Bachelor of Science Degrees in Measurement Science

Compare 7 Bachelor of Science Programs in Measurement Science

After three to five years of intensive studies and completion of all required courses, individuals may earn a Bachelor of Science (BSc), a science-related degree in a particular field of study. It may be a necessary achievement if the graduate wishes to advance to graduate school.

What is a BSc in Measurement Science? Pursuing a degree in measurement science, also known as metrology, allows students to study measurements as they relate to various realms, including scientific, legal and industrial. The courses you will take involve learning about metrological techniques and methods and learning how to apply those concepts to real life scenarios. You will develop personal analytical skills as well as get the training you need to comprehend the strengths and weaknesses of the tools in your field.

Studying measurement science will not only give you knowledge about the theoretical concepts in metrology, but it will also give you the tools you need to apply those concepts in the real world. You will gain vital strengths such as mathematical modeling, calculation, reasoning skills and logical analysis.

Ultimately, the amount you will have to pay for your degree will depend on several factors. The country you are in, the length of your specific program and the specific university will all play a role in the final cost.

Metrology is an essential component in a number of fields, so there is no limit to where you can go with a Bachelor of Science in Measurement Science. A few of the industries you are able to enter include manufacturing, aerospace, energy, government, sports, commerce and many others. Getting into these career paths is difficult on its own, but with proof that you successfully understand the concepts and applications of metrology, you will have numerous opportunities available to you.

Measurement science can be a difficult field to master, but by pursuing a bachelor’s degree, you are on your way to a very successful career. Search for your program below and contact directly the admission office of the school of your choice by filling in the lead form.

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Bachelor of Science in Biology

University of Sioux Falls
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Sioux Falls

In addition to meeting the liberal arts core requirements of the University, you must take at least 32 semester hours of study in biology, along with supporting courses in chemistry, physics and mathematics. [+]

BScs in Measurement Science. With a Biology degree from the University of Sioux Falls, you will be prepared for graduate study in biology; professional programs in medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine; teaching; or other lab-based science careers immediately following graduation. Our faculty bring a wide range of experiences to the classroom and will expose you to different fields within biology. In addition, the biology major includes coursework from chemistry, physics and mathematics, so you will be proficient in a variety of sciences. In addition to meeting the liberal arts core requirements of the University, you must take at least 32 semester hours of study in biology, along with supporting courses in chemistry, physics and mathematics. BIOLOGY REQUIREMENTS Complete the following courses: BIO100 - General Biology BIO203 - General Botany BIO204 - General Zoology BIO222 - Genetics BIO222CT - Genetics **Designated Critical Thinking** BIOLOGY ELECTIVES Complete 16 elective credits in Biology (300 level or higher). BIO302 - Biology of Microorganisms BIO309 - Cell Biology BIO314 - Human Anatomy BIO315 - Human Physiology BIO324 - Ecology BIO380 - Immunology BIO385 - Histology BIO402 - Developmental Biology BIO490 - Advanced Topics/Biology **Designated Honors Course** BIO491 - Independent Study BIO492 - Independent Study CHEMISTRY REQUIREMENTS Complete the following courses: CHE111 - General Chemistry I CHE112 - General Chemistry II CHE121 - Introduction to Chemistry CHE122 - Intro to Organic & Biochemistry PHYSICS REQUIREMENTS Complete the following courses: PHY101 - College Physics I PHY102 - Introductory College Physics PHY201 - University Physics PHY202 - University Physics COLLOQUIUM Complete Colloquium during the four semesters of the junior and senior years; one presentation each year. NSC300 - Science Colloquium MAT OR COM ELECTIVES Complete an elective course from either mathematics or computer science beyond the liberal arts core requirements. COM201 - Intro To Computer Science I COM202 - Intro to Computer Science II COM300 - Numerical Methods COM303 - Introduction to Networking COM306 - Discrete & Algorithmic Math COM310 - Information Systems Analysis COM315 - Organization of Programming Languages COM318 - Database Management Systems COM320 - Structure & Logic Digital Comp COM322 - Operating Systems COM340 - Algorithms & Objects in C++ COM390 - Special Topics COM395 - Internship COM490 - Senior Seminar MAT100 - Problem Solving Seminar MAT115 - Mathematical Modeling for the Liberal Arts MAT201 - Calculus for Applications MAT202 - Finite Math MAT203 - Discrete & Algorithmic Math MAT204 - Calculus I MAT205 - Calculus II MAT222 - Math for Elementary Teachers I MAT223 - Math for Elementary Teachers II MAT233 - Statistics MAT270 - Statistics and Mathematical Functions MAT300 - Numerical Methods MAT302 - Probability and Statistics MAT303 - Foundations of Geometry MAT304 - Linear Algebra MAT305 - Abstract Algebra MAT306 - Discrete & Algorithmic Math MAT310 - Calculus III MAT311 - Differential Equations MAT320 - Introduction to Real Analysis MAT373 - Truth and Beauty: Topics in the Philosphy of Mathematics **Designated Honors Course** MAT390 - Special Topics in Mathemtics MAT406 - Teaching High School Math MAT490 - Senior Seminar MAT491 - Independent Study [-]

BSc Mathematics (Hons)

University of Greenwich
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 6 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Mathematics is one of the most fascinating and intellectually challenging subjects. It constantly develops the ways in which we live and think, as it plays a key role in most of today's scientific and technological advancements. [+]

BSc in Mathematics (Hons)Mathematics is one of the most fascinating and intellectually challenging subjects. It constantly develops the ways in which we live and think, as it plays a key role in most of today's scientific and technological advancements.This programme will give you a sound knowledge of mathematics and its application to real-life situations and will build up your ability to analyse and solve problems. It will provide you with an opportunity to acquire skills, such as logical analysis, deduction, mathematical modelling and calculation, which are valued by employers.

In response to our students' increased interest in pursuing a career in teaching, we also offer courses such as Mathematics in Society and Mathematics, Education and Communication. The latter offers teaching experience through the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme. This encourages and nurtures a new generation of mathematicians and provides the opportunity to gain classroom experience as a final-year option.... [-]


BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying

University of Greenwich
Campus Full time Part time 3 - 5 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This degree will give you the ideal basis for a career in the construction industry. As a quantity surveyor, you will provide a range of services, including cost and contract advice, cost forecasting, measurement and cost control. [+]

BScs in Measurement Science. This degree will give you the ideal basis for a career in the construction industry. As a quantity surveyor, you will provide a range of services, including cost and contract advice, cost forecasting, measurement and cost control. You will also be responsible for financial management of construction projects from inception to completion. This will give you an excellent basis for progression to management positions throughout the industry. Quantity surveying requires technical, economic, legal and managerial skills. The programme reflects this diversity. In Years 1 and 2, you will work closely on projects with fellow students from building surveying, design and construction management, and estate management programmes. The university is investing £76 million in a new building to house the campus library, TV studios and academic facilities for disciplines including architecture, design and construction. Stockwell Street is a short walk from the Greenwich Campus and this programme will be delivered there from 2014. The aims of the programme are: - To develop your knowledge of management, law and economics in the construction and property industries - To equip you with the skills, techniques and abilities needed to be a quantity surveyor - To develop your ability to solve construction problems. Attendance - 3 years full-time - 4 years sandwich - 5 years part-time Entry Requirements Applicants should have: 260 UCAS points PLUS at least three GCSEs at grade C or above (including English and mathematics) or equivalent qualifications. Assessment Students are assessed through examinations and coursework. Professional recognition This programme is a route to membership of the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). In order to achieve MRICS status it is necessary to undertake an accredited MSc after completing the above programme. Career options Graduates may pursue opportunities in private practice, with contractors, developers, housing associations and local and central government. [-]

BSc in Applied Mathematics

University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Bradford

Math is the universal language. If you are interested in learning more about this language, then our applied mathematics major may be a great choice for you. [+]

BSc in Applied Mathematics Description Program Contact: Dr. Marius Buliga Math is the universal language. If you are interested in learning more about this language, then our applied mathematics major may be a great choice for you. As an applied mathematics major, you'll use math to understand real-world problems like population growth and AIDS-related issues. You'll work on some interesting projects: Ranking sports teams. Looking into renewable energy alternatives. Investing. You may even get a chance to co-write a paper with one of your professors. And get it published in a math journal. Think how good that will look on a resume. And, there are many career options for math graduates. With the knowledge that you'll have, you'll be needed in many areas: Science and technology. Banking. Civil service. The computer industry. Or, you can go to graduate school to earn a master's or doctoral degree. What you can do with a degree in Applied Mathematics. Suggested 4-year plan of study. Courses Course Requirements in the Major CALCULUS I CALCULUS II CALCULUS III ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS LINEAR ALGEBRA MATHEMATICAL MODELING NUMERICAL ANALYSIS or ABSTRACT ALGEBRA AND NUMBER THEORY APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS ADVANCED DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS CAPSTONE: MATHEMATICS Upper-Level Mathematics Elective INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING COMPUTING INTRODUCTION TO SIMULATION or OPERATIONS RESEARCH Total Credits for Major: 47-48 Additional Information: *Not required for students seeking a degree in Mathematics Education or seeking secondary certification in Mathematics. Young Alums These are just some of the positions our recent graduates have. Jobs: Math Teacher at Port Allegany School District, Port Allegany, PA Product analyst at Mercury Insurance in Independence, Ohio [-]

B.S. in Actuarial Science

Siena College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Actuarial Science major at Siena College is a program combining rigorous mathematical study with Economics and Finance. Students who complete the program will have satisfied the Validation by Educational Experience requirements for the Casualty Actuary Society and the Society of Actuaries. [+]

BScs in Measurement Science. Actuarial Science is consistently rated as one of the best careers in America. This discipline is centered in assessing, pricing and ultimately managing institutional risk which is commonly used in the insurance industry and financial professions. Students who are good at mathematics that desire a professional component to their education are typically great candidates for this field. Actuarial Science is a discipline centered in assessing, pricing and ultimately managing institutional risk which is commonly used in the insurance industry and financial professions. Students who are good at mathematics that desire a professional component to their education are typically interested in this field commonly listed in the Top 10 professions. The Actuarial Science major at Siena College is a program combining rigorous mathematical study with Economics and Finance. Students who complete the program will have satisfied the Validation by Educational Experience requirements for the Casualty Actuary Society and the Society of Actuaries. The program features: Major coursework designed to prepare students for the first two professional exams. Elective coursework that will partially prepare students for the next three exams. A year-long professional seminar series featuring practicing actuaries demonstrating how principles int he curriculum are utilized in practice. Curriculum designed to prepare students for competitive national internships during the summers after your junior (or even sophomore) year. A dedicated faculty advisor that will help students prepare for exams, be prepared for professional interviews and focus elective study to maximize employability based on the strengths of the individual. Program Highlights Small classes. Emphasis on technical communication skills. Focus on long-range career success. Professional seminar series. Coursework designed to prepare students for the first two professional actuarial exams. Flexibility in choosing upper level electives. Dedicated faculty advisor to make sure students understand when to take exams, how to focus elective study and how to engage in an interview to maximize their employability. Requirements for the Major (35 cr.) CSIS110 - Intro to Computer Science 3 cr. This course is a broad introduction to a variety of fundamental topics in computer science through a contemporary theme such as robotics, the web, graphics, or gaming. Students will consider problems in the application area that can be solved with software. Using the theme of the course, students will be introduced to important areas of computer science including abstraction, computer organization, representation of information, history of computing, ethics, and the development and evaluation of algorithmic solutions using an appropriate programming environment. Themes may differ across sections. Lab fee. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ, CDQ, REC, STVN) Lecture Hours: 3 ECON430 - Econometrics 3 cr. An introduction to the application of statistical techniques to economic problems. This course includes a review of probability theory, mathematical expectation, and theoretical frequency distributions along with considerations of modeling economic phenomena. Ordinary and two-stage least squares regression techniques are utilized for hypothesis testing and economic forecasting. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC301 - Managerial Finance I 3 cr. An introduction to the principles of financial management. This course emphasizes an understanding of the role of finance within the firm. Topics covered include the elements of financial planning, valuation, cost of capital, and capital budgeting under conditions of certainty and risk. (ATTR: BUS, ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC315 - Adv Investments: Thry and Prac 3 cr. Through focusing on the development of the Markowitz Procedure, Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing and other theories, this course seeks to familiarize students with the theory underlying the practice of Finance. In addition, this course will also familiarize students with the inherent problems associated with these models as well as their strengths. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC421 - Bus Financial Forecasting 3 cr. This course explores the nature of fluctuations in aggregate business activity and the technique used to forecast. To gain an understanding of these techniques, and the usefulness of forecasts, students will prepare forecasts and explore their application to firm decision making. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. This course completes the calculus of elementary transcendental functions. It also includes techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, L’Hospital’s Rule, improper integrals, and introduction to sequences, infinite series and power series. Students apply concepts to work, volume, arc length, and other physical phenomena. Three hours of lecture and one hour and twenty minutes of laboratory each week. Lab fee. Students must purchase an approved graphing calculator prior to beginning this course. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ) Lecture Hours: 4 MATH210 - Calculus III 4 cr. This course completes the Calculus sequence. The topics covered are vectors in the plane and in a three dimensional space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, the chain rules, multiple integration including cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems and the theorems of Green and Stokes. Students apply these concepts to physical applications. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab each week. Lab fee. (ATTR: ARTS) Lecture Hours: 4 MATH371 - Probability for Statistics 3 cr. The course introduces mathematical probability to understand variation and variability. Methods of enumeration, con- ditional probability, independent events, and Bayes’ Theorem are developed in a general environment. Among the continuous and discrete probability distributions derived and studied are the Bernoulli distribution and distributions based on it, the uniform, exponential, normal, Gamma and Chi Square distributions. The Central Limit Theorem leads to approximations for discrete distributions. Chebyshev’s In- equality prepares the student for Inferential Statistics. (may be taken concurrently). Offered Spring semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH470 - Mathematical Statistics 3 cr. Statistical tests for multivariable problems are developed and applied to real data sets. The computer and the SPSS package will be used. Offered Fall Semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 Students must also complete one of the following pairs of courses: ACCT200 - Financial Accounting 3 cr. The first half of the introductory course in accounting emphasizes the role of accounting as an information and communication system necessary for economic decisions. The accounting process, systems and resulting classified financial statements are covered. Financial accounting concepts and practices relating to topics such as current and long term assets, inventories, current liabilites, equity and long term liabilities are included. (ATTR: BUS, ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 AND ACCT205 - Managerial Accounting 3 cr. The second introductory course in accounting focuses on the managerial aspect of accounting. The emphasis is placed on internal uses of accounting information to make managerial decisions. The coverage will include topics such as: cost volume profit analysis, cost behavior, activity based costing, short term decision making, in- come tax considerations, budgeting, responsibility accounting, performance measurement, and cost control. Lab problems required. (ATTR: BUS,ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 OR MATH230 - Linear Algebra 3 cr. This course studies elements of linear algebra with an emphasis on applications. Topics covered include matrices, systems of equations, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (ATTR: ARTS) Lecture Hours: 3 AND MATH320 - Mathematical Analysis 3 cr. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematical analysis. A two-term course that studies the real number systems, limits, sequences, series, convergence, uniform convergence, functions of one variable, continuity differ- entiability, Riemann integration, functions of several variables, line, surface, and volume integrals, Offered Spring Semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 Auxiliary Courses (10 cr.) ECON101 - Principles of Economics,Micro 3 cr. This course introduces students to fundamental economic concepts and theory, including demand, supply, and the formation of equilibrium prices in product and resource markets. In addition, the course offers an introduction to applied fields such as industrial organization (market structures), labor economics, unionism, international trade, and market failure. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS, CAS, ISP, CDS, STVS) Lecture Hours: 3 ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. This course examines the foundations of economic theory as it relates to unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Topics might include aggregate demand, aggregate supply, market equilibrium, national income accounting, theories of income determination, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policies. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS, CAS, ISP, CDS, STVS) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. Courses MATH- 110, 120, and 210 provide foundation for all upper level mathematics courses. Main topics considered during the first semester: functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, the chain-rule, antiderivatives, the definite integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and trigonometric functions. Applications of all topics are emphasized. Three hours of lecture and one hour and twenty minutes of laboratory per week. Lab fee. Students must purchase an approved graphing calculator prior to begining this course. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ, CDQ) Lecture Hours: 4 A minimum grade of B- is required in all courses in order to count towards the Actuarial Science major. Skills Developed Communicating technical information, verbally and in writing Constructing well-reasoned arguments Modeling and valuing complex financial instruments Organizing and working in teams Understanding time value of money calculations and constructing equations of value Working with real-world data Forecasting Financial behavior of a business Understanding the structure and pieces of a financial portfolio Applying technology to problem solving Employers of our Graduates Travelers The Hartford Chubb Insurance ISO Met Life Marsh Farm Family First Niagara Utica National Internship Sites New York State Insurance Department Swiss Re Munich Re Travelers The Hartford Met Life Farm Family Utica National [-]

Bachelor of Science in Equestrian Studies

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

All students who wish to ride are evaluated and classified as beginner, novice, intermediate, or advanced according to their demonstrated skills. Students are grouped with riders of comparable skills in small classes. Equitation is considered a physical education activity and, as such, earns one-half course credit. [+]

Wilson College offers two concentrations within the Equestrian Studies major: Equine Management and Equestrian Management. Equine Management Concentration The student interested primarily in the management of a barn will select the Equine Management concentration. This program directs the student's interests to the mechanics of running a stable and the handling of horses within a barn, including practical stable management. The Equine Management concentration requires two business-related courses. Equestrian Management Concentration The student primarily interested in riding and the teaching of riding will select the Equestrian Management concentration. The program improves skills in riding and provides an education focused on teaching. In addition to equestrian courses, both concentrations include courses in biology, psychology, physical education, and veterinary medical technology. The Equestrian Management concentration also requires an educational psychology course. All students who wish to ride are evaluated and classified as beginner, novice, intermediate, or advanced according to their demonstrated skills. Students are grouped with riders of comparable skills in small classes. Equitation is considered a physical education activity and, as such, earns one-half course credit. All students, regardless of major, may take as many equitation courses as their schedules can accommodate. The student in the Equestrian Management track may apply a maximum of three and one-half equitation course credits (seven semesters) toward graduation requirements. Other majors and students concentrating in equine management may apply not more than one and one-half course credits (three semesters) toward graduation requirements. Wilson College emphases a classical approach to balanced seat riding. Equestrian Studies Students are trained to be in self carriage with independent aids and seat such that they can influence the horse with maximum sensitivity and harmony with an emphasis on riding the horse correctly from back to front in all the disciplines. After mastery of the mechanics and schooling figures, riders are trained to influence and reshape their horses with patience and professionalism as they will in their careers. There is no emphasis on the short quick fix in any discipline. Riding Lessons Placement Testing All riders take a simple riding test during the summer or winter before the first riding class. Safety is the primary consideration in testing and placement of all riders. Class Levels Riding classes are divided into the following levels: Basic Level (I and II) Novice Level (I and II) Intermediate Level (I, II, III, IV, V, VI) Advanced Level (I, II, III, IV) Specialization Level (I, II, III, IV, V, VI) Specialization Classes The most advanced riders may choose one or more discipline-specific courses in riding: Dressage, Eventing, Hunters and Hunt Seat, Jumpers, and Schooling Green/Problem Horses. Scheduling Riding Classes Riding classes are scheduled as part of each student’s regular course load. Each course carries 0.5 credits, and meets twice a week for 75 minutes each class. Riders are placed in classes with others of the most similar level, ability, and discipline interest Lab Classes The Equestrian Center serves as the “hands-on classroom” for lab and practicum classes in Equestrian Studies and Equine Facilitated Therapeutics. Classes are scheduled to allow students to watch demonstrations, practice skills, and work alongside professionals in classes of all types and levels. Examples of Equestrian lab and practicum classes at Wilson College include: Applied Horse Training Techniques Training the Therapy Horse Teaching Horsemanship Student-Teacher Practicum Equine Health Management Labs Equine Facility Management Labs Equine Facilitated Therapeutics Teaching Practicum Management of Equine Events Practicum Equine Performance Management Labs Equestrian Management Course Requirements BIO 101: General Biology or BIO 110: Contemporary Biology EDU 207: Adolescent Development Cognition and Learning EQS 110: Introduction to Equine Management EQS 116: Equine Anatomy and Physiology EQS 220: Management of Equine Events EQS 230: Introduction to Training the Horse EQS 235: Applied Horse Training Techniques I EQS 240: Introduction to Teaching Horsemanship EQS 326, 327: Methods of Teaching and Training I, II EQS 328, 329: Principles and Practices of Equestrian Management I, II One additional major-related course at the 200 or 300 level, chosen in consultation with the student’s academic adviser. EQT XXX Six equitation courses, the levels of which are based on the rider’s skill ESS 145 First Aid and CPR/AED PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology Students must graduate with active first aid and CPR/AED certifications. Students who take ESS 145 as a first-year or sophomore student must repeat it during their junior or senior year in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Noncredit first aid and CPR/AED certifications will not be accepted as completion of the major requirement. Equine Management Course Requirements BUS 124: Introduction to Management One of the following six courses: ACC 105: Principles of Accounting I BUS 220, 320: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management BUS 223: Marketing Management BUS 225: Business Law ECO 101: Introduction to Macroeconomics ECO 102: Introduction to Microeconomics BIO 101: General Biology or Bio 110: Contemporary Biology And all of the following: EQS 110: Introduction to Equine Management EQS 116: Equine Anatomy and Physiology EQS 125: Equine Breeding Management EQS 220: Management of Equine Events EQS 225: Equine Health Management EQS 230: Introduction to Training the Horse EQS 240: Introduction to Teaching Horsemanship EQS 310: Equine Facility Management EQS 315: Equine Performance Management One additional major-related course at the 200 or 300 level, chosen in consultation with the student’s academic adviser. PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology ESS 145 First Aid and CPR/AED A Student must graduate with active first aid and CPR/AED certifications. Students who take ESS 145 as a first-year or sophomore student must repeat it during their junior or senior year in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Noncredit first aid and CPR/AED certifications will not be accepted as completion of the major requirement. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Biology

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The curriculum in biology provides thorough and intensive course work in both theoretical and applied aspects of biological science. Active participation by the students in laboratory and field courses is required and direct experience with living organisms and scientific instrumentation is a central focus of the program. [+]

BScs in Measurement Science. The curriculum in biology provides thorough and intensive course work in both theoretical and applied aspects of biological science. Active participation by the students in laboratory and field courses is required and direct experience with living organisms and scientific instrumentation is a central focus of the program. The science of biology is taught within the larger context of a liberal arts education and every effort is made to encourage interdisciplinary connections with the social sciences and the humanities. Courses strongly emphasize writing and speaking skills and avoid reducing science to the accumulation of factual knowledge. Majors are encouraged to pursue summer internships in field and laboratory settings. An undergraduate degree in biology offers a variety of career options, including technical positions in business and medicine. Many graduates earn advanced degrees in medical and veterinary schools or do graduate research in such fields as biochemistry and ecology. Students with expertise in genetics, physiology, and environmental science are increasingly in demand in business and government. Undergraduate work in the sciences provides the student with skills in research and the clarity of thought and communication essential for success in the contemporary world. Student Learning Goals To provide a broad foundation in the biological sciences. To engage students in the methods of scientific inquiry. To develop effective communication skills and foster independent thought and creativity. To promote critical analysis and scientific literacy within an ethical framework. To promote interdisciplinary study and the foundations of a liberal arts education. Events and Projects Marine Biology Field Trip When the marine biology course is offered in the fall, the students in the course participate in a field trip to Wallop's Island Marine Science Consortium located on the Chesapeake Bay. Students have the opportunity to visit a wide range of habitats including low and high energy beaches, mud flats, salt marshes, uninhabited dunes, maritime forests and inter tidal waters. We also spend time out on the water trawling for organisms that are found in the coastal waters that line the bay. An evening trip to catch bio-luminescent ctenophores is always a highlight. Invasive Species Removal on the Interpretive Trail Wilson College is fortunate to have an interpretive trail on campus that includes a natural wetland, grassland area and forest. However, like most natural areas today, the trail is plagued with invasive plant species. During the fall of 2005, the Conservation Biology course decided to tackle the issue of invasive species and decide how best to return the trail to its natural state. The students chose three plots where invasives would be removed as well as two control plots. One control plot was relatively free of invasives and one plot had a very large percentage of invasives. During the course of the semester, the students identified all the plants in the plot and physically removed all invasive species. The goal is to have students from other classes continue the project and determine if the invasive removal was successful. General Biology Course at Caledonia Each spring, the students enrolled in the General Biology course take a trip to Caledonia State Park to conduct some field research. They collect samples from the stream, identify plant life along the trails and attempt to find some interesting fungi. Physical and Life Sciences Symposium At the end of the fall semester each year, the senior biology and chemistry majors present their research projects at the Physical and Life Sciences Symposium. This research was proposed by the student in the spring of their junior year and the research was conducted during the summer and fall. Each student chooses their own topic and conducts the research independently under the nominal guidance of a faculty member. Some of the abstracts from recent projects can be found on the student research page. Pennsylvania Academy of Sciences The Pennsylvania Academy of Sciences holds their annual meeting each spring and many of the Wilson seniors present their research at this scientific meeting. This meeting is attended by faculty and students from across the state and provides an opportunity to share current data and research ideas. Some of the presentations from recent years are listed below. Course Requirements BIO 101: General Biology I BIO 102: General Biology II CHM 101: General Chemistry I CHM 102: General Chemistry II or CHM 103: Fundamentals of General Chemistry CHM 201: Organic Chemistry I CHM 202: Organic Chemistry II or CHM 104: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry MAT 130: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I MAT 140: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II BIO 398: Design and Methods of Scientific Research BIO 400: Senior Research Seminar I BIO 402: Senior Research Seminar II or EDU 433: Student Teaching - Secondary Six course credits at the 200 or 300 level, of which at least two will be at the 300 level, EXCEPT Bio 215 - Anatomy and Physiology I and 216 - Anatomy and Physiology II. The student may choose a special emphasis by selecting courses from one of the following groups: General BIO 208: Genetics BIO 210: Introductory Botany BIO 211: Microbiology BIO 270, 370: Topics in Biology BIO 302: Developmental Biology BIO 306: Immunology BIO 310: Molecular Cell Biology I BIO 317: Basic Techniques of Electron Microscopy Biochemistry and Physiology BIO 205: Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates BIO 207: Vertebrate Physiology BIO 209: Nutrition BIO 304: Histology BIO 312: Molecular and Cell Biology II CHM 310: Biochemistry Ecology and Evolutionary Biology BIO 206: Invertebrate Zoology BIO 230: Conservation Biology BIO 309: Evolution BIO 314: Ecology [-]