Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in genomics

General

Program Description

The objective of the Bachelor of Science degree program with a major in genomics and molecular genetics is to provide a broad foundation in science, with emphasis in genomics and molecular genetics. Although the majority of the course work is prescribed, students have an opportunity to tailor their degree program to their own interests within the field by choosing a suitable course combination from a slate of options. On completion of the program, graduates may apply for certification with the National Registry of Microbiologists of the American Society for Microbiology.

In addition to the general degree requirements of the College of Natural Science, the undergraduate program in genomics and molecular genetics encompasses fundamental training in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and biology. This foundation provides the prerequisites for undertaking the basic courses in genomics and molecular genetics. In order to increase the flexibility of the program, and to provide additional intellectual stimulation, students are encouraged to participate in mentored independent research for at least two, and ideally three or more, semesters. Independent research is available to both Honors College and other students, and often culminates with a report written in manuscript style by the student. This research may fulfill part of the department’s capstone course requirement for the bachelor’s degree with a major in genomics and molecular genetics.

Last updated Oct 2020

Keystone Scholarship

Discover the options our scholarship can give you

About the School

Developing engaged scientists is what we do. Lyman Briggs College is a science-focused college at Michigan State University. Since 1967, we have committed to connecting the natural sciences and mathem ... Read More

Developing engaged scientists is what we do. Lyman Briggs College is a science-focused college at Michigan State University. Since 1967, we have committed to connecting the natural sciences and mathematics with the humanities and social sciences. Why? When we understand sciences in their social and humanistic contexts, we are wiser, more insightful, and more engaged in the world we live in. Read less