Bachelor in Economics

General

Read more about this program on the school's website

Program Description

This degree aims to equip students with the tools and frameworks to analyse economic issues, as well as the skills necessary to explore and analyse new issues as they emerge in the current dynamic economic environment.

Topics such as unemployment, inflation house prices and poverty are hotly debated in the media today. Studying Economics at Lincoln gives students the opportunity to develop their awareness of the integrated and multidisciplinary nature of economics around the world.

Fundamental to the subject is a commitment to fostering respect for good academic practice and standards, as well as the confidence to challenge established wisdom.

How You Study

The first year of this course introduces core micro, macro and international economics, together with modules in econometric analysis to give students the opportunity to develop expertise in the statistical techniques used to analyse and interpret economic data.

Intermediate micro and macroeconomics are studied in the second year and are prerequisites for the advanced modules which are covered in year three.

A range of optional modules in the second and third years are designed to and enable students to tailor their learning in line with their interests and career aspirations.

In addition, there is the opportunity to take a year-long work placement after the second year. Work placement can allow students to gain valuable experience and apply their learning in practice. More details regarding the potential costs associated with these placements are outlined in the Features tab.

Contact Hours and Reading for a Degree

Students on this programme learn from academic staff who are often engaged in world-leading or internationally excellent research or professional practice. Contact time can be in workshops, practical sessions, seminars or lectures and may vary from module to module and from academic year to year. Tutorial sessions and project supervision can take the form of one-to-one engagement or small group sessions. Some courses offer the opportunity to take part in external visits and fieldwork.

It is still the case that students read for a degree and this means that in addition to scheduled contact hours, students are required to engage in an independent study. This allows you to read around a subject and to prepare for lectures and seminars through wider reading, or to complete follow up tasks such as assignments or revision. As a general guide, the amount of independent study required by students at the University of Lincoln is that for every hour in class you are expected to spend at least two to three hours in an independent study.

How You Are Assessed

Assessment Feedback

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to students promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Methods of Assessment

The way students are assessed on this course may vary for each module. Examples of assessment methods that are used include coursework, such as written assignments, reports or dissertations; practical exams, such as presentations, performances or observations; and written exams, such as formal examinations or in-class tests. The weighting given to each assessment method may vary across each academic year. The University of Lincoln aims to ensure that staff return in-course assessments to students promptly.

Features

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a model of teaching and learning that encourages academics and undergraduate students to collaborate on research activities. It is a programme committed to learning through doing.

The Student as Producer initiative was commended by the QAA in our 2012 review and is one of the teachings and learning features that makes the Lincoln experience unique.

Entry Requirements

  • GCE Advanced Levels: BBB
  • International Baccalaureate: 30 points overall
  • BTEC Extended Diploma: Distinction, Distinction, Merit
  • Access to Higher Education Diploma: 45 Level 3 credits with a minimum of 120 UCAS Tariff points

Applicants will also need at least three GCSEs to include a grade 5 (B) in Maths, a 4 (C) in English and one further GCSE graded at 4 (C) or above. Equivalent Level 2 qualifications may be considered.

EU and International students whose first language is not English will require English Language IELTS 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each element or equivalent http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/englishrequirements

The University accepts a wide range of qualifications as the basis for entry and will consider applicants who have a mix of qualifications.

We also consider applicants with extensive and relevant work experience and will give special individual consideration to those who do not meet the standard entry qualifications.

Last updated Mar 2020

About the School

Since being opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1996, the University of Lincoln has invested more than £300 million in its buildings and facilities.

Since being opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1996, the University of Lincoln has invested more than £300 million in its buildings and facilities. Read less