Bachelor of Arts in Communications & Media

General

Program Description

How can humans use symbols, images, and sounds to create meaning that can be shared among groups and individuals? At what point do persuasive publications become propaganda? How are new social media impacting family dynamics in North America? Why will people share their private lives with strangers, on the condition that the stranger holds a microphone?

In Communications and Media studies, students will be given a background in communications theory, as well as the practical skills they need to be effective in the workplace. Throughout this process, students will be encouraged to confront the field's big questions about meaning, spreading information and ideas, the power of voice, and interactions between faith and professional practice.

Both the three-year and the four-year Bachelor of Arts with a major in Communications and Media provide a breadth of exposure to the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, and include significant depth in Communications/Media. These degrees prepare students well for any area of employment with valuable skills—oral communication, writing, technical abilities, organizational skills, and analytical thinking. The three-year program is designed for students who wish to have a strong interdisciplinary basis for further technical training. A three- or a four-year B.A. in Communications and Media also serves as a sound basis for launching into professional careers in organizations that work in creative communications, community development, non-governmental agencies, religious/denominational organizations, social service agencies, and so on.

Tuition & Fees

  • CAD 13000 / year
  • CAD 15000 / year (International students)
Last updated February 2018

About the School

The origins of CMU go back to the early 1990s when people from the business community and from four Mennonite colleges in Manitoba—CMBC, Concord College, Steinbach Bible College and Menno Simons Colle ... Read More

The origins of CMU go back to the early 1990s when people from the business community and from four Mennonite colleges in Manitoba—CMBC, Concord College, Steinbach Bible College and Menno Simons College—met to talk about inter-Mennonite co-operation in higher education. This led to formal discussions among the colleges, beginning in 1995. Steinbach Bible College withdrew from the process in 1996. Read less