Bachelor Degree in Arts in Pennsylvania in USA

See Bachelor Programs in Arts 2017 in Pennsylvania in USA

Arts

Earning a bachelor's degree is achieved by completing the necessary course of study offered by the college or university you enroll in. Completing this study may take three to seven years depending on where you seek your degree.

The USA remains the world’s most popular destination for international students. Universities in the US dominate the world rankings and the country also offers a wide variety of exciting study locations. State university systems are partially subsidized by state governments, and may have many campuses spread around the state, with hundreds of thousands of students.

Pennsylvania is officially known as Common Wealth of Pennsylvania. Most of the higher education institutes in the state follow the commonwealth system of higher education. The easily reachable and healthy recreation facilities in the state make it an ideal place for higher education.

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Bachelor in Digital Media

Eastern Mennonite University
Campus Full time 50 hours September 2017 USA Harrisonburg

The digital media major focuses on the intersection of the internet, digital video, audio and photography within an increasing array of delivery systems. [+]

Bachelors in Arts in Pennsylvania in USA. The Visual and Communication Arts Department (VACA) offers majors in studio art, art education, communication, digital media and photography. These majors prepare students to pursue professional jobs in a variety of careers and to pursue graduate work in an array of programs. Our majors prepare students to move comfortably from the studio, to the gallery, to the field and to the screen in their creative activities. Curious about the vocational possibilities for EMU alums? Visit our VACA careers page.. Majors and Minors Art major and art education endorsement Prepares students who will pursue professional art-related careers, independent art work and graduate work in art. The art major offers a variety of studio arts options after students finish a core curriculum. Communication major Students take a broad group of core courses along with the foundational courses in a variety of electronic media, writing and theory courses. Digital media major Students focus on the intersection of the internet, digital video, audio and photography within an increasing array of delivery systems. Photography major Photography majors build a solid framework in digital photography practice and theory. Students learn studio/field practices, study visual theory, and engage the community through documentary work and conservation photography. Minors: Art Digital Communication Digital Video Production Journalism Photography Teaching Endorsements: Art, Grades PreK-12 Journalism (add-on) Professors Who are Mentors VACA professors push students to go beyond the aesthetic to consider the social and the global aspects of their work so that they can become transformers of cultural and community landscapes. Passionate and Ethical Communication In order to serve in this way, image-makers need more than technical competency. They need to possess a conceptual and aesthetic framework that will allow them to communicate effectively, passionately and ethically. While intellectually rigorous, the VACA faculty seeks to nurture a profound appreciation for the spiritual, emotive and poetic aspects of human existence. The visual arts at EMU help students encounter a much bigger world that cannot always be described in logical terms. Students explore the ethical and cultural problems inherent in mass communication and the artistic endeavor and the increasingly international thrust of communication. Careers in Visual and Communication Arts Careers include artist, art educator, photographer, graphic designer, video producer, web-producer, industrial designer, visual artist, web designer, video editor, journalist, photo-journalist, fine artist, interior designer, communications, art therapist, community arts activist, production craftsperson, CD-ROM developer, advertising, broadcasting, screen printer, photographer, exhibit designer, gallery director, curator, fashion designer, theater set, lighting or sound designer, illustrator, arts administrator, framer, gallery preparator and graduate study in visual art, communication or film and video. See more on our careers page. Digital Media Major The digital media major focuses on the intersection of the internet, digital video, audio and photography within an increasing array of delivery systems. Eastern Mennonite University offers one of the few digital media majors at a Christian college. Our unique program emphasizes proficiency in the interrelated digital media forms of video production, digital photography, graphic design and web design. Students learn electronic field production in documentary and narrative video classes.They practice the disciplines of video editing, lighting, audio production through assignments and real-world projects. Visual and Communication Arts Faculty at Eastern Mennonite University have deep connections to the professional world with projects that have aired on the Discovery Channel, National Geographic and ABC. Whether in person or online, guest lecturers bring expertise from the film and video world. Recent speakers have included the first female steady-cam operator, a National Geographic photographer and a Discovery Channel producer. The EMU digital media major unfolds in the context of our Christian liberal arts community, a multicultural, peace-oriented environment that values effective cross-cultural communication and passionate engagement with the world. Students work on personal projects, study visual theory, and engage the community through documentary work. EMU prepares students for a range of digital media jobs from video production to web design (as well as preparation for further graduate training). Internship opportunities abound in the EMU/Harrisonburg area and many students have completed internships while studying at the Washington D.C. Community Scholars’ Center. Our current students and recent graduates have had opportunities to work on real world projects in Haiti and Kenya. Students have access to our collection of professional HD video cameras, lighting and support equipment for video production.Students also have free access to our collection of Canon digital SLRs and lenses. The Advanced Media Lab, home to our advanced Photoshop, video editing and 2-D animation classes, features fifteen 27 inch (Intel based) iMacs, a large HD display, a Blu-ray projector and a surround sound system. Software includes Final Cut Pro, Adobe Photoshop CS5.5 and After Effects CS5.5. Our intro Digital Media Lab features the latest Adobe CS5.5 Creative Suite and fifteen workstations (21 inch and 24 inch Intel based iMacs) for digital photo editing and web design. Media Coverage VaCa student work has received attention from national and international media. The Washington Post covered our class documentary on the Kurdish community in Harrisonburg, and the BBC ran student photos from the documentary on their Web site [-]

Bachelor in Theatre

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. [+]

Bachelor in Theatre Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. Double majors and self-designed majors encouraged Co-curricular experience expected Major in Theatre Exploring the dramatic expression of a given culture through theory and practice. Nine specified courses and up to four electives (41-49 semester hours, typically 11-13 courses). Minor Theatre: at least 24 semester hours of graded courses in theatre. Department Facts Distinctions Fully supported Senior Project requirement proves to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. The Equity Guest Artist Program Collaborative projects with department faculty and staff A practical, hands-on approach in many courses Touring plays Children’s theatre productions Key Benefits Developing practical and creative communication skills—writing, speaking, acting, directing, audio-visual production, and theatre design. Cultivating critical perspectives on a variety of communicative practices and texts, including speech, politics, popular culture, performance, news, drama, film, television, and advertising. Engaging responsible citizenship and thoughtful professionalism through college and beyond. Student Learning Outcomes Mission Statement The Communication Arts and Theatre Department is dedicated to the creative and critical study of communication, with special emphasis on theatre, rhetoric, and media. The curriculum offers opportunities for the performance, practice, in-depth study, and analysis of texts and techniques in each of these spheres. Students engage in production, performance, and critical cultural studies, with the objective of becoming competent and engaged artists/scholars in their fields. The department’s liberal arts emphasis encourages students to develop habits of engaged citizenship, thoughtful professionalism, and a meaningful private life. [-]

Bachelor in Music

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The strength of Allegheny’s music program can be measured by the way music pervades the campus: one out of every 6 students is actively involved in a vocal or instrumental performance group. The department is deeply committed to the continuing musical education of majors and non-majors alike. [+]

Bachelors in Arts in Pennsylvania in USA. Bachelor in Music The strength of Allegheny’s music program can be measured by the way music pervades the campus: one out of every 6 students is actively involved in a vocal or instrumental performance group. The department is deeply committed to the continuing musical education of majors and non-majors alike. Major and Minor Programs Outcome Through the theory complex: Understanding of the materials of which music is put together. Through the history complex: Understanding of the evolution of music and the mutual influence music and society have on each other. Through the applied and ensemble programs: Understanding of the re-creative process and the self-discipline required to achieve it. Major The major program in Music leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in music and requires the completion of 48 semester hours of coursework including: 12 semester hours of music theory (Music 189, 288, 289, and 400); 12 semester hours of music history (Music 184, 286, 287, 384); 16 semester hours of ensemble participation and applied music at the 400-level on student’s principal instrument (either 10 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 6 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530, or 11 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 5 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530, or 12 semester hours in Music 430-479 and 4 semester hours in Music 430-479 or 530); 2 semester hours of post-tonal music, the Junior Seminar and the Senior Project. Minor Students may elect to pursue a music minor with one of three emphases: music theory, music history, or performance. A minimum of 24 semester hours of coursework is required, distributed as follows: Music Theory emphasis: 12 semester hours of music theory (Music 189, 288, 289, and 400); 6 semester hours of music history (Music 184 and either 286 or 287); 6 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 4 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 2 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Music History emphasis: 6 semester hours of music theory (Music 189 and 288); 12 semester hours of music history (Music 184, 286, 287 and 384); 6 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 4 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 2 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Performance emphasis: 6 semester hours of music theory (Music 189 and 288); 6 semester hours of music history (Music 184 and either 286 or 287); 12 semester hours on student’s principal instrument: 8 semester hours of applied lessons (Music 430-479 or 530) and 4 semester hours of ensemble participation (Music 110-118). Department Facts Key Allegheny Benefits An important part of preparation for graduate study. A balanced background in performance, theory and history. An appreciation of the creative and recreative processes of music. Experience in using research and source materials to independently approach music study. An enhanced appreciation of the importance of the arts in general and in relationship to other disciplines and unusual combinations. Endorsements Approximately 15-20% of the entire student body is involved in music department programs. “Despite pursuing a career outside of music, I have found that the discipline of music theory is applicable in many areas, and that I am more well-rounded in my knowledge than the engineering majors I work with. The most important part of the department is the professors: my music advisor became my mentor, a friend, and taught me things beyond music, things that I use in my everyday life.” – Barbara Anderson Werner ’91, math and music major, now a programmer analyst/software engineer with Logicon Geodynamics, Inc. “During my years at Allegheny, I had the chance to perform as a soloist for the Civic Symphony on two occasions. Through the support and instruction I received from the music department, I was able to do something I had never believed I could do. Through the hours and months of rehearsals, practice and preparation, I discovered that, if I put my mind to it, I could accomplish anything.” – Jennifer Story ’92, psychology major. ” Allegheny provided a nurturing environment that allowed me to examine my areas of interest with outstanding, caring instructors, which eventually led to my changing my major to music and drama. One of my advisors for my two majors was honest about my skills and limitations. Not only did he instruct and motivate me, but he challenged me always to be the best I could be. ” – Steve Sheftz ’83, music and drama major “We were not merely instructed to open our ears to a type of music that we had dismissed, but instead we were shown by example how to appreciate and embrace its universal and sweeping beauty. Rather than memorizing history, biography and theory, we were taught a far greater and more important skill: the art of listening and understanding.” – Reid Ockerman ’95, English major Jonathan Hamilton, ’07 Worship and Creative Arts Director, Erie First Assembly Church Facilities Strengths Electronic music voice lab providing synthesized and sampled sounds, as well as digitized graphing of vocal sounds Technology lab integrated with music curriculum Music lab with computers, synthesizers, and student tutors Department housed in Arnold Hall in the Henderson Campus Center, with classrooms, rehearsal and practice rooms Performance space includes 1,700-seat Shafer Auditorium and 450-seat Ford Memorial Chapel Steinway pianos in concert venues on campus Student Research and Special Projects Every Alleghenian completes a Senior Project in his or her major field-a significant piece of original work, designed by each student and a faculty advisor, that demonstrates to employers and graduate schools the ability to work independently, to analyze and synthesize information, to write and speak persuasively and to complete a major assignment. Recent Senior Projects The Healing Power of Music Analytical Studies of Schoenberg’s Op. 11, 12 and 25 A Study of the Genre ‘Suite’ Exploring the Uses of Electronic Synthesizers in the Creation of Sound Tone Clusters (history and analysis of three works by Ives, Cowell, Bartok) Fantasia (composition for Chamber Choir and survey of contemporary musical notation systems) Chryses Awakening (an original opera) Use of Biofeedback in the Study of Singing Comparison of the Sound Production Mechanism of the Trumpet and the Light Amplification System of the Laser The Effects of Musical Key Changes on the Frontal Lobes in Musicians and Non-Musicians Using Electroencephalogram Alpha Desynchronization The Utilization of MIDI Technology as a Learning, Performing and Composing Tool Vocal Pedagogy Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: An Overview of Vocal Pedagogy An Overview of the History of Music Education in the U.S. A Study of Baroque and Classical Composition with an Emphasis on J.S. Bach and W.A. Mozart The Guitar in the 20th Century The Interrelation of Chopin’s Life and Works: A Case Study of Chopin’s Preludes op. 20 The Making of ‘Deforestation’: The Effectiveness of Music as an Interdisciplinary Approach to Environmental Education (included original piano composition) Selected Student Achievements Six students have recently been featured as soloists with the Civic Symphony. Three others have been guest conductors for Choir and Band concerts. Student was the musical director of three major musicals performed on campus as well as a community Christmas show; also conducted a major concert of the music of St. Saëns, featuring a combined Allegheny orchestra plus professional musicians. Students have been selected to participate the Small College Intercollegiate Band as part College Band Directors National Association Conference at the University of Minnesota, the University of Texas at Denton, the University of Texas at Austin and at Alice Tully Hall, New York City Learning Outcomes Music Department Educational Objectives The study of music enables consumers (listeners), re-creators (performers), and creators (composers) to increase their understanding of both the sounded and written aspects of musical language. Musical Materials Courses These courses concern the sound materials that are used to construct musical works, theirorganization into systems, and their interrelationships, which give rise to musical significance. Students are expected to recognize and reproduce the basic elements both in sound and in notation, both in isolation and in complete musical contexts. Musical Styles Courses These are courses that concern musical style; its historic progression through different times, places, and cultures; and specific composers and works that contributed to that progression. Students are expected to recognize by sound and sight the ways in which musical elements are combined as compositional conventions: within a particular work, within the output of a composer, and by different composers in a particular time or place. Music Performance Courses The courses focus on performance, the actual production of music in sound. Students are expected to apply the physical requirements of playing different instruments to the elements of the score and to interpretative decisions, as the potential of notation becomes the reality of sounded music. Students learn repertoire for soloists individually in applied lessons and repertoire for groups of performers in ensembles. Music Department Learning Outcomes Students are expected to: Understand tools and methods used in musical research and be able to analyze sources accurately and critically; present their research in a clear and coherent manner both orally and in writing Demonstrate a broad understanding of musical materials and styles both as categories of musical significance and with regard to specific works and composers, Demonstrate competence as a performer on the chosen instrument both in solo andensemble repertoire. Opportunities Performance Instrumental Ensembles: Civic Symphony, Jazz Band, Wind Ensemble, Wind Symphony. Vocal: Chamber Choir, College Choir, College Chorus, Women’s Ensemble. Each semester, qualified students are chosen to be concerto soloists with instrumental ensembles, or to give chamber music, solo or joint recitals. Independent Study With one-on-one faculty supervision, students can explore areas not offered in the standard curriculum. Examples of recent Independent Studies include: Synthetic Analogs of Vocal Sound Fourier Analysis of Vocal Formats Form and Analysis Piano Literature from Classical and Romantic Periods Debussy and Ravel Field Study Annually, the department schedules trips to hear visiting artists and performing groups in the nearby cities of Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo. Touring Ensembles Some performing groups, including the Wind Symphony, the Wind Ensemble and the American Music Ensemble, go on tours, usually during semester breaks. Public Events In a typical semester, there are six or seven recitals by music students and faculty as well as three or four performances by visiting artists such as the Kronos Quartet, Richie Havens, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Some guests hold residencies in addition to performing on campus. The Alexander String Quartet, for example, has had annual residencies on campus since 1990. Honors and Prizes Flavia Davis Porter Award, to most talented instrumental musician Morten J. Luvaas Prize to choral music student Ethyl Moore Miller Prize to a junior or senior who shows exceptional progress and ability in musical studies and performance (first Miller Prize recipient was Dr. Richard A. Smith ’50, a chemistry major who has achieved great distinction as a chemist and professor of chemistry) Edith Mead Osborne Prize to the individual who shows marked musical ability, talent, or direction in voice, piano, or organ. The Frederick and Lucille Marantz Memorial Prize, awarded to outstanding piano students The Robert and Bronwell Bond Award awarded to an exceptional talented Allegheny student who will benefit from a rich musical experience away from the campus Other Opportunities Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Band Cooperative projects with public schools Accompaniment for services in local churches Paid teaching assignments with area youth Interested students have opportunities to perform for organizations and events in Meadville vicinity for volunteer or paid services Graduate School About 95% of our majors attend graduate or professional school eventually. About 90% go on directly, with a 100% acceptance rate. Top schools include: Eastman School of Music Cleveland Institute of Music University of Illinois University of Massachusetts Old Dominion University The most popular field of study include: music education, music therapy. Career Data About 10% of our majors seek jobs directly after graduation, and many secure work in a field of interest right away. The most popular fields with a bachelor’s degree: education, military performance. Our graduates are as likely to earn advanced degrees in geology, mathematics or medicine as they are to pursue graduate studies in music. The list of alumni gives some indication of the variety of career paths music majors pursue. [-]

Bachelor in Communication Arts

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. [+]

Bachelor in Communication Arts Major & Minor Programs Exploring the complexities of communication through the study of rhetoric, mass media, and theatre. Double majors and self-designed majors encouraged Co-curricular experience expected Major in Communication Exploring the creative and critical study of human communication, with special emphasis on rhetoric and mass media through theory and practice. Forty-five semester hours (typically 12 courses). Minor Communication: at least 24 semester hours of graded courses in communications. Department Facts Distinctions Fully supported Senior Project requirement proves to employers and graduate schools the ability to complete a major original assignment. The Equity Guest Artist Program Collaborative projects with department faculty and staff A practical, hands-on approach in many courses Touring plays Children’s theatre productions Key Benefits Developing practical and creative communication skills—writing, speaking, acting, directing, audio-visual production, and theatre design. Cultivating critical perspectives on a variety of communicative practices and texts, including speech, politics, popular culture, performance, news, drama, film, television, and advertising. Engaging responsible citizenship and thoughtful professionalism through college and beyond. Endorsements “Some would say that, as a young, independent filmmaker, I face impossible odds. But learning how to do the impossible at Allegheny got me this far.” — Ken Hamm ’92, on completing his first feature-length film, “Moving In/Moving Out,” in 1995 “There’s a wonderful atmosphere that allows you to try out new things without fear of censure, though you can always expect healthy criticism. There is an emphasis on professionalism, and having interested professors makes the department a real individualized event.” — Kim Nichols ’74 Allegheny graduates are regularly recognized for excellence in their fields. Their honors include seven Academy Awards, more than 100 Clios (advertising), more than 30 Emmys (TV) and the Pulitzer Prize (journalism). “Experience is one of the most important aspects of an actor’s work, and a liberal arts college is an excellent place to get the kind of experience needed. You can study a wide variety of subjects and broaden your contact with people in all walks of life.” — Kathy Anne Williams ’77 “The Allegheny experience as a drama major has served me well in a hundred ways.” — Sandra McLaughlin Byers ’58, Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Mellon Bank Corp. “Practical people with a sense of humor are rare among all the self-styled ‘artists’ and theoreticians in theatre. I’m glad there were ‘real’ theatre people at Allegheny.”— Sharon Strite ’72 Student Learning Outcomes Mission Statement The Communication Arts and Theatre Department is dedicated to the creative and critical study of communication, with special emphasis on theatre, rhetoric, and media. The curriculum offers opportunities for the performance, practice, in-depth study, and analysis of texts and techniques in each of these spheres. Students engage in production, performance, and critical cultural studies, with the objective of becoming competent and engaged artists/scholars in their fields. The department’s liberal arts emphasis encourages students to develop habits of engaged citizenship, thoughtful professionalism, and a meaningful private life. Communication Arts Student Outcomes Majors Students who successfully complete a major in Communication Arts are expected to…. Situate works and ideas in historical, cultural, and political contexts. Students should learn to connect concepts and texts (written, oral, visual, performative, live, and mediated) to the contexts in which they are embedded. Analyze critically multiple forms of human expression. Students should be able to critique texts and performances by applying relevant theoretical lenses, comparing and contrasting works, conducting close textual analysis, and offering evaluative judgments. Create meaningful original work. Students should learn, apply, explain, and critically reflect upon methodologies used in creating their own works, including theatrical performances, visual productions, speeches, and written essays. Participate productively in the public sphere. Students should cultivate an awareness of their civic roles and responsibility to various communities. They should critically engage with media and popular culture; they should appreciate and patronize the theatre and performing arts; and they should practice engagement in a range of communication-related activities- on campus, in Meadville, and in their future communities. Minors Students who successfully complete a minor in Communication Arts are expected to… Learn analytical, critical and/or creative approaches to the arts of communication. Demonstrate competence in the field’s basic skills of communication: writing, performing, or creating visual productions. Other Students Students who successfully complete a few courses in Communication Arts are expected to… Cultivate a critical awareness about communication practices they encounter in public and private life. [-]

Bachelor of Arts

Allegheny College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Meadville

The Art Department’s programs are designed to develop a broad intellectual grounding in the traditions of the visual arts through an understanding of Studio Art practice and Art History, coupled with knowledge from other disciplines. Students learn to discriminate between the processes of production, interpretation, and evaluation, and to think creatively about all aspects of artistic problem solving. Through the examination and creation of original works of Art, students learn to contextualize artworks, and understand the relationships between praxis, theory, and history. [+]

Bachelors in Arts in Pennsylvania in USA. Bachelor of Arts The Art Department’s programs are designed to develop a broad intellectual grounding in the traditions of the visual arts through an understanding of Studio Art practice and Art History, coupled with knowledge from other disciplines. Students learn to discriminate between the processes of production, interpretation, and evaluation, and to think creatively about all aspects of artistic problem solving. Through the examination and creation of original works of Art, students learn to contextualize artworks, and understand the relationships between praxis, theory, and history. ART MAJORS Studio Art Progresses from broad exploration of visual art toward specialization in a chosen medium. Art History The visual heritage of Western art and architecture, progressing from surveys (Ancient, Renaissance, American, etc.) to a substantial original research project. Art and Technology An interdisciplinary major shared between the Communication Arts and Art Departments that explores connections between photography, video, and computer art. Double and self-designed majors encouraged. Minor Programs Studio Art • Art History Special minors such as Art & the Environment and Medieval & Renaissance Studies may be considered. Department Facts Distinctions Individualized attention, close student-faculty relationships. Opportunities to integrate art with other disciplines: recent double majors include studio art/physics; studio art/biology; studio art/math; studio art/environmental science; art history/English. Senior Projects demonstrate to employers and graduate schools the ability to define and complete a comprehensive original assignment. Special balance between depth in the major and breadth of overall programs. Important integration of studio art and art history in the curriculum. Upper-level seminars that encourage students to examine art’s connection with politics, economics, and society. Key Benefits Appreciation of the imaginative, expressive range of visual arts. Firm grounding in the fundamentals of art and art history. Understanding of the theoretical and technical issues in the production and interpretation of art. First-hand knowledge of how artists and art historians develop and explore topics. Understanding of the processes and effects of visual communication. Ability to apply critical thinking skills across disciplines. Learning Outcomes Students who successfully complete a major in Art: Studio or Art and Technology will: Actively engage in the production of a body of work that demonstrates conceptual sophistication while also conveying meaning, investigating human experiences, and integrating knowledge from other disciplines and cultural contexts. Make original works of art that demonstrate effective use of design principles, creative problem-solving, and appropriate craftsmanship and technique, in a range of mediums. Interpret and critically evaluate art and media, in writing and in speech, from an informed perspective by carrying out relevant research, contextualizing and interpreting relevant works. Exhibit familiarity with the works and intentions of major artists/designers and movements of the past and the present, both Western and global, and familiarity with contemporary art and critical theory. Develop professional practices through the exhibition of their work in a gallery setting, documentation of work in a portfolio, and proposal writing. Students who successfully complete a minor in Studio Art will: Actively engage in the production of a body of work that demonstrates conceptual sophistication while also conveying meaning, investigating human experiences, and integrating knowledge from other disciplines and cultural contexts. Make original works of art that demonstrate effective use of design principles, creative problem-solving, and appropriate craftsmanship and technique, with focus on one medium. Interpret and critically evaluate art and media, in writing and in speech, from an informed perspective by carrying out relevant research, contextualizing and interpreting relevant works. Exhibit familiarity with the works and intentions of major artists/designers and movements of the twentieth century and with contemporary art and critical theory. Develop professional skills, such as exhibition of their work in a gallery setting, documentation of work in a portfolio, and proposal writing. Students completing a major in Art History will be able to: Demonstrate a general knowledge of the monuments and principal artists of all major art periods of the past, including a broad understanding of the art of the twentieth century; acquaintance with the art history of non-Western cultures, knowledge in greater depth and precision of several cultures and periods in the history of art; a concentration in at least one area at an advanced seminar level; and study of theory and criticism using a variety of analytical critical approaches. Utilize tools and techniques of scholarship, including writing in various formats; speaking in various formats, using appropriate presentation technology; research methods, proper citation methods and legal use of reproductions of imagery, and production of a senior project that considers a single work of art or a narrowly defined body of works in their historical context, analyzed from a distinctive authorial point of view based upon critical and theoretical insights. Integrate and apply knowledge from other disciplines and cultural contexts, including a general knowledge of world history. Adequate mastery of at least one foreign language to support research through the reading of primary source materials is highly recommended. Demonstrate a functional knowledge of the creative process, normally accomplished through one or more foundation or other studio courses. Students completing a minor in Art History will be able to: Demonstrate a general knowledge of the monuments and principal artists of all major art periods of the past, including a broad understanding of the art of the twentieth century; acquaintance with the art history of non-Western cultures; knowledge in greater depth and precision of one period in the history of art; work at an advanced seminar level; and study of theory and criticism using a variety of analytical critical approaches. Utilize tools and techniques of scholarship, including writing in various formats; speaking in various formats, using appropriate presentation technology; research methods, proper citation methods and legal use of reproductions of imagery. Demonstrate a functional knowledge of the creative process, normally accomplished through one or more foundation or other studio courses. Opportunities Allegheny’s Center for Economic and Environmental Development (CEED) sponsors arts and the environment community development art projects. Each project provides paid summer internships for four to six students annually. Student Art Society holds annual activities including unjuried student exhibitions, a Beaux Arts Ball, and field trips. Department-sponsored lecture series, often in conjunction with gallery exhibitions: recent speakers have included artists Christo & Jeanne-Claude; Thomas B. Armstrong, director of the Andy Warhol Museum; and Madeleine Grynsztejn, curator at the San Francisco Museum of Art. Workshops: Recent workshops have focused on art careers, handbuilt ceramics, papermaking, and non-traditional drawing techniques. Field trips: Nearby resources include the Albright-Knox Gallery (Buffalo), the Carnegie Museum (Pittsburgh), the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Erie Art Museum. Meadville Council on the Arts hosts nine regional artists’ exhibits annually. “Signs & Flowers,” a site-specific public art installation created in collaboration with PennDOT; visit ceed.allegheny.edu to view this project. Art education programs with the University of Pittsburgh and Columbia University 3/2 arts management program with Carnegie Mellon’s John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management Experiential Learning Internships Art teaching internship: Carnegie Museum (Pittsburgh) Center for Economic and Environmental Development (CEED) Cleveland School of the Arts Erie Art Museum Johnson-Shaw Stereoscopic Museum Meadville Council on the Arts (MCA) Meadville Historical Society (Baldwin-Reynolds House) The French Creek Project, Meadville, Pa. The Meadville Tribune Vision Media Group, Meadville, Pa. Gallery and art store work-study employment Department research and laboratory assistantships MCA invites student-curated shows as part of art historical research projects [-]

Bachelor Degree in Graphic Design

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. [+]

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. Students select from concentrations in graphic arts or graphic media. The graphic arts track emphasizes visual content development, composition and creation, and is suited to fine arts students who wish to pursue the practice of graphic design as a primary profession. The graphic media concentration—designed to provide students with training in visual communication—incorporates courses like writing and digital media with design classes, giving students a broader base of skills for work in communications and marketing-related professions. No matter which concentration is pursued, the graphic design major prepares students to be effective visual communications professionals. Working in both traditional and digital mediums, students learn to conceptualize, design and produce in a variety of design disciplines, including advertising, packaging, editorial or magazine design, websites and more. Senior capstone work focuses on the development of a student’s portfolio, an essential component in obtaining future employment. The portfolio represents a cohesive body of work that demonstrates the skill and proficiency of the designer. Graduates of the graphic design program are prepared for both immediate design practice and lifelong intellectual and creative growth. Concentration In Graphic Media Course Requirements Concentration in Graphic Media The Graphic Media concentration in Graphic Design focuses on a broader application of Graphic Design, combining courses in artistic content and creation with courses in traditional and social media writing and design. This generates the profile of a student who is very career-focused and, in many instances, may already be working in some capacity in the field. Students in this concentration will develop a foundational mixture of visual and written cultural abilities, and will be more well-rounded but less specialized than students majoring in either Graphic Arts or Communications. These students are mostly on the career track, and will be able to step into a wide variety of jobs that requires both artistic skills and writing content creation. FA 114 Drawing I FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III COM 130 Digital Communication and Design I COM 230 Digital Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic media majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography, and printmaking. Course Requirements Graphic Arts Concentration GRAPHIC ARTS CONCENTRATION Required courses: FA 114 Drawing I DNC 147 Movement as Culture FA 242 2D Design FA 120 Graphic Design l FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II One art history course WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic design majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography or printmaking. Concentration In Graphic Arts The concentration in graphic arts focuses on content development, with an emphasis on visual content development generation, provides an artistic rigor to the traditional graphic design major. Students in this concentration study aesthetics and visual theories of artistic development, and develop strong, creative problem-solving skills. The program’s emphasis on artistic content and creation is suited to students with an interest and background in fine arts. The program is structured to contribute to successful outcomes for graduates in a wide variety of professions, as well for those who desire graduate study in the graphic arts field. Career Opportunities for Graphic Design Career Opportunities Design Disciplines Editorial Design (Magazine/Newspaper) Packaging Branding/Logo Design Advertising Publication Design Signage and Wayfinding Experience Design Exhibition Design Communication Design Website Design Interactive Design Multimedia Creative Direction Potential Employers Design Firms Web/Multimedia Design Firms Advertising Agencies Publishing Houses Magazines Higher Education Government Agencies General Corporate Retail Corporate Television Newspapers In-House Creative Groups Museums/Galleries [-]