsements Approximately 15-20% of the entire student body is involved in music department programs. “Despite pursuing a career outside of music, I have found that the discipline of music theory is applicable in many areas, and that I am more well-rounded in my knowledge than the engineering majors I work with. The most important part of the department is the professors: my music advisor became my mentor, a friend, and taught me things beyond music, things that I use in my everyday life.” – Barbara Anderson Werner ’91, math and music major, now a programmer analyst/software engineer with Logicon Geodynamics, Inc. “During my years at Allegheny, I had the chance to perform as a soloist for the Civic Symphony on two occasions. Through the support and instruction I received from the music department, I was able to do something I had never believed I could do. Through the hours and months of rehearsals, practice and preparation, I discovered that, if I put my mind to it, I could accomplish anything.” – Jennifer Story ’92, psychology major. ” Allegheny provided a nurturing environment that allowed me to examine my areas of interest with outstanding, caring instructors, which eventually led to my changing my major to music and drama. One of my advisors for my two majors was honest about my skills and limitations. Not only did he instruct and motivate me, but he challenged me always to be the best I could be. ” – Steve Sheftz ’83, music and drama major “We were not merely instructed to open our ears to a type of music that we had dismissed, but instead we were shown by example how to appreciate and embrace its universal and sweeping beauty. Rather than memorizing history, biography and theory, we were taught a far greater and more important skill: the art of listening and understanding.” – Reid Ockerman ’95, English major Jonathan Hamilton, ’07 Worship and Creative Arts Director, Erie First Assembly Church Facilities Strengths Electronic music voice lab providing synthesized and sampled sounds, as well as digitized graphing of vocal sounds Technology lab integrated with music curriculum Music lab with computers, synthesizers, and student tutors Department housed in Arnold Hall in the Henderson Campus Center, with classrooms, rehearsal and practice rooms Performance space includes 1,700-seat Shafer Auditorium and 450-seat Ford Memorial Chapel Steinway pianos in concert venues on campus Student Research and Special Projects Every Alleghenian completes a Senior Project in his or her major field-a significant piece of original work, designed by each student and a faculty advisor, that demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to work independently, to analyze and synthesize information, to write and speak persuasively and to complete a major assignment. Recent Senior Projects The Healing Power of Music Analytical Studies of Schoenberg’s Op. 11, 12 and 25 A Study of the Genre ‘Suite’ Exploring the Uses of Electronic Synthesizers in the Creation of Sound Tone Clusters (history and analysis of three works by Ives, Cowell, Bartok) Fantasia (composition for Chamber Choir and survey of contemporary musical notation systems) Chryses Awakening (an original opera) Use of Biofeedback in the Study of Singing Comparison of the Sound Production Mechanism of the Trumpet and the Light Amplification System of the Laser The Effects of Musical Key Changes on the Frontal Lobes in Musicians and Non-Musicians Using Electroencephalogram Alpha Desynchronization The Utilization of MIDI Technology as a Learning, Performing and Composing Tool Vocal Pedagogy Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: An Overview of Vocal Pedagogy An Overview of the History of Music Education in the U.S. A Study of Baroque and Classical Composition with an Emphasis on J.S. Bach and W.A. Mozart The Guitar in the 20th Century The Interrelation of Chopin’s Life and Works: A Case Study of Chopin’s Preludes op. 20 The Making of ‘Deforestation’: The Effectiveness of Music as an Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental Education (included original piano composition) Selected Student Achievements Six students have recently been featured as soloists with the Civic Symphony. Three others have been guest conductors for Choir and Band concerts. Student was the musical director of three major musicals performed on campus as well as a community Christmas show; also conducted a major concert of the music of St. Saëns, featuring a combined Allegheny orchestra plus professional musicians. Students have been selected to participate the Small College Intercollegiate Band as part College Band Directors National Association Conference at the University of Minnesota, the University of Texas at Denton, the University of Texas at Austin and at Alice Tully Hall, New York City Learning Outcomes Music Department Educational Objectives The study of music enables consumers (listeners), re-creators (performers), and creators (composers) to increase their understanding of both the sounded and written aspects of musical language. Musical Materials Courses These courses concern the sound materials that are used to construct musical works, theirorganization into systems, and their interrelationships, which give rise to musical significance. Students are expected to recognize and reproduce the basic elements both in sound and in notation, both in isolation and in complete musical contexts. Musical Styles Courses These are courses that concern musical style; its historic progression through different times, places, and cultures; and specific composers and works that contributed to that progression. Students are expected to recognize by sound and sight the ways in which musical elements are combined as compositional conventions: within a particular work, within the output of a composer, and by different composers in a particular time or place. Music Performance Courses The courses focus on performance, the actual production of music in sound. Students are expected to apply the physical requirements of playing different instruments to the elements of the score and to interpretative decisions, as the potential of notation becomes the reality of sounded music. Students learn repertoire for soloists individually in applied lessons and repertoire for groups of performers in ensembles. Music Department Learning Outcomes Students are expected to: Understand tools and methods used in musical research and be able to analyze sources accurately and critically; present their research in a clear and coherent manner both orally and in writing Demonstrate a broad understanding of musical materials and styles both as categories of musical significance and with regard to specific works and composers, Demonstrate competence as a performer on the chosen instrument both in solo andensemble repertoire. Opportunities Performance Instrumental Ensembles: Civic Symphony, Jazz Band, Wind Ensemble, Wind Symphony. Vocal: Chamber Choir, College Choir, College Chorus, Women’s Ensemble. Each semester, qualified students are chosen to be concerto soloists with instrumental ensembles, or to give chamber music, solo or joint recitals. Independent Study With one-on-one faculty supervision, students can explore areas not offered in the standard curriculum. Examples of recent Independent Studies include: Synthetic Analogs of Vocal Sound Fourier Analysis of Vocal Formats Form and Analysis Piano Literature from Classical and Romantic Periods Debussy and Ravel Field Study Annually, the department schedules trips to hear visiting artists and performing groups in the nearby cities of Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo. Touring Ensembles Some performing groups, including the Wind Symphony, the Wind Ensemble and the American Music Ensemble, go on tours, usually during semester breaks. Public Events In a typical semester, there are six or seven recitals by music students and faculty as well as three or four performances by visiting artists such as the Kronos Quartet, Richie Havens, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Some guests hold residencies in addition to performing on campus. The Alexander String Quartet, for example, has had annual residencies on campus since 1990. Honors and Prizes Flavia Davis Porter Award, to most talented instrumental musician Morten J. Luvaas Prize to choral music student Ethyl Moore Miller Prize to a junior or senior who shows exceptional progress and ability in musical studies and performance (first Miller Prize recipient was Dr. Richard A. Smith ’50, a chemistry major who has achieved great distinction as a chemist and professor of chemistry) Edith Mead Osborne Prize to the individual who shows marked musical ability, talent, or direction in voice, piano, or organ. The Frederick and Lucille Marantz Memorial Prize, awarded to outstanding piano students The Robert and Bronwell Bond Award awarded to an exceptional talented Allegheny student who will benefit from a rich musical experience away from the campus Other Opportunities Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Band Cooperative projects with public schools Accompaniment for services in local churches Paid teaching assignments with area youth Interested students have opportunities to perform for organizations and events in Meadville vicinity for volunteer or paid services Graduate School About 95% of our majors attend graduate or professional school eventually. About 90% go on directly, with a 100% acceptance rate. Top schools include: Eastman School of Music Cleveland Institute of Music University of Illinois University of Massachusetts Old Dominion University The most popular field of study include: music education, music therapy. Career Data About 10% of our majors seek jobs directly after graduation, and many secure work in a field of interest right away. The most popular fields with a bachelor’s degree: education, military performance. Our graduates are as likely to earn advanced degrees in geology, mathematics or medicine as they are to pursue graduate studies in music. The list of alumni gives some indication of the variety of career paths music majors pursue. [-]

Bachelor in Mathematics

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

In this program, students receive an introduction to all the major areas of mathematics. After an introductory foundation is established, students tailor electives to their own interests and needs. [+]

Bachelor in Mathematics Major and Minor Programs Students receive an introduction to all the major areas of mathematics. After an introductory foundation is established, students tailor electives to their own interests and needs. The department has also developed lists of recommended course selections and sequences for students interested in the following career areas: Actuarial mathematics Applied statistics Computational and applied analysis Operations research Pure mathematics Scientific computing Secondary teaching Student-designed and double majors are encouraged. Department Facts Distinctions Close working relationships between faculty and students Use of computer workstations (configured into classroom/lab setup) and Mathematica (powerful computer algebra and graphing system) for calculus classroom exercises and homework projects Accessibility of the mathematics faculty Encouragement and assistance for students to attend professional conferences and to present papers at conferences Active student chapter of the Mathematical Association of America Required individual Senior Project demonstrates to graduate schools and prospective employers the ability to complete a comprehensive independent assignment Chapter of the Pi Mu Epsilon national mathematics honorary society since 1995 Key Benefits Development of skills in problem solving and formal reasoning Introduction to all major areas of mathematics, including calculus, discrete mathematics, linear algebra, abstract algebra, probability and statistics, and analysis Preparation for many mathematical and math-related careers, such as graduate study and research, teaching, actuarial work, applied mathematics of many kinds, business, and computer-related fields Appreciation for the culture of mathematics as revealed through its history, the beauty of its ideas, and its particular way of knowing, which sets mathematics apart from all other disciplines Learning Outcomes All Students Who Take Mathematics Courses: Students who complete a course in the Department of Mathematics are expected to achieve the content learning outcomes for the course in which they are enrolled; think analytically and critically, and adapt their mathematical knowledge to solve problems in new situations in both mathematics and in other fields; communicate mathematical information in written form. The Minor in Mathematics: Students who minor in mathematics are expected to achieve mastery of a diverse collection of mathematical ideas, including the ideas of calculus; communicate mathematics both orally and in writing; think analytically and critically; to create mathematical models of real world problems, analyze them, and interpret the analysis. The Major in Mathematics: Students who major in mathematics are expected to achieve mastery of a rich and diverse set of mathematical ideas, with particular emphasis on the ideas of algebra and analysis; achieve an understanding of mathematical abstraction and the nature of mathematical proofs, including the ability to read and write proofs; communicate mathematics both orally and in writing; think analytically and critically; to create mathematical models of real world problems, analyze them, and interpret the analysis. Opportunities Independent Study Students, working one-on-one with a faculty advisor, independently pursue areas of study not offered in the standard curriculum. This is good preparation for the Senior Project. Special Lectures A lecture/seminar series by nationally known mathematicians is offered each year. Students have many opportunities for informal interaction with lecturers such as the editor of the American Mathematical Monthly, the president of the American Mathematical Society, and the president of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Honors and Prizes Outstanding academic achievement by majors is recognized through three prizes awarded annually by the department’s faculty. Clubs Dimensions, the student mathematics club, organizes social events, trips to professional conferences, and weekly discussion groups. Club members also gather to share career and graduate school information. Allegheny’s Pennsylvania Sigma Chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, the national honorary mathematics society, holds a banquet each fall to recognize excellence among undergraduate students in mathematics. [-]

Bachelor in Languages (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Latin, Spanish)

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Major and Minor Programs Students develop language skills while broadening their understanding of the cultural, political, and economic life of other countries. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Languages (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Latin, Spanish) Major and Minor Programs Students develop language skills while broadening their understanding of the cultural, political, and economic life of other countries. Majors offered in French, German and Spanish. Double majors encouraged (for example: French/psychology, German/economics, Spanish/political science). A separate international studies major comprises work in political science, economics, and history, as well as modern languages. Minors Departmental minors available in Chinese, French, German, Latin and Spanish Interdisciplinary minors offered in Chinese Studies, Classical Studies, French Studies, and Latin American & Caribbean Studies Language Placement All students are required to complete a foreign language placement exam before registering for a language class if they have had previous coursework or significant exposure to the foreign languages in which placement testing is available. Students who have had no previous language study do not need to take a placement test, just register for the introductory language course. Placement exams are available in Chinese, French, German, Latin, and Spanish. The test follows a multiple choice format and should take 15-20 minutes to complete. Test questions will assess grammar, vocabulary, and reading skills. Tests for Chinese and Latin will be automatically sent to the Building Coordinator of the Modern & Classical Languages department for assessment. The tests in French, German and Spanish are adaptive and will automatically structure the type and number of questions based on your responses. The test will report that you have completed it successfully and give a 3-digit score; click finish and log out. It is the 3-digit score the language faculty members need in order to determine course placement. The test determines the best match for continuing language study at the appropriate level. However, students may discuss their placement with a language department faculty member in Ruter Hall. If you are considering study abroad, it is recommended to begin language study early. If you have questions or need to take a placement test, please contact rcampbell@allegheny.edu in the Department of Modern & Classical Languages. Department Facts Distinctions Small classes, all taught exclusively in the target language Native or near-native fluency among all faculty Tutoring and help with cocurricular programs from international students Extensive opportunities for extracurricular learning, including language houses, language tables, and international film festivals Fully supported Senior Projects that prove to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment Key Benefits An understanding and appreciation of international cultures Critical thinking, analytical, and research skills Enhanced language skills (reading, writing, speaking) Proficiency in another language Global awareness Learning Outcomes The curriculum of the modern languages taught in the Department of Modern & Classical Languages is designed to build proficiency and understanding in three major areas (for Latin, please see “Classical Studies Outcomes” to the right): communication and practical use of language mastery of structural components and cognitive elements of language literary and cultural dimensions of language We believe that a successful liberal arts curriculum should integrate these three areas of focus at all levels. While practical communication and mastery of linguistic structures are essential, the trademark of language learning within the context of the liberal arts is its focus on the interdependence of language and culture. This interdependence is reflected in the inherent connections between language and the intellectual history of the various countries and regions where each language is spoken and in the expression of contemporary cultural values. We have outlined below the general principles that are common to the curricula of all sections within the department. Some of the specific methods and strategies used by each section are further detailed on the pages for each language and may be found by using the menu links. In order to facilitate increasing proficiency in communication and mastery of structure, we generally rely on the guidelines published by ACTFL (The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). They apply to the four skills of speaking, writing, aural comprehension, and reading and describe in detail the types of tasks speakers and writers must perform to attain each proficiency level, from novice to superior. Since most beginning and intermediate textbooks are also designed to teach and evaluate the mastery of increasingly complex and abstract linguistic use, we can effectively design courses with these specific objectives in mind. One specific strategy used across all sections of departmental modern languages to achieve these goals is the use of the target language at all levels. From the beginning to the advanced levels, the target language is used either exclusively or almost exclusively in all courses. Our language courses are offered three times per week. One or two additional period(s) of instruction and discussion per week (live lab) are part of the course work and taught by our international teaching assistants or advanced students. While these guidelines are extremely useful for meeting our goals in areas 1) and 2) as listed above, they are not sufficient for describing the desired outcome related to area 3). We must therefore also design our courses to meet these more academic and intellectual goals associated specifically with the liberal arts. Due to the academic nature of our curriculum and its focus on cultural understanding and critical thinking, we have tailored the ACTFL guidelines to suit our own curricular objectives and needs for teaching modern languages. We introduce more complex grammatical structures within the first two years of learning than would be expected if we adhered strictly to them. This prepares students to deal with literary and cultural materials containing such structures by the middle to end of the second year. They may not yet be able to actively use and manipulate complex constructions and literary tenses, but they are taught to recognize and understand them in order to further their intellectual growth. There are a variety of teaching methods and styles used in our courses by the individual sections, but all can be called communicative and conceptual. We do not embrace one particular method, but all methods used rely heavily on communication and on using culture as a context for that communication. At the lower levels, more concrete examples of cultural usage are emphasized, and these contexts become more complex as students progress. Another common principle seen in all sections is a renewed focus on culture at the more advanced levels. In the recent past, culture has become more broadly defined to include not only high culture, primarily literary texts in our discipline, but also cultural history, intellectual history and other manifestations of cultural values, arts such as cinema, and political institutions. Literature is increasingly taught within this broader cultural context which may highlight interrelations between the arts and other aspects of cultural history. In our most advanced courses, such as senior seminars and the senior project, we expect students to practice the integration of these three types of skills and knowledge. As in other disciplines, they are expected to study, research, and analyze abstract problems, and to think critically about their reading. At the same time, they are communicating and manipulating linguistic structures at an advanced level and learning abstract concepts related to the culture of their target language. The Senior Project is the capstone experience for every major. A successful thesis requires extensive research, demonstration of all language skills, critical analysis, organization, and effective argumentation. We have revised the guidelines for the senior project to make the rules more equitable for single majors in comparison to double majors. The major change is a decrease in length of the thesis for single majors (30pps) and an increase in length of the foreign language part for double majors (20pps). We continue to see the senior project and its oral defense as a means of demonstrating mastery of all of the skills and knowledge acquired during the student’s undergraduate career. The final principle shared by all sections in the department is the importance of study abroad. The linguistic and cultural immersion provided by this experience greatly enhances the acquisition of linguistic competence and is essential to gaining a real understanding of a different culture. Professors in each language have worked to create programs with easily transferrable courses that speak directly to our majors. Opportunities Experiential Learning/Study Abroad Students learning a foreign language are urged to spend a semester or preferably a year abroad. The College sponsors several distinct study-abroad programs which are open to all qualified Allegheny students. Allegheny’s financial aid may be used to support study in the following programs: American University in Cairo, Egypt program; Boston University internship program in Paris, France; Capital Normal University Study Abroad Program in Beijing, China; Center for Cross-Cultural Studies in Seville, Spain; CIIE Liberal Arts Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Dakar, Senegal Internship; Querétaro, Mexico Program; Quito, Ecuador Internship; Reutlingen, Germany Exchange Program; Université Catholique de l’Ouest in Angers, France; University of Cologne Germany Junior Year Abroad. Students not enrolling in the College-sponsored programs may, with the approval of the department and the Director of International Programs and Services, join other programs. Study abroad may exempt students from enrollment in certain required courses for the major on campus. Cocurricular Activities Internships on- and off-campus Language houses—Special-interest housing open to students studying Chinese, French, German and Spanish. Language tables—Several days a week, interested students and faculty meet for lunch. There are regular tables in Chinese, French, German, and Spanish. Gator International Students have the opportunity to publish their own creative work in a foreign language. The magazine is printed once a year. International Film Festival—A series of internationally known films from various countries is offered every spring semester. Scholarships and Honor Societies The Blair Hanson Scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding foreign language student to help defray the expenses of study abroad. The Arman Kalfayan Memorial Scholarship is awarded annually to a student majoring in one of the modern languages. Founding chapter of Phi Sigma Iota, international language honor society. Writer-in-Residence The department receives an annual grant from the Max Kade Foundation to fund the German Writer-in-Residence Program. Honors and Prizes The Blair Hanson Prize The Mildred Joanna Ludwig Prize The Alice Kemp Moessner Prize The Harald Robert Sauer Prize Center for Language and Culture The Center for Language and Culture offers the opportunity for supervised language study. Depending on student enrollment and the availability of resources, selected languages may include beginning level American Sign Language or English as a Second Language. Students contemplating such study must submit an application to the CLC Director as early as possible during registration. Applications are available in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, 104 Ruter Hall. [-]

Bachelor in International Studies

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The international studies program provides a strong multidisciplinary foundation for students’ futures, drawing on four academic disciplines: economics, history, modern languages, and political science. To ensure breadth of training and hands-on learning, our students take a core of thirteen courses in these four disciplines. Each student chooses a regional area of focus that corresponds to their language training. Recent Allegheny graduates note that their background in economics and modern languages has proved vital when vying for jobs or entrance to graduate schools. [+]

Bachelor in International Studies Major Programs The international studies program provides a strong multidisciplinary foundation for students’ futures, drawing on four academic disciplines: economics, history, modern languages, and political science. To ensure breadth of training and hands-on learning, our students take a core of thirteen courses in these four disciplines. Each student chooses a regional area of focus that corresponds to their language training. Recent Allegheny graduates note that their background in economics and modern languages has proved vital when vying for jobs or entrance to graduate schools. Department Facts Distinctions Unique major among colleges similar to Allegheny Required Senior Project demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to tackle multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research, to speak and write in a foreign language, and to complete a significant research assignment Breadth of curriculum, ensuring that students learn how to analyze a variety of societies and countries Extensive one-on-one interaction with faculty Many opportunities for study abroad Key Benefits Firm grounding in economic theory, history, and world politics Informed appreciation of the principles, logistics, and dynamics of international relations Knowledge of how economic, political, historical, and cultural factors influence and shape national behaviors and strategies Analytical skills needed for careers in international affairs An understanding and appreciation of other countries, cultures, and societies Analytical skills needed for careers abroad Excellent foundation for graduate school Critical reading, writing, and thinking skills Proficiency in at least one modern foreign language Learning Outcomes Allegheny students graduating with a degree in International Studies (or a double major that involves International Studies) are expected to demonstrate the following competencies and skills: Global Awareness Skills: The Partnership for 21st Century Skills defines global awareness as “the ability to understand global issues; learn from and work with people from diverse cultures; and understand the cultures of other nations, including the use of non-English languages.” By taking courses in various disciplines (especially in History, Political Science, Modern Languages and Economics), students are expected to demonstrate awareness of global issues. Research Capabilities: Ability to undertake original, independent, and interdisciplinary research on an international topic. Students are expected to complete and defend a well-researched senior project by the end of their course work. Regional Competency: While being knowledgeable in global issues, students are also expected to demonstrate knowledge of a specific region. Upon graduation, an International Studies student will become a “specialist” in one of the following regions: Latin America, East Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Europe. Competency could also be gained in other regions through a self-designed curriculum approved by the International Studies Steering Committee. Cultural Competency: Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of the culture of a foreign country through a semester-long study abroad program approved by the college. Cultural immersion would enable students to understand cultural aspects such as culinary habits, indigenous religions, political culture, family structures, values and ethics. Foreign Language Competency: Students are expected to be proficient in one of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German and Spanish. Language competency will be demonstrated partly by the ability to undertake a senior project in a foreign language. Interpersonal Skills in a Global Context: We expect International Studies students to be global citizens by developing the skills for interacting with people from different cultural, ethnic, socio-economic, and religious background. Opportunities Experiential Learning Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Student Intern Program Work experience in Washington, D.C., for students interested in careers in international relations. Harvard National Model United Nations Each year Allegheny attends the country’s largest and most prestigious Model UN event, which attracts 2,000 students from more than 120 institutions. Recently, two Alleghenians were among sixty participants honored for their presentations. Washington Semester at American University Students study source materials and government institutions in the nation’s capital. Internships and coursework in several areas including law, politics, journalism, and environmental policy. EL Summer Internships Three-week work experiences at a variety of organizations in Boston, New York City, and Washington, D.C. These internships are offered primarily through our alumni in those regions. Allegheny College supports this initiative by securing housing for the interns. EL Summer Study Tour Courses In May 2016, The International Education Office, now part of the Allegheny Gateway, will offer eight EL Seminars. The seminars are between 14 days & 3 weeks long and are worth 2-4 experiential learning credits towards graduation. All EL Seminars are led by Allegheny faculty and administrators and begin soon after the end of Spring semester 2016. All EL Travel Seminars are pending student enrollment numbers which will be determined in mid-November 2015. Seminars with low enrollment numbers will be cancelled. Study Abroad Study abroad is required of all majors. The College sponsors a range of study-abroad programs that are open to all Allegheny students who meet the specific program requirements. These include: Programs offering courses directly related to international studies: Argentina—Buenos Aires (CIEE-Liberal Arts Program) Australia (James Cook University) England (Lancaster University, University of Oxford) South Africa (KwaZulu University of Natal) India (University of Minnesota Studies in International Development) Kenya (University of Minnesota Studies in International Development) Israel (Arava Institute, University of Haifa) Costa Rica (School for Field Studies) Language and area studies programs (intermediate to advanced host country language skills required) Germany (Allegheny-in-Cologne, Universität Tübingen) France (Université Catholique de l’Ouest and Boston University Paris Internship Program) Spain (Center for Cross-Cultural Study in Seville) Mexico (ITESM in Querétaro) China (Capital Normal University, CIEE Programs in Beijing, Nanjing, Shanghai) Ecuador (University of Minnesota Studies in International Development) Senegal (University of Minnesota Studies in International Development) Programs offering internships and field placements Paris, France Quito, Ecuador Jaipur, India Nairobi, Kenya Dakar, Senegal Allegheny’s financial aid packages support study in all Allegheny-sponsored programs. Students not enrolling in the College-sponsored programs may, with the approval of the International Studies Committee and the director of the international office, participate in other programs. Study abroad may exempt students from certain courses required for the major. The Wayne Reynolds Merrick Fellowship in International Studies is available to assist in funding for year, semester, or summer study abroad. Argentina—Buenos Aires (CIEE-Liberal Arts Program) Australia—Townsville (James Cook University Study Abroad Program) Dakar, Senegal Other Opportunities Extensive Co-curricular Activities Model United Nations, Allegheny Research Interest Group, Amnesty International chapter, World Issues Forum, International Club, Young Democrats, College Republicans, mock conventions and elections, Debate Team. International Film Festival Language Tables Several days each week interested students and faculty meet together for lunch. There are regular tables in Chinese, French, German, and Spanish. Max Kade International House The Max Kade International House in the newly- constructed North Village brings together under one roof separate residences for students majoring in Chinese, German, French, and Spanish and those in the MENA minor. [-]

Bachelor in History

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

As a department, we strive to provide wisdom in particular historical fields, and to assist our students in the development of conceptual skills, critical analysis, research competence, writing fluency, and sophistication in the uses and abuses of knowledge. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in History The study of history helps us to understand the differences and similarities between our own lives, thought, and habits and those of a variety of past and present cultures. It allows us to understand other people better through seeing them in their own contexts, and to understand ourselves through serious self-reflection. We treat history as an interpretive endeavor, investigating from various points of view the ways in which individuals and social groups have sought to order and understand their world across time. As a department, we strive to provide wisdom in particular historical fields, and to assist our students in the development of conceptual skills, critical analysis, research competence, writing fluency, and sophistication in the uses and abuses of knowledge. Major & Minor Major The major in History leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree and requires successful completion of 46 semester credit hours of coursework in History, distributed as follows: One course in the field of American History (4 credit hours) One course in the field of European History (4 credit hours) Two courses in the field of non-Western History (8 credit hours) FSHIS 201 (4 credit hours) One Junior Seminar (4 credit hours) One Senior Project (6 credit hours) A minimum of at least four courses (16 credit hours), excluding the Junior Seminar and Senior Project, must be taken at or above the 300+ level. Minor The minor in History requires successful completion of a minimum of 24 semester credit hours of coursework in History, distributed as follows: One course in the field of American History (4 credit hours) One course in the field of European History (4 credit hours) One courses in the field of Non-Western History (4 credit hours) A minimum of at least two courses (8 credit hours), excluding the Junior Seminar, must be taken at or above the 300+ level. One Junior Seminar (4 credit hours) Why study History? A major in history is of great value because it teaches you to: draw connections between disparate societies and institutions. assess subjects from multiple perspectives. research, evaluate evidence, communicate, and problem solve. Worried about studying History?: Facts to dispel the myths that make some people nervous about majoring or minoring in History. History isn’t about memorizing boring facts. The discipline is versatile; you don’t have to go into education! History teaches people to think; it doesn’t train you narrowly for today’s soon-to-be-outdated job world. Historical knowledge is a powerful currency for the 21st century. From the Boston University History Department, 2015. Liberal Arts Disciplines Prepare Graduates for Long-Term Professional Success: Analysis of census data tracks long-term earnings and employment rates of liberal arts graduates. Findings counter stereotypes about the value of liberal education. Association of American Colleges & Universities, January 2014. “. . . whatever undergraduate major they may choose, students who pursue their major within the context of a broad liberal education substantially increase their likelihood of achieving long-term professional success.” Why a History Degree is Useful in the Business World. Christopher Brooks, American Historical Association, February 2015. While studying in Germany, an American legal history graduate student took freelance jobs on the support staffs of various businesses to pay the bills. One day, he put in a bid for an assignment for a pretty big client and was invited to give his sales pitch. The company’s European head of research and development, a German, interviewed him. The discussion began with basic courtesies and talk about what the company needed; there was little discussion about the American’s academic background. About five minutes into the interview, the German pointed to a reproduction of a painting on the wall behind his desk and asked the American, “Who painted that?” The American replied, “Matisse, I think.” The German responded, “Good! Now, what are your thoughts on the Marshall Plan?” And so the discussion went, for about 10 more minutes, after which time the American interjected: “Excuse me, sir, but why are you asking me all of these history questions?” The German: “Well, we had an American VP who was in a meeting recently with a French client, me, and my boss. The Frenchman looked up to the wall, pointed at the painting before him, this very one, and asked, ‘Who painted that?’ The American VP said, ‘I don’t know. I don’t need to know that stuff.’ At that moment, the French client left the room, along with his three-million-euro account.” “Why did I ask you about history?” the German continued. “It is important for our business. And since you could answer my questions, you have the job.” What can I do with a History major? Career Options for History Majors: Data about jobs & employers and strategies to win the perfect job. What Can I Do With This Major?: Table of links to career options for all majors. Careers for History Majors: A miniguide from the American Historical Association. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Information: United States Department of Labor guide to career information about hundreds of occupations. Learning Outcomes The guiding principle behind these learning goals is to create a clear path of student development in keeping with the goals and philosophies outlined in the History Department’s mission statement. Lower level courses (100 and 200s) seek to introduce students to the interpretative facets of history while providing them with a general level of knowledge about particular topics or national histories. Upper-level courses (300s) seek to deepen the awareness of contingency, both culturally and temporally, with greater emphasis on the contested nature of history’s meaning. The 500-level junior seminars are meant to prepare our majors for their Senior Projects by fostering more independent inquiry both in and outside the classroom. They also provide our many minors with a capstone experience that reinforces the distinctive practices and outlooks of historians. Taken as a whole, we believe that these learning goals reinforce the complex relationship between past and present, promote greater awareness of difference, and develop the skills—research, writing, and analysis—that are essential parts of the historian’s craft. Program Outcomes Acquire knowledge of particular historical contexts Analyze historical sources Understand how historians interpret the past Develop an historian’s skills, including reading, writing, speaking, and critical inquiry Be able to execute guided and independent research projects, up to and including the Senior Comprehensive Project in History 100-Level Courses Students are introduced to geographic, regional, or national histories that emphasize broad processes, themes, and developments Students have the opportunity to work with primary sources and critically assess competing historical arguments Students are introduced to history as an open-ended process of interpretation Students are introduced to history as a scholarly discipline or profession Students develop written communication skills in the discipline, including proper citation 200-Level Courses Students receive an introduction to a historical topic that nurtures an interest in history and prepares them for a more in-depth and comprehensive study of the past Students are introduced to different sources of the past (primary, secondary, literature, visual media, etc.) Students are introduced to historical debates (or history as an interpretative scholarly endeavor) Students engage in the development of a historical perspective (origins, circumstances, processes) Students develop oral and written communication skills 300-Level Courses Students engage the past around a particular theme or set of themes in a regional or temporal context Students become familiar with the historiography and are able to evaluate historians’ arguments and interpretations regarding the course theme(s) Students develop skills of assessing and utilizing both secondary and primary sources Students develop research skills and work on generating their own historical interpretations Students can write papers with critical analysis and historical inquiry, utilizing proper citation 500-Level Courses [course numbered 550-589] Students make an advanced exploration into a specific historical topic Students will read, discuss, and evaluate contrasting historical interpretations Students conduct research with primary and secondary sources, develop their own arguments, and write a research paper with proper citations according to the Chicago Manual of Style Students engage in the communication and exchange of ideas with peers at an advanced level and present the outcomes of their research Students in the major prepare for the writing of their senior project with well-defined themes, proper research methods, and appropriate sources; students completing a minor build upon the content and methodology of other courses for the minor to produce a research essay that serves as a culminating capstone experience. History 600 The Senior Project is the capstone experience at Allegheny College. The Project and its oral defense provides students with an opportunity to integrate discipline-specific scholarship with the communication and research skills they have been developing since their First Year at the College. The object of the Senior Project in the Department of History is to enable students to pursue independent historical research on a topic of their own choosing and to report their findings in a substantial paper. The goal of the Senior Project is for a student to explore independently an historical topic of their own choosing, understand the views expressed by historians about their topic, and craft their own interpretation of their chosen subject in a substantial paper. Students will have the counsel of a member of the department chosen by the student as the project director, but it is the student’s responsibility to take the initiative in seeking advice. Student work is evaluated on: The quality of their research, The originality of their thesis, The strength of their argument, The nature of their sources, both primary and secondary, Their clarity of written expression, and Their clarity of oral expression. Evaluation of the Senior Project is conducted by a board of examiners consisting of two members of the Department of History, or, if the project is undertaken in conjunction with another department, by one member of the Department of History and one member of the other department. Students are examined orally by this board on the general field of knowledge and period of time with which the Project is concerned, the specific information contained in the paper, and their methods of research. History 600 Learning Outcomes Students will: Choose a Senior Project Topic Write an historiographical essay including major secondary sources about their chosen topic. Identify key primary sources critical to their Project. Compile an extensive bibliography, utilizing The Chicago Manual of Style, including primary and secondary sources for their project Complete a chapter outline of the Senior Project. History 610 Learning Outcomes Students will: Conduct extensive research in primary sources on the topic of their Senior Project. Read and master the interpretations of the major secondary sources on their topic. Develop a clear and persuasive thesis for their Senior Project. Write an extensive paper on their topic which conforms to The Chicago Manual of Style in notes and bibliography and contains minimal stylistic and typographical errors. Articulate why they have chosen their topic in an oral examination. Answer questions beyond the immediate scope of their project, demonstrating contextual awareness, in their oral examination. [-]

Bachelor in Geology

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The Allegheny Geology Department emphasizes a close, hands-on approach with lots of field experiences. We have a small student-faculty ratio with a supportive atmosphere and we are committed to providing students with an outstanding foundation in the geosciences. [+]

Bachelor in Geology The Allegheny Geology Department emphasizes a close, hands-on approach with lots of field experiences. We have a small student-faculty ratio with a supportive atmosphere and we are committed to providing students with an outstanding foundation in the geosciences. Geology Department Highlights: Over 95% success of geology graduates for jobs and graduate school acceptance Allegheny is highly recommended for study in geology by Ruggs The Geology Department ranks in the top 5% in eventual Ph.Ds. Degree programs for different career objectives: B.A. and B.S. in Geology & Environmental Geology Major and Minor Programs The Geology Department has three major programs: Environmental Geology (B.S.) and Geology (B.A. or B.S.). Both B.S. programs meet the requirements for certification/registration now mandated by most states for those employed in environmental fields such as groundwater contamination and exploration, geologic land use (e.g. coastal zones, landslides, flooding, earthquakes) and geologic resources (e.g. fossil fuels, mining and reclamation, geothermal energy). Major in Environmental Geology (B.S.) This program is designed to prepare students for graduate study involving Earth-surface processes or for employment as environmental geologists. It emphasizes those areas with most immediate societal relevance—hydrogeology, coastal processes, geomorphic processes, land use, energy resources, geochemistry of water and soils, etc. Major in Geology (B.S.) This program is designed to prepare students for graduate study in all aspects of geology or for employment as professional geologists. Major in Geology (B.A.) This flexible program can accommodate a variety of objectives, such as preparation for graduate programs in law or business or entry into a career field (e.g. K–12 teaching, public policy). Minor A minor in geology requires the successful completion of Environmental Geology or Physical Geology, Historical Geology, and three upper-level courses. Department Facts Distinctions Small student-faculty ratio in a close, mutually supportive collegial atmosphere. Strong faculty commitment to teaching and providing students with a wide range of research opportunities. Three degree programs serve different career objectives. Extensive field experience through in-course field trips, a week-long Junior Seminar trip and independent study. Required Senior Project that demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major independent research project. Extensive computing, analytical, field, and scale-modeling equipment accessible to all students. All students have access to all departmental facilities, producing special opportunities usually reserved for graduate students at other institutions. Key Benefits An appreciation of the place and role of humanity on the Earth today and in the context of geologic time. Research skills developed by a hands-on approach to learning, independent study, and field experience. Critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Sound preparation for graduate study in geology and environmental geology. Excellent preparation for professional employment, especially in the environmental geology fields of hydrogeology and land use. An understanding of how the Earth works today and has worked through geologic time. Student Internship Opportunities Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs) Link: https://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/reu_search.jsp About the REU program: REUs are competitive summer research programs for undergraduates studying science, engineering, or mathematics. The programs are sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and are hosted in various universities throughout the country. Individual REU opportunities tend to be specialized in a specific field of science (e.g., mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology, biology,psychology, computer science). GeoCorps America Link: https://rock.geosociety.org/g_corps/index.htm About the program: GeoCorps America is a program sponsored by the Geological Society of America (GSA), operated in partnership with government agencies and organizations such as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and US Forest Service (USFS). The program offers paid short-term geoscience assignments in many national parks, state parks, and other public lands. GeoCorps topics commonly include geology, hydrology, paleontology, geological mapping, mineralogy, soil science, glaciology, geo- hazards, education, and interpretation. US Geological Survey Pathways Internship Program Link: https://www2.usgs.gov/humancapital/sw/studentinterns.html About the program: The USGS internship program is designed to provide students enrolled in a wide variety of educational institutions, from high school to graduate level, with opportunities to work in agencies and explore Federal careers with paid internships. Internships may be temporary (term) positions, and may lead to permanent employment. Internships must be searched and applied for on the USAJOBS website. American Geosciences Institute (AGI) Internships & Fellowships Link: https://www.americangeosciences.org/policy/internships-and- fellowships About the opportunity: AGI offers geoscience policy-based internships during different parts of the year for undergraduate and masters students. During internships, students work actively with Congress and federal agencies to build public policy in areas that affect geoscientists, including water, energy, mineral resources, geohazards, environmental protection, and federal funding for geoscience research and education. Department of Energy (DOE) Student Programs & Internships Link: https://energy.gov/student-programs- and-internships About the opportunity: The DOE offers a variety of internships, educational programs, and fellowships for students of all levels (high school through graduate school). There are two different types of paid internships that focus on 1) work that isn’t necessarily related to students’ academic/career choices, and 2) work that is directly related to students’ fields of study. O’Brien & Gere (environmental consulting) http: www.obg.com/careers About the opportunity: O’Brien & Gere is an international environmental consulting firm that employs a variety of scientists and engineers that study energy, the environment, and water resources. Arcadis (environmental consulting) Link: https://www.arcadis.com/en/united-states/careers/graduates- and-interns/ About the opportunity: Arcadis is an international design and consulting firm that specializes in environmental construction, decontamination and restoration, environmental planning, site evaluation, strategic environmental consulting, and waste management. EQT Corporation (natural gas production) Link: https://www.eqt.com/careers/opportunities About the opportunity: EQT is a technology-driven leader in natural gas production, operating six states, that emphasizes horizontal drilling and green completions. Moody & Associates, Inc. (environmental services) Link: www.moody-s.com/ About the opportunity: Moody & Associates is a long-time presence in the Meadville area, specializing in environmental site assessment, soil and groundwater remediation, monitoring/sampling of contaminated sites, groundwater modeling, environmental well drilling, and GIS support services. PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Link: www.dep.pa.gov/About/Employment/Jobs/Pages/Internships.aspx About the opportunity: The PA DEP offers engineering, science, and technical internship to undergraduate and graduate students that are enrolled full-time, have completed at least one year of schooling, are in good academic standing, and are PA residents or are attending a PA college/university. The DEP offers both paid an unpaid internships during which students learn about and assist with program office functions under mentorship of professional staff. Duties/projects vary, but former DEP interns have worked on environmental protection projects related to acid mine drainage, dam safety, oil and gas, and public health. PA Department of Conservation & Natural Resources (DCNR) Link – internships: www.dcnr.state.pa.us/humanresources/interns/index.htm Link – volunteering: www.volunteers.dcnr.state.pa.us/index.aspx About the opportunity: The PA DCNR has a diverse portfolio in Pennsylvania, and regulates the state park system, trails, forestry resources, water resources, and hydrocarbon resources. The Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey specializes in understanding Pennsylvania’s geological and groundwater resources. ExxonMobil undergraduate internships Link: careers.exxonmobil.com/en About the program: ExxonMobil is one of the few major, international oil company that offers internships to undergraduates. An internship experience with a major oil company will provide insight into industry applications of geoscience, and are commonly paid. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) Offered through the Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy Link: http://orise.orau.gov/mlef/applicants/default.html Newmont Mining (internships and entry-level jobs) Link: http://www.newmont.com/join-our-team At Newmont, we’re committed to building a sustainable global mining business while leading in innovation, safety, environmental stewardship and social responsibility. To accomplish our goals, we need something we find more valuable than gold or copper – talented students. We are always looking for bright Geoscience students to join us for Internships and entry-level roles in our Emerging Talent Program. [-]

Bachelor in Environmental Science

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Environmental Science is the study of interrelationships between human activities and the environment. We examine effects of human actions on the environment, and the means by which policies, regulations, and decisions influence human actions. We also examine human behavioral, cultural, and sociological interactions that affect the environment. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Environmental Science Environmental Science is the study of interrelationships between human activities and the environment. We examine effects of human actions on the environment, and the means by which policies, regulations, and decisions influence human actions. We also examine human behavioral, cultural, and sociological interactions that affect the environment. Major Programs The program offers two interdisciplinary programs, Environmental Science and Environmental Studies, with over a dozen study area concentrations. Major in Environmental Science For students interested in fields such as air and water quality, conservation biology, agro-ecology, public health, environmental engineering, forestry, and fisheries. Areas of concentration include: conservation ecology, terrestrial ecosystems, aquatic ecosystems, landscape ecology, environmental health and toxicology, environmental geology and environmental chemistry. Major in Environmental Studies For students interested in environmental law, public policy, environmental art, environmental literature, philosophy, women and the environment, resource management, environmental writing, and land use planning. Areas of concentration include: environmental philosophy, environmental history, communications and the environment, ecological economics, environmental law, environmental policy, international sustainable development, culture and the environment, art and the environment, environmental education, community development, and urban planning and land use. Department Facts Key Benefits Enhanced understanding—from scientific, social, and humanities perspectives—of the environment and current environmental issues. Experience in solving actual environmental problems. Ability to use modern research methods to explain observations about the natural world and about societies. A network of alumni in government, industry, and the academic world linking students to jobs and graduate programs. Distinctions One of the oldest environmental science departments in the country (established in 1972). Numerous opportunities for experiential learning in nearby natural environments: wetlands, lakes, streams, and forests, including a College-owned research reserve. Extensive internship opportunities with local, state, and federal agencies, nonprofit environmental organizations, and local industry. Vigorous off-campus study programs in Costa Rica, India, Kenya, Israel, Ecuador and elsewhere. Emphasis on independent research. Required Senior Project that demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major independent research project. Faculty who involve students in local, state, national and international environmental issues and research. A NASA New Investigator Award supports the study of the influences of El Niño climatic events in Philippine farming systems and forest use. Awards from the National Science Foundation support student-faculty research on forest and aquatic ecosystems. Grants totaling $1.3 million from the Heinz Endowment, Mellon Foundation, Eden Hall Foundation, Luce Foundation, and others support the College’s commitment to sustainable community development and improved environmental quality in northwestern Pennsylvania. Faculty members have received prestigious Fulbright Scholar Awards. Students have received prestigious Udall Scholarships for environmental leadership. Related Programs Environmental Writing Track, English Minor Environmental Geology, Minor Arts and the Environment, Art Minor Political Science, Environmental Classes Economics, Environmental Classes History, Environmental Classes Outside the Classroom Off-Campus Study The department encourages students to participate in off-campus opportunities. A few of the programs offered include: Arava Institute for Environmental Studies: a semester- or year-long program in sustainable development and peace at Kibbutz Ketura, Israel. School for Field Studies in Costa Rica: a semester-long first-hand study of ecological, social, and political aspects of sustainable development in Costa Rica. The Ecosystems Center: a semester of intensive terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem study in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Duke Marine Biological Lab: a semester-long study of marine ecology and policy. Part of the semester is spent at Duke’s Beaufort Marine Station and part at the Bermuda Biological Laboratory. Experiential Learning Internships Half of all department majors participate in internships. Recent examples: Conservation biology: Erie National Wildlife Refuge, Tamarack Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Soil erosion: Crawford County Conservation District Land use planning: Crawford County Planning Commission Environmental regulation: Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Industrial ecology: PPG Industries, Channellock, Inc., Meadville, Pa. Environment and religion: The Glinodo Center, Erie, Pa. Creek Connections Creek Connections has forged an effective partnership between Allegheny College and regional K-12 schools to turn waterways in Northwest Pennsylvania, Southwest New York, and the Pittsburgh area into outdoor environmental laboratories. Emphasizing a hands-on, inquiry based investigation of local waterways, this project annually involves over 40 different secondary schools and the classes of 50 teachers. Project Goals: Regional Schools and College Collaborative Hands-On Investigative Project Ongoing Water Quality Analysis Increase Awareness of Natural Resources Field Studies Allegheny is ideally located for the study of the natural environment and areas affected by human activity. Nearby field-study areas include: Allegheny National Forest, Erie National Wildlife Refuge, Presque Isle State Park, Geneva wetlands, numerous lakes and streams. Allegheny College owns the Bousson Environmental Research Reserve, a couple miles east of campus is 283 acres of woodlands, ponds, streams, wetlands, diverse habitats and native wildlife. Student Learning Outcomes Student Learning Outcomes for Majors in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies Students who successfully complete a major in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies are expected to be able to: Demonstrate a general understanding of the breadth and interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues. (ENV 110) Demonstrate a general understanding of the qualitative and quantitative research methods to gain empirical evidence bearing on evaluation of environmentally sustainable alternatives. (ES 210) Demonstrate depth of critical analysis and writing of environmental problems that span popular, ‘gray’ and primary publications. (FSENV 201) Demonstrate the ability to locate, interpret and apply published research and lessons from successful projects to a focused environmental solution with potential regional stakeholders. (ES 58x) Design, conduct and present (orally and in writing) independent research that is consistent with the highest standards and practices of research in environmental science. (ES 6xx) Be well-prepared for meaningful careers and post-graduate education in fields related to environmental science and beyond. Specific Student Learning Outcomes for Majors in Environmental Science Students who successfully complete a major in Environmental Science are expected to be able to: Articulate the interdisciplinary context of environmental issues. Identify and justify key stakeholders in humanities and social sciences that need to be a part of sustainable solutions. Formulate an action plan for sustainable alternatives that integrate science, humanist, and social perspectives. Specific Student Learning Outcomes for Majors in Environmental Studies Students who successfully complete a major in Environmental Studies are expected to be able to: Articulate the interdisciplinary context of environmental issues. Identify and justify key stakeholders in the natural sciences that need to be a part of sustainable solutions. Formulate an action plan for sustainable alternatives that integrates science, humanist, and social perspectives. [-]

Bachelor in English

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Allegheny’s English Department offers a wide range of courses in literature and in creative and expository writing. The study of literature provides our students with a variety of interpretive methods and perspectives, increases their awareness of the range of creative expression, and introduces them to cultural values that deepen and challenge their own. [+]

Bachelor in English Allegheny’s English Department offers a wide range of courses in literature and in creative and expository writing. The study of literature provides our students with a variety of interpretive methods and perspectives, increases their awareness of the range of creative expression, and introduces them to cultural values that deepen and challenge their own. Our curriculum seeks to improve students’ ability to express their own best ideas in a variety of forms. By mastering modes of analytical reading, critical explication, coherent argument, and creative thinking, students acquire those skills required to succeed in many professional fields. By studying a variety of literatures in English, they learn to recognize the ideas and perspectives that shape their own and earlier times; and by cultivating a sensitivity to and healthy skepticism about the subtlety and power of language, they become educated in the fullest sense. Major & Minor Programs English Major A progression of courses designed to foster critical thinking, speaking, and writing skills. 40-48 semester hours. English Major English Major with an emphasis in Creative Writing English Major with an emphasis in Journalism English Minor English Environmental Writing Writing Department Facts Distinctions Literature major with an additional option of two writing emphases. Extraordinary range of courses in literature and creative and expository writing. Inclusion of critical writing in every English course. Accessible, accomplished faculty. Student faculty ratio: 6-to-1 for declared majors Average class size: 19 Two levels of fiction, nonfiction and poetry writing classes. Single Voice Reading Series—an opportunity to hear and meet nationally known writers. Readers have included John Updike, Carolyn Forché, Tobias Wolff, W.D. Snodgrass, Robert Olen Butler, Tim O’Brien, and Mark Doty. Senior Projects that prove to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. The Allegheny Review, a national journal of undergraduate literature (edited by Allegheny students). Most classes meet in Oddfellows Hall on North Main Street, on the north end of campus. English courses that encourage students to explore connections between literature and other disciplines. Key Benefits Exposure to many interpretive methods and perspectives. An ability to access and refine creative expression. Critical thinking and writing skills needed for professional success in many fields, including law, education, communications and media, advertising, and public relations. An understanding and appreciation of language. A firm grounding in classic, contemporary, and nontraditional literature. An understanding of modern approaches and fields, including feminist theory and criticism, post-colonial literature, news writing, film, and literary theory. Endorsements 90 percent acceptance rate of Allegheny English majors applying to graduate and professional school. “The small class size at Allegheny and the corresponding individual attention from professors are a real benefit; my academic advisor and my Senior Project advisor didn’t just help me academically, they helped me plan my future.” – Susan Lipsitz ’88, Boston attorney “This professor teaches her classes in a way that excites students not only to understand the material, but to challenge themselves to truly learn.” – Recent student Twice recently, Allegheny was one of 20 institutions nationwide chosen to receive a Lila Wallace Reader’s Digest Fellow. Allegheny Review won so many Columbia Scholastic Press Association awards that the editors stopped entering the journal in the contests. The department ranks in the top 5 percent among private undergraduate institutions in production of eventual Ph.D.s since 1920. “I am very impressed [with Allegheny], particularly with the creative writing teachers here, and also with the English department. I find the faculty uncommonly dedicated and serious and rigorous.” — Carolyn Forché, author of The Angel of History Opportunities Student Achievements Presentation at National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Poem published in Montage, international magazine published simultaneously by Stanford University and in Russia Poetry readings Book review published in Studies in the Humanities Article published in Wittenberg Review, literary magazine Article published in Aethlon, sports journal One of 10 students nationwide chosen to participate in the Bucknell Seminar for Younger Poets Annie Nybo has won first prize in the essay-writing contest run in connection with The Jane Austen Festival. The festival is sponsored by the Jane Austen Society of North America and will be held this year in Pittsburgh. Experiential Learning The Campus, weekly student newspaper Allegheny Review, nationally-known undergraduate literary magazine Overkill, Allegheny-specific literary magazine Journalism internship with the Meadville Tribune Writing Fellows: peer writing consultants at the Learning Commons Student readings Study abroad programs in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Australia. For more information on international programs, click here. Greece Experiential Learning trip READ Internship: a Service Learning internship incorporating students as tutors in Crawford County adult literacy program Associated Writing Program’s annual conference and book fair through the Allegheny Review Single Voice Reading Series—an opportunity to hear and meet nationally known writers. Careers About 80 percent of English majors ultimately attend graduate or professional school. About 30 percent go on directly, with a 90 percent acceptance rate. Recent Schools include: Brown University Duke University Boston College University of Edinburgh UCLA Carnegie Mellon University University of Pennsylvania Stanford University New York University Columbia University University of Pittsburgh University of Maryland Emerson College University of Michigan University of Leeds, UK About 70 percent of English majors seek employment directly following graduation. Recent Employers include: Springboard Media Squirrel Hill Magazine Teach for America Times Publishing Co. AmeriCorps Vision Global Solutions Island Press Tribune Chronicle Culpepper Citizen Career Opportunity Areas Writing/Editing Education Publishing Advertising Public Relations Business Law General Information and Strategies A bachelor’s degree in English is sufficient for many entry level positions in business and industry. A major in English is also good preparation for continued graduate or professional training in areas such as English, law, political science/government, public administration, communications, and religious studies (i.e., seminary). Because English can lead to many different career paths, it is important to identify an area of interest and be planful about gaining the right skills, experience, and credentials to enter that field. Be prepared to be proactive, determined, assertive, and confident in order to secure freelance writing opportunities. Writers typically experience many rejections for each piece that is accepted for publication. Save samples of written work to be used for a portfolio. Cultivate other career opportunities in order to supplement a freelance writing income. Obtain additional areas of expertise such as journalism, broadcasting, technical writing, or politics for specialized positions. For careers in advertising or public relations be prepared to begin in an entry-level position. Appropriate teacher certification is required for public school teaching. A graduate degree is required for teaching at the college or university level. Conduct informational interviews or shadow professionals in careers of interest to learn more about their jobs. Join relevant professional associations. Attend their conferences and read their journals. [-]

Bachelor in Economics, including business

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The Department of Economics offers students a program that requires a balance of theory and application in its curriculum. The offerings are a combination of theory courses, quantitative work, and a number of field courses that are also accessible to non-majors and minors. It is a program designed to provide a liberal educational foundation for citizen and voter, for advanced study in Economics, or other professions, and careers such as international affairs, law, business, finance, education and public policy. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Pennsylvania USA. Bachelor in Economics, including business Economics, a social science, studies the production, distribution, and consumption of products and services. The scarcity of human, natural, and other material resources requires that these activities be well-directed to enhance the general welfare of the global population. In the process of learning how human societies could accomplish such goals, economics has come to include a core of widely accepted general theory, techniques for using data to test hypotheses and draw inferences, and skills that are often refined by experience in the application of theory to particular problems. Like many related disciplines in a liberal arts curriculum, Economics emphasizes oral, written, and quantitative methods in courses and seminars. The Department of Economics offers students a program that requires a balance of theory and application in its curriculum. The offerings are a combination of theory courses, quantitative work, and a number of field courses that are also accessible to non-majors and minors. It is a program designed to provide a liberal educational foundation for citizen and voter, for advanced study in Economics, or other professions, and careers such as international affairs, law, business, finance, education and public policy. Major and Minor Programs Major Foundation courses build a base of theoretical knowledge and quantitative skills. Elective courses allow students to apply theories to study economic and financial phenomena. The Senior Project integrates knowledge and skills acquired in all previous courses. Majors must complete at least 48 semester hours in economics. Double majors and self-designed majors are encouraged. Minor Completion of at least 24 semester hours. Track in Business Economics Designed for those planning management careers, business economics applies the sophisticated tools of economics and quantitative analysis to business decision-making. Students electing this track focus their economics major with coursework in accounting, introductory and advanced managerial economics, statistics for managerial economics, and electives such as corporate finance, environmental and resource management, and economics of entrepreneurship. Department Facts Key Allegheny Benefits Excellent foundation for graduate study in a wide variety of fields: law, business, economics, government. A solid grounding in a lifetime’s knowledge of America’s place in the world economy, its policy issues, and complex social and economic problems. Analytical and reasoning skills developed through such quantitative methods as statistics and models and their applications. Effective oral and written communication skills, developed in seminar-style classes and independent research. Allegheny Distinctions One of the few undergraduate liberal arts programs to offer a special emphasis in Business Economics: finance, accounting, and much more. Close interaction with faculty: in seminars, during Senior Project research, and through research assistantships. Balance of theory and application in curriculum: opportunity to study business economics (finance and accounting) in a liberal arts framework. Practical ‘hands-on’ experience through internships and study tours (see Experiential Learning). Both mainstream and alternative approaches to economics presented in courses representing a broad range of economic areas. Small classes, especially in quantitative areas. Independent research skills, developed through Junior Seminar and Senior Projects, demonstrating to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. Since 1920, the Department has ranked in the top 12% among private, undergraduate institutions in production of eventual Ph.D.s in economics. Cutting edge, technology-based learning in the new Robert Maytum Computer Lab. Endorsements “Senior level courses I took at Allegheny have prepared me very well for my first year in graduate school.” – graduate student, University of Illinois “When it came time to interview [for graduate school] in my senior year, I was confident. The academic environment was intense, with many students on the graduate school track, and I enjoyed that.”- Kevin Baird ’84, vice president, Federal-Mogul Corp. Facilities Strengths Computers: a departmental lab operates on a “student clock” and is open evenings and weekends. It provides various statistical, business, and word processing software on powerful machines, printers and plotters. “Smart classroom”: a new networked classroom enables instructors to integrate traditional teaching methods with new technological advances in the economics field. Student Research and Special Projects Every Alleghenian completes a Senior Project in his or her major field-a significant piece of original work, designed by each student and a faculty advisor, which proves to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major assignment, to work independently, to analyze and synthesize information and to write and speak persuasively. Recent Senior Projects “The Carbonated Soft Drink Industry – A Case Study” “Decision-making Under Risk and Uncertainty and a Defense of Graham and Dodd” “A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of U.S. Life Insurance Companies, 1960 to 1990” “Incentives to Interest Rate Capitalization in International Debt Rescheduling” “An Exploration of Portfolio Insurance” Learning Outcomes for Economics Majors Students who complete an economics major are able to: 1. Think critically and creatively A. Explain the basic elements of economic models. B. Identify important economic actors, organizations, and institutions in an economy and describe their role and impact. C. Understand and interpret statistical measures and techniques 2. Communicate clearly and persuasively as speakers and writers A. Use the spoken and written word, graphs, and mathematics to present economic phenomena and arguments. 3. Invoke multiple ways of understanding to organize and evaluate evidence, and to interpret and make sense of their experiences and the experiences of others. A. Evaluate multiple economic arguments and multiple sources of evidence. 4. Apply their knowledge and learning to engage in informed debate and to analyze and solve problems. A. Propose and model economic hypotheses. B. Collect relevant data for use in qualitative and quantitative research methods C. Evaluate economic arguments and policy proposals using empirical methods. 5. Enter post-graduate life prepared to respond to a wide variety of business situations effectively in order to achieve positive outcomes – also known as business acumen. [-]