Bachelor of Arts in International Economics

General

2 locations available

Program Description

The International Economics degree program equips students with the skills necessary to succeed in the international world of business and economics while emphasizing the skills to develop orderly and critical thinking. It stresses both theoretical and applied concepts, quantitative and qualitative reasoning, communication skills and basic computer literacy. We also expect our students to appreciate and draw from their knowledge of other disciplines, other cultures, and other languages. The pluralistic approach taken by the department allows students to connect the content taught in the economics classes with the occurrences in the real world, thereby preparing them for diverse and challenging work environments. To concretize that connection, the Franklin Frank Program was created to foster service learning and to develop a student "economy" that can provide reflection on the nature of money and job creation. In today’s world of economic uncertainty, a deep understanding of economics is more vital than ever. A major in economics translates into job opportunities in various fields including teaching, government services, finance, banking and insurance, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, public administration, and management. Many of those opportunities also offer important salaries.



Analyze and think critically about economic issues.

The International Economics major prepares students to think critically about economic issues, with special emphasis on international and comparative matters. Greater economic integration and the process of “globalization” of economic and business affairs increasingly call for an international approach to economic education. The growing mobility of people and resources in a world of rapid technological progress in communications requires a greater knowledge and understanding of the differences among people and economic systems that persist even in a highly integrated world. In this spirit, the International Economics degree gives students a solid background in the fundamentals of economic analysis, while adopting a pluralistic approach to economic education that exposes students to a wide spectrum of theories and systems of thought comprising the different facets of the discipline. Special emphasis is given to economic policy issues and economic institutions. Students are made aware of the institutional differences that exist across countries, of their evolution and reforms, through an appreciation of the institutionally based nature of the market system. In this context, the discipline of economics is presented as a logical, and yet practical and creative field. The emphasis in Political Economy provides an opportunity for students to focus on a set of courses that analyze the complex inter-relationships between economics and politics in an increasingly globalized world. Political economy, as an interdisciplinary field of study, explores issues centered on the ways in which political institutions affect the performance of economic systems as well as the ways in which economic interests affect the form of institutions and policies. It entails a variety of approaches, to include the application of economic theories to political choice, historical analysis, and models drawn from game theory applied to political institutions.

International Economics Requirements

International Economics with an emphasis in Political Economy Requirements *All Bachelor of Arts degrees require a total of 120 credits consisting of Core Requirements, Major Requirements, and General Elective courses. Prerequisites may be required for courses outside of the major.Admission CriteriaUndergraduate admission to Franklin University Switzerland is selective, competitive and based primarily on the following:

  • High School Record
  • Personal Recommendations
  • SAT I or ACT Scores

By the time you start your application, you are expected to have completed a solid university preparatory program. We recommend a program that includes four years of English grammar, composition, and literature; three years of a foreign language; three years of history; three years of mathematics, and two years of science. Coursework in areas such as art, computer science, and music is also recommended.

Cost & Fees

  • US Nationals / Permanent Residents and Canadian Nationals
    Academic Tuition Includes Academic Travel (Required, two weeks each semester): $40,800 per year
  • All Other Nationalities
    Academic Tuition Includes Academic Travel(Required, two weeks each semester): CHF 49,100 per year

Lower-level Requirements (21 Credits)
ECN 100 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECN 101 Principles of Microeconomics
ECN 204 History of Economic Thought
ECN 225 Issues and Controversies in Macroeconomics (Intermediate Macroeconomics)
ECN 256 Managerial Economics (Intermediate Microeconomics)
MAT 200 Calculus
MAT 201 Introduction to Statistics Upper-level Requirements (24 Credits) ECN 303 Development Economics
ECN 325 Money, Banking and Financial Markets
ECN 328 International Banking and Finance
ECN 341 International Trade

Four of the following:

ECN 305 Economics of the European Union
ECN 320 Game Theory, Information, and Contracts
ECN 330T Neo-liberal India: Globalization and Development
ECN 350 Industrial Economics
ECN 355 Political Economy: Theories and Issues
ECN 387 Introduction to Econometrics
ECN 490 Senior Research Project in International Economics
ECN 492 Internship in International Economics
ECN 497 Special Topics Research Seminar in Economics and Finance Lower-level Requirements (24 Credits) ECN 100 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECN 101 Principles of Microeconomics
ECN 204 History of Economic Thought
ECN 225 Issues and Controversies in Macroeconomics (Intermediate Macroeconomics)
ECN 256 Managerial Economics (Intermediate Microeconomics)
POL 101 Introduction to International Relations
MAT 200 Calculus
MAT 201 Introduction to Statistics Upper-level Requirements (27 Credits) ECN 341 International Trade
ECN 355W Political Economy: Theories and Issues

Two of the following

ECN 303 Development Economics
ECN 305 Economics of the European Union
ECN 320 Game Theory, Information, and Contracts

Three of the following

ENV 210 Natural Disasters, Catastrophes, and the Environment
HIS 310 The Cold War
HIS 330 East Asia and the Pacific,1904-2012: Empires, Revolutions, and Modernity
HIS 355 The World and the West in the Long 19th Century
POL 302 Political Philosophy
POL 321 International Organization
POL 376 International Environmental Politics
POL 377 International Political Economy
POL 378 International Politics of Energy

Two additional courses

ECN 325 Money, Banking and Financial Markets
ECN 328 International Banking and Finance
ECN 330T Neo-liberal India: Globalization and Development
ECN 350 Industrial Economics
ECN 387 Introduction to Econometrics
ECN 490 Senior Research Project in International Economics
ECN 492 Internship in International Economics

Tuition and Fees

US nationals or permanent residents / Canadian nationals

Cost of Attendance

The actual cost of attendance will vary depending on circumstances, based on how far you have to travel to reach Franklin, the choices you make regarding meals and housing, and more. The costs can be broken into Direct vs. Indirect costs (see below).

Direct Costs

These will appear on the billing statement each semester and may vary based on the cost of housing and meal plan the student chooses. These costs include tuition, university fees, room, and board as well as Swiss health insurance. Exact amounts or averages for these costs (for example for housing or insurance) are provided below.

Tuition and Fees Per Semester Per Year
Academic Tuition
Includes Academic Travel
(Required, two weeks each semester)
$20,400 $40,800
Annual University Fees $710 $1,420
Orientation Fee
(new incoming students only)
$500 $500
Housing and Meals
Average Residence Hall $5,045 $10,090
Meal Plan
(required for all first-year students)
$1,600 $3,200
Health Insurance
Average Insurance for Non-Swiss citizens* $790 $1,580

*Swiss law requires that all students are covered by Swiss medical insurance. The cost varies according to the age of the student. For information regarding the cost of Swiss medical insurance for 2017-2018 please see Health and Counseling.

Indirect Costs

These costs are incidental to the student’s attendance and are fully managed by the student and their family. These costs include travel costs to/from Franklin each semester, the purchase of books and supplies as well as personal costs for weekend travel, toiletries, and such. Each family can reduce these costs by planning travel early, sending care packages from home that include lower-priced toiletries, buying used books and more.

Typical Expenses Per Semester Per Year
Books and other materials $700 $1,400
Travel to and from campus (average cost of an intercontinental flight) $1,000 $2,000
Average cost for personal expenses, off-campus meals, independent travel (based on student surveys) $1,500 $3,000

Total Average Cost of Attendance

Based on the above estimates and average costs, the typical total cost of attendance for a non-Swiss, new incoming undergraduate student (e.g. a first-year undergraduate student, incoming study abroad student or transfer student) coming from the US or Canada would calculate as follows:

Average Direct Costs Average Indirect Costs Total
First Semester $29,045 $3,200 $32,245
Second Semester $28,545 $3,200 $31,745

Non - US or Canadian national or a permanent US resident

Cost of Attendance

The actual cost of attendance will vary depending on circumstances, based on how far you have to travel to reach Franklin, the choices you make regarding meals and housing, and more. The costs can be broken into Direct vs. Indirect costs (see below).

Direct Costs

These will appear on the billing statement each semester and may vary based on the cost of housing and meal plan the student chooses. These costs include tuition, university fees, room, and board as well as Swiss health insurance. Exact amounts or averages for these costs (for example for housing or insurance) are provided below.

Tuition and Fees Per Semester Per Year
Academic Tuition
Includes Academic Travel
(Required, two weeks each semester)
CHF 24,550 CHF 49,100
Annual University Fees CHF 710 CHF 1,420
Orientation Fee
(new incoming students only)
CHF 500 CHF 500
Housing and Meals
Average Residence Hall CHF 5,045 CHF 10,090
Meal Plan
(required for all first-year students)
CHF 1,600 CHF 3,200
Health Insurance
Average Insurance for Non-Swiss citizens* CHF 790 CHF 1,580

*Swiss law requires that all students are covered by Swiss medical insurance. The cost varies according to the age of the student. For information regarding the cost of Swiss medical insurance for 2017-2018 please see Health and Counseling.

Indirect Costs

These costs are incidental to the student’s attendance and are fully managed by the student and their family. These costs include travel costs to/from Franklin each semester, the purchase of books and supplies as well as personal costs for weekend travel, toiletries, and such. Each family can reduce these costs by planning travel early, sending care packages from home that include lower-priced toiletries, buying used books and more.

Typical Expenses Per Semester Per Year
Books and other materials CHF 700 CHF 1,400
Travel to and from campus (average cost of an intercontinental flight) CHF 1,000 CHF 2,000
Average cost for personal expenses, off-campus meals, independent travel (based on student surveys) CHF 1,500 CHF 3,000

Total Average Cost of Attendance

Based on the above estimates and average costs, the typical total cost of attendance for a non-Swiss, new incoming undergraduate student (e.g. a first-year undergraduate student, incoming study abroad student or transfer student) coming from the US or Canada would calculate as follows:

Average Direct Costs Average Indirect Costs Total
First Semester CHF 33,195 CHF 3,200 CHF 36,395
Second Semester CHF 32,195 CHF 3,200 CHF 35,395

Scholarships & Financial Aid

At Franklin, we see financing your education as an investment and partnership among you, your family, and the University. About 70 percent of Franklin students receive financial aid in a variety of forms, such as need- and merit-based scholarships, government and private aid and engagement incentives. Franklin offers scholarships, financial aid, and other initiatives, and various external programs are available based on citizenship and need assessment. Together we will create your financial aid package and carefully guide you through your financing options.

Need-based Aid

Students of all nationalities are encouraged to apply for financial aid. Information about how and when to apply, various aid programs available and eligibility is available in our dedicated section on Financial Aid.

Scholarships and Merit Awards

Merit scholarships are given to students who have demonstrated high academic achievement and are renewed each year, for four years. These scholarships are automatically awarded at the time of admission and are not based on need or family income. Priority is given to students applying for admission by the December 1, 2017, deadline. After December 1, we may continue to award merit scholarships, if funds are still available. For more information, students are advised to contact our office in Lugano.

Below is a range of awards available for the incoming class of Fall Semester 2018.

Merit Award Amounts for US Students
(US dollars)
Merit Award Amounts for Students outside of the US
(Swiss francs)
$22,000 CHF 28,500
$18,000 CHF 24,500
$16,000 CHF 22,500
$12,000 CHF 18,500
Up to $5000 Up to CHF 5000

Swiss Matura Initiative

Specific financial incentives are available for students holding a Swiss national high school diploma (Matura).

Starting with the 2016-17 academic year, Franklin University Switzerland offers students holding a Swiss national high school diploma ('Matura') the opportunity to earn a Bachelor degree in a discipline of their choice in a program designed just for them.

Life-long Learning Scholarship Program

The Life-Long Learning Scholarship Program (L.L.L.S.) supports students by preparing them to be career-ready upon graduation from Franklin, not only with regard to academic foundations in their respective disciplines but also by providing them with skills that are essential in public and private sector employment in a wide variety of settings. By participating in the Life-Long Learning Scholarship program, students will experience a strong sense of engagement with the University, develop leadership skills, and have the opportunity to learn and develop practical skills in a number of fields and areas.

L.L.L.S. Program Eligibility for Students

  1. All undergraduate students enrolled at Franklin University Switzerland with full-time status (a minimum of four-semester courses) may apply for an L.L.L.S. position.
  2. A cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher is required to be eligible for the L.L.L.S. program.
  3. All applicants MUST have an account in good standing with the University in order to be eligible for the L.L.L.S. program.
  4. Resident Assistants are eligible for L.L.L.S. positions for a maximum of 5 hours per week and only with permission from their supervisors.

L.L.L.S. Position Levels

The L.L.L.S. positions are classified into various levels. First-year students start with simpler, service-oriented positions and progress to more challenging positions with greater responsibility and increased complexity during their upper-class years.

  • Tier I: Task-oriented. Entry-level students learn basic career skills and experienced students have proven to be dependable. Students may have time to study while conducting projects after their assigned tasks have been completed.
  • Tier II: Students learn project management and more advanced career skills. Experienced students have the capacity to train and supervise beginner level students. Students do not have time to study during their assigned projects.
  • Research Assistant or other Academic Assistant Position: Students perform basic to advanced academic research and complete academic projects. Students do not have time to study during their assigned projects.

The L.L.L.S. program allows students to experience a strong sense of engagement with the University, develop leadership skills, and have the opportunity to learn and develop practical skills in a number of fields and areas. Students are expected to maintain communication with their supervisor about the schedule, tasks, and deadlines. Supervisors are expected to provide training for L.L.L.S. students to fully acclimate the student to the new role.

L.L.L.S. Administration

At the beginning of each semester, information about open L.L.L.S. positions and the application process is sent to students' Franklin email accounts. The L.L.L.S. Program is coordinated by the Dean of Student Life and Engagement in collaboration with the Vice President for Finance and Administration and the Franklin Bursar.

Last updated December 2017

About the School

Franklin University Switzerland is education that explores and goes beyond boundaries. It is a school where nationalities and cultural perspectives meet and create unique experiences. It is a learning ... Read More

Franklin University Switzerland is education that explores and goes beyond boundaries. It is a school where nationalities and cultural perspectives meet and create unique experiences. It is a learning method that incorporates travel and interdisciplinary study into the core of the curriculum. We refer to our methodology and mission as the international imperative in education. Read less
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