Bachelor in International Liberal Arts: Performing Arts

International College of Liberal Arts - Yamanashi Gakuin University

Program Description

Bachelor in International Liberal Arts: Performing Arts

International College of Liberal Arts - Yamanashi Gakuin University

Bachelor in International Liberal Arts: Performing Arts

Western Film & Theater

This course serves as an introduction to the theoretical, social and artistic traditions which are key to an understanding of the dramatic arts of the Western stage and screen. It will allow students access to a broad range of work, across the centuries, whilst encouraging them to think about such material as part of a greater, overall understanding of Western art/society in general.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) identify the key terms, people and traditions which are important in the history of theatre and film-making in the West, (ii) know how to access and read primary sources to adopt a critical perspective on performing art, identify the concerns and intentions of secondary sources, and develop an awareness of different approaches to make sense of such art, (iii) understand how both film and theatre is both an artistic and social construct, carrying messages that go beyond their own time or place, (iv) engage thoroughly in writing about the key moments in art history by putting forward an argument and developing it in a clear and coherent manner, and (v) learn how to articulate and refine ideas in discussions and presentations.

Japanese Film & Theater

This course serves as an introduction to the theoretical, social and artistic traditions which are key to an understanding of the dramatic arts of the Japanese stage and screen. It will allow students access to a broad range of work, across the centuries, whilst encouraging them to think about such material as part of a greater, overall understanding of Japanese art/society.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) identify the key terms, people and traditions which are important in the history of Japanese theatre and film-making, (ii) know how to access and read primary sources to adopt a critical perspective on performing art, identify the concerns and intentions of secondary sources, and develop an awareness of different approaches to make sense of such art, (iii) understand how both film and theatre is both an artistic and social construct, carrying messages that go beyond their own time or place, (iv) engage thoroughly in writing about the key moments in art history by putting forward an argument and developing it in a clear and coherent manner, and (v) learn how to articulate and refine ideas in discussions and presentations.

Manga & Anime Studies

This course serves as an introduction to the history, social impact and artistic traditions which are key to an understanding of the important role of anime and manga in modern Japanese history. It will introduce students to the key players in the story of the development of Japanese popular media culture, and give them an opportunity to engage directly with the processes of production, as well as exploring the unique characteristics of Japan’s most visible cultural export.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) identify the key terms, people and traditions which are important in the history of Japanese visual media culture, (ii) know how to access and read primary sources to adopt a critical perspective on Japanese popular culture, identify the concerns and intentions of secondary sources, and develop an awareness of different approaches to make sense of such art, (iii) understand how comics and animation are tied into other forms of culture, and represent more than the disposable media of the young, (iv) engage thoroughly in writing about the key moments in Japanese popular culture history by putting forward an argument and developing it in a clear and coherent manner, and (v) learn how to articulate and refine ideas in discussions and presentations.

Film History

This course serves as an in-depth exploration of the key players, economics, social impact and various genres which are key to an understanding of the history of film as a form of performing art. It will help students who have some background knowledge of the subject matter, to see the art of the screen from a variety of different contexts, and demonstrate that the history of the ‘silver screen’ is also the greatest legacy to mankind of the 20th Century.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) apply previously acquired an understanding of film as a historical object to a broader and more global scope, (ii) have developed the ability to analyze film directly, as well as primary sources on film and express a refined perspective on the concerns and intentions of different film-makers/film-consumers, (iii) understand how film was/is tied into the history of the 20th century, and how such media helped/helps shape our own view of an increasingly global society, (iv) be able to produce a detailed critique of a specified period, genre, social context and/or director, and (v) refine their presentation skills further through open discussion and formal debate within the class.

Japanese Traditional Theater

This course serves as an in-depth exploration of the key people, politics, social impact and various forms which are key to an understanding of the history of theater as a form of performing art in Japanese history. It will help students who have some background knowledge of the subject matter, to see the Japanese stage arts from a variety of different contexts, and demonstrate that the history of the theater in this country is rooted in a powerful, even mystical form of reverence for the Kami.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) apply previously acquired understanding of theater as a historical object to an understanding of the key forms of art (Kabuki, Noh, Bunraku, Kagura, etc.), (ii) have developed the ability to analyze theater arts directly, as well as primary sources on the stage and express a refined perspective on the concerns and intentions of different playwrights/actors, (iii) understand how the Japanese stage was/is tied into the history of the country, and how such material helped/helps shape our own view of Japan as a nation, (iv) be able to produce a detailed critique of a specified period, genre, social context and/or actors, and (v) refine their presentation skills further through open discussion and formal performance within the class.v

Comparative Theater Aesthetics

This advanced course will allow students to explore, in depth, the works of some of the greatest minds of the classical stage, both in Japan and in the West. Primarily this course is dedicated to the aesthetics of theater (design, costume, performance, music, etc.) but it also tackles the social and political frame into which art was placed, as a way of demonstrating the way in which all art is developed as a response to the concerns of our own lives.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) recognize, understand and be able to explain the symbols and significance of several different theatre traditions, (ii) have further perfected the ability to analyze theater arts directly and be able to present refined opinions on the intent of such masters as Zeami and Shakespeare, (iii) understand how the beauty of any given ‘national stage’ was/is tied into the aesthetics of more than just itself, but was/is an extension of a collective ‘character’ in which the voices of many can be heard, even to this day, (iv) be able to produce a comprehensive, and critical thesis on their chosen theater form, and (v) refine their presentation skills further through open discussion and contested debate within the class.

Seminar (Performing Arts)

The role of the seminar is to support the successful completion of the Graduation Research Project (GRP), a graduation requirement for all students. In this seminar, we will look at the theme that each student has chosen for the Writing-Across-Curriculum (WAC) program, upon which the GRP is based, through the lens of theories, paradigms, and concepts from the field of Performing Arts. Students will take turns presenting their research at different stages of their thesis development. Their peers, under the supervision of the seminar instructor, will discuss and critique each presentation to give the presenters an opportunity to refine their own thesis. Through such interactions, peers will learn how to avoid problems with their own projects.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students will have: (i) analyzed an important world issue from the perspective of art critic, (ii) conducted at a high level of proficiency their own research project, and (iii) written a high-quality graduation thesis in their own chosen area.

Workshop: Acting I

This course explores Stanislavski-based principles and the Drama Method to develop a basic grasp of the fundamentals of acting. This course will use voice, speech, and physical exercises, improvisation, text/subtext analysis and scene work to develop a sense of self-awareness, truthful spontaneity, and the ability to "Talk and Listen" with others on stage within specific theatrical circumstances. The interdisciplinary skills of critical thinking and analysis, communication, economy of expression and movement, and detail-oriented observation will merge in the creative and imaginative world of the stage. Students will explore character and scene circumstances as defined by socio-economic status, cultural/political factors, tactics, objectives, obstacles, and style. Using focus and concentration exercises and play, students will learn to perform simply and honestly, alone and with fellow actors.

Objectives

At the end of this course, you will be able to (i) analyze a character’s given circumstances within a script to prepare playable objectives and attributes, (ii) build trust, ease and confidence performing and speaking in front of others, and (iii) gain new perspectives by making connections between acted roles (character, topic) and one’s own academic field and studies.

Workshop: Acting II

This class is designed for students with a deeper interest in acting and will focus on monologues and audition techniques. We will prepare the students for auditioning and acting alone on stage by preparing and rehearsing two contrasting classical and contemporary monologues. Students will explore comedic and dramatic texts and analyze character and script situations using techniques established by Stanislavsky. Students will participate in theater games and exercises that open up the actor creatively and physically and train the body, mind, and voice. We will also work on solo and two-person cold-reading auditions.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students should be able to: (i) instantly deliver effective and visceral performances of two contrasting monologues in both classic and contemporary styles, (ii) read and understand text and subtext in a script and analyze the given situations (who, when, where, why, what and how) necessary for complete character delineation, and use the "what-if" philosophy to arrive at a playable and believable character, (iii) learn how to conduct oneself professionally and confidently in the standard audition scenario,(iv) present themselves with vocal confidence and physical ease in public speaking or lecture arenas, and (v) formulate and communicate ideas critically, creatively and academically among peers.

Workshop: Directing

This course gives hands-on experience directing theatre pieces based on Stanislavskian principles of creating a psychologically real performance. The course will introduce script analysis, including themes, imagery, historical/political/socio-economic factors and characters. We’ll work to formulate the vision and concept of the director’s world and explore stage composition and picturization in a visceral and exciting way. Students, as directors, will gain experience running auditions, casting and running rehearsals and will gain the vocabulary necessary to work with actors. Students will present a 10-minute play under their own direction. Interdisciplinary skills developed in this course include text analysis, research and critical thinking; communication; people and time management; and team collaboration toward a common creative goal.

Objectives

At the end of this course, students will be able to (i) analyze a script and direct its presentation on all levels, understand the intention of the script and yourself as the director and create a clear purpose and vision for your production, (ii) speak the language of the theatre while directing actors and efficiently communicate ideas to your production team (stage manager, set, props, lighting, etc.), and (iii) use research and analysis skills to make real-world connections between the content of your productions and your academic studies.

Workshop: Noh Theater

This course covers the history and techniques of the noh drama, which has a 650-year history in Japan and has been designated an Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO. Utai (Noh Chanting) forms the foundation of noh, and it plays the role of the script and song. Through Utai, one expresses the feelings, emotional landscape of the drama, and through which one learns correct posture and abdominal breathing. Meanwhile, students will also learn Mai, or the dance movements of noh, which adds movements. By acquiring Kamae (pose, style) and Suriashi (sliding feet), students will be enabled to perform an assigned song as the leading actor, and learn the highly refined movements which characterized the graceful elegance of noh. The workshop will conclude with a performance entirely by students, in which they will demonstrate what they have learned in Utai and Mai. Since this course involves tutorials for beginning students, the number of students is limited to 10.

Objectives

By practicing in the designated performance piece, students will gain a first-hand knowledge of noh, as well as learn the fundamentals of a beautiful pose and performance. Repeated practice leads to refinement and deepening of expression, and through this, students will deepen their understanding of the special world which noh drama creates from Mu (Marvelous Emptiness). Students will acquire skills equals to those who belong to this university’s Koten Geino Kenkyukai (Yamanashi Gakuin Society for the Study of Traditional Arts) where people practice noh regularly. This course conducted entirely in Japanese.

Instructors:

Darren Ashmore

Adjunct Instructors:

  • Brett Farnsworth
This school offers programs in:
  • English


Last updated January 26, 2018
Duration & Price
This course is Campus based
Start Date
Start date
Apr. 2019
Duration
Duration
Full time
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Price
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Deadline
Locations
Japan - Kōfu
Start date: Apr. 2019
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Dates
Apr. 2019
Japan - Kōfu
Application deadline Request Info
End date Request Info