Bachelor of Applied Science in Microelectronic Manufacturing

General

Program Description

Bachelor of Applied Science in Microelectronic Manufacturing

The Microelectronic Manufacturing program prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills to design, assembly, prototyping, and manufacturing of printed circuit boards (PCB) used in electronic assembly as well microelectronic packaging and MEMS sensors. Includes hands-on machine operation of equipment used in high volume electronic assembly and microelectronic packaging, use of software for designing PCB layout and bills of materials, instruction in manufacturing, quality control principles and lean lite, instruction in programming of programmable logic controllers (PLC), and engineering analysis of the physical design and electronic function of PCB.

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Program Learning Outcomes

The following are the as-listed outcomes for the AAS in MEMS.

  • Demonstrate knowledge, techniques, technical skills, and the use of tools needed in the field.
  • Demonstrate a high standard of professional ethics, attitudes, and values.
  • Communicate effectively and work collaboratively with others.
  • Work productively as an individual and as a member of a problem-solving team in an engineering environment.

Objectives

An accreditable program will prepare graduates with technical and managerial skills necessary for entry into the industry of the design, manufacturing, process optimization, inspecting, testing, and troubleshooting of PCB and related microelectronic products. Graduates of the associate degree programs are expected to have strengths in the knowledge of equipment operations, assembly, testing, and troubleshooting of prototyping a PCB and associated microelectronic components, while baccalaureate degree graduates are expected to be prepared for careers in design, engineering process optimization, and management within the field of microelectronic manufacturing including the operation, programming, and troubleshooting of high-volume PCB manufacturing equipment, inspection, troubleshooting, repair, and technical reporting on manufactured PCB as well as quality, drafting, continuous improvement, lean manufacturing, and six sigma.

Program Learning Objectives

In addition to the outcomes required of the associate degree, graduates of baccalaureate degree programs must demonstrate knowledge and hands-on technical competency in:

  • An ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities;
  • An ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies;
  • An ability to conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes;
  • An ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives;
  • An ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;
  • An ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems;
  • An ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;
  • An understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development;
  • An understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity;
  • Knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context;
  • A commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement;
  • An ability to apply the following to the solution of manufacturing problems to achieve manufacturing competitiveness: (a) materials and manufacturing processes; (b) product design process, tooling, and assembly; (c) manufacturing systems, automation, and operations; (d) statistics, quality and continuous improvement, and industrial organization and management;
  • An ability to successfully solve manufacturing problems using both technical and non-technical skills in an integrating capstone experience that illustrates student competencies;
  • An ability to pass the Surface Mount Technology Association Process Certification Exam;
  • An ability to perform in a microelectronic manufacturing or engineering environment as evidenced by an internship or co-op for a minimum number of 300 paid hours.

Curriculum

First Year

Fall Semester

  • ELCT 111: Electrical Circuits I - 3 hours
  • ELCT 115: Fabrication Process for Electronics - 2 hours
  • MTHM 121: Technical Mathematics I (1) - 4 hours
  • MEMS 122: Introduction to Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) - 4 hours
  • SDEV 101: College 101 (2) - 1 hour
  • TECN 111: Technical Problem Solving - 3 hours

Hours: 17

Spring Semester

  • CADD 111: Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting (3) - 2 hours
  • CADD 216: Introduction to 3D Modeling and Printing - 1 hour
  • DFAB 111: Introduction to Personal Fabrication - 1 hour
  • ELCT 121: Digital Electronics (1) - 4 hours
  • MEMS 132: MEMS Packaging (1) - 3 hours
  • MTHM 168: Statistics (1) - 3 hours

Hours: 14

Second Year

Fall Semester

  • CHMY 171: General Chemistry I - 5 hours
  • ELCT 233: Electronic Devices I (3) - 4 hours
  • ENGL 161: College Composition I - 3 hours
  • MEMS 211: Micro-Fabrication Processing (1) – 3 hours
  • MEMS 287: Work-Based Learning I - MEMS (1), (4) - 1 hour

Hours: 16

Spring Semester

  • ENGL 164: College Composition II with Technical Topics (1) - 3 hours
  • MEMS 221: Micro-System Capstone Project (1) - 3 hours
  • MEMS 288: Work-Based Learning II - MEMS (1) - 1 hour
  • Arts and Humanities Elective - 3 hours
  • Social Sciences Elective - 3 hours

Hours: 13

Third Year

Fall Semester

  • AETC 111 Robotics/Automated Manufacturing - 3 hours
  • ELCT 112: Electrical Circuits II (3), (5) - 4 hours
  • MEMS 311: PCB and Flex Design (1) - 3 hours
  • PHYC 150: General Physics I (1) - 4 hours
  • TECN 115: Industrial Blueprint Reading - 2 hours

Hours: 16

Spring Semester

  • AETC 121: Programmable Logic Controllers (5) - 3 hours
  • ELCT 221: Microcontrollers (1), (5) - 4 hours
  • MEMS 321: PCB Assembly (1) - 3 hours
  • MEMS 387: Work-Based Learning – MEMS – 1 hour
  • QLTY 122: Basic Quality Tools and Applications (1) - 3 hours
  • TECN 245: Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (1) - 2 hours

Hours: 16

Fourth Year

Fall Semester

  • CADD 213: Introduction to Solidworks (1), (5) - 3 hours
  • ELCT 234: Electronic Devices II (1), (5) - 4 hours
  • MEMS 411; PCB Inspection & Rework (1) – 3 hours
  • PSYH 151: or SOCY 151G: Introduction to Psychology or Introduction to Sociology - 3 hours
  • QLTY 226: Six Sigma Basic Tools & Techniques (1) - 3 hours

Hours 16

Spring Semester

  • MEMS 421: Electronic Assembly - Senior Design (1) - 3 hours
  • MEMS 487: Work-Based Learning MEMS (1) - 1 hour
  • QLTY 224: Lean Management Principles & Practices (3) - 3 hours
  • QLTY 241: ISO 9001 (1) - 2 hours
  • Arts and Humanities Electives - 6 hours
  • Social Science Elective -3 hours

Hours: 18

Total Hours: 126

(1) Indicates that this course requires a prerequisite.

(2) A student must register for the orientation course when enrolling for more than six credit hours per semester or any course that would result in an accumulation of 13 or more credit hours.

(3) Indicates that this course has a prerequisite or may be taken concurrently.

(4) This course offers an opportunity for experiential learning.

(5) Indicates that this course is at a 300 level at other universities.

Arts and Humanities Electives

3 hours each

  • ARTS 243G - Art History I
  • ARTS 244G - Art History II
  • ARTS 245G - World Art
  • ARTS 246 - History of Photography
  • ARTS 254 - History of American Architecture
  • ENGL 251 - American Literature I
  • ENGL 252 - American Literature II
  • ENGL 253G - Introduction to World Literature
  • ENGL 254G - Introduction to Hispanic Literature
  • ENGL 255G - Introduction to Fiction
  • ENGL 257G - Introduction to Poetry
  • ENGL 259G - Introduction to Drama
  • ENGL 261G - Masterpieces of British Literature I
  • ENGL 262G - Masterpieces of British Literature II
  • ENGL 266G - African American Literature
  • ENGL 269G - Introduction to Shakespeare
  • HUMS 151G - Introduction to Humanities
  • HUMS 261G - Introduction to Great Books: Ancient World to the Renaissance
  • HUMS 262G - Introduction to Great Books: Early Modern to the 20th Century
  • HUMS 271G - Introduction to Mythology
  • HUMS 274 - Film Appreciation
  • MUSC 261G - Music Appreciation
  • MUSC 262G - Music as a World Phenomenon
  • PHLY 165 - Bioethics
  • PHLY 262G - Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
  • RELG 181G - Introduction to World Religions
  • RELG 261 - Religion in America
  • RELG 262G - Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
  • THTR 151G - Introduction to Theater

Social Science Electives

3 hours each

  • ECNM 151 - Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECNM 152 - Principles of Microeconomics
  • HSTR 151G - Civilization I
  • HSTR 152G -Civilization II
  • HSTR 161 - United States I
  • HSTR 162 - United States II
  • HSTR 171G - The World since 1900
  • HSTR 252G - Women in World History
  • HSTR 267G - African American Heritage
  • PLSC 156 - American National Government
  • PSYH 151 - Introduction to Psychology
  • SOCY 151G - Introduction to Sociology

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Tuition and Costs

How much does it cost to attend LCCC?

Many factors are considered when determining how much it costs to attend college.

When determining a student’s eligibility for financial aid, many factors are taken into account including enrollment status, residency status, dependency status, cost of attendance, etc. A student’s Cost of Attendance for financial aid determination includes directly billed expenses (tuition and fees) and “indirect” expenses for items such as books, supplies, transportation to and from campus, normal monthly household expenses and a small amount for personal expenses. These amounts are estimated per year at LCCC as:

  • Tuition and Fees:
    • Lorain county resident: $134.04 per credit hour.
    • Out-of-county resident: $159.22 per credit hour.
    • Out-of-state resident: $310.79 per credit hour.
  • Books and supplies: $ 350 – $1,500
  • Transportation: $ 1,000 – $1,600
  • Monthly Household expenses: $ 2,200 – $3,800
  • Miscellaneous Personal Expenses: $ 1,000

Where laboratory, special facilities or services are required to accommodate instructional needs, a special fee may be assessed.

Last updated Jun 2020

About the School

Founded in 1963, Lorain County Community College has been helping local people get the training and education they need to live their best life for more than 50 years.

Founded in 1963, Lorain County Community College has been helping local people get the training and education they need to live their best life for more than 50 years. Read less