BScs in Canada

See 38 Top BSc Degrees in Canada 2017

BSc

A Bachelor of Science or BSc is an undergraduate study program that usually lasts between three and five years.  While enrolled in school, students have the opportunity to take general and specialized classes to obtain credit for graduation.

A BSc stands for Bachelor of Science, and it is an undergraduate degree. It may be pursued by students who are pursuing a career in science or technology, and it usually takes three to five years to complete.

Canadians place great importance on learning, and have developed a first-rate education system with high standards. Not only does Canada provide a safe, clean environment, but it has been consistently ranked as one of the world’s best places to live in terms of quality of life by the UN.

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BSc (Honours) Computer Science

Bishop's University
Campus Full time 3 years September 2017 Canada Sherbrooke

We offer a solid Computer Science education in a Liberal Arts environment. We also integrate into our curriculum real-world experience including our co-operative education program and access to Undergraduate Capstone Open Source Projects. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. We offer a solid Computer Science education in a Liberal Arts environment. We also integrate into our curriculum real-world experience including our co-operative education program and access to Undergraduate Capstone Open Source Projects. We are active in several research areas and we offer a research intensive Master’s programme as well as opportunities for undergraduate students to get involved in cutting-edge research. Solid Computer Science Education We offer a solid and complete Computer Science education (Honours, Major, Minor). In addition, we offer interdisciplinary programmes (such as BAIT), and a number of certificates. Research We are active in a number of research areas, including theoretical computer science, formal software engineering, and image processing. Our MSc programme is research intensive. We offer good opportunities for undergraduate students to be involved in cutting-edge research under USRA scholarships or similar. Several faculty are collaborating with fellow faculty from Université de Sherbrooke. For our Francophones students — Pour nos étudiants francophones A growing number of francophone students come to study Computer Science at Bishop’s. Computer Science is a language that everyone understands and speaks! We all speak Java and C++ and do the same Math. Many of our faculty are bilingual, and by the end of their degree, all Francophone students are bilingual as well! For our International prospective students Over the years, we have had a large number of international students with limited command of the English language, who have been very successful in their studies, and have graduated with the highest awards and prizes on campus. Those who need help with their English can register in many ESL (English as a Second Language) courses while they take their Computer Science courses. Did you know? New! Our students have access to UCOSP projects thus obtaining real experience by building a substantial software system as part of a team distributed all over Canada. Our co-op education program combines a student’s academic program with integrated work experiences through full-time work terms and regular academic sessions. The work terms are designed to present the students with the opportunity to blend theory and practice and to gain work experience. We offer a research-intensive MSc program Many of our 100-level courses are for the general population – no prerequisites We are operating in a Liberal Arts environment: It is easy to combine other Majors (particularly Math and Physics) and Minors with your CS degree. Courses & Programs Undergraduate Degree Programs Our department offers a sound and complete education in Computer Science, supplemented by opportunities to join the research groups of our faculty. Numerous students have gone forward to graduate studies or to good jobs. We also offer a friendly atmosphere, with opportunities to socialize with faculty and fellow students. All the faculty maintain an open-door policy in both academic and non-academic matters, and we encourage students’ participation in the Computer Science Club. Our offering includes a complete set of undergraduate programs in Computer Science: Honours in Computer Science Major in Computer Science Bachelor of Arts in Information Technology (BAIT) – in cooperation with the Williams School of Business Minor in Computer Science The Department also offers a Certificate in Computer Science. Admission process Create a GoBishops account Once logged in, click on “Apply” to access the online application form. Complete the application form and submit it electronically. An application of $75 CAD for students studying within Canada or an application fee of $100 CAD for students studying outside Canada (payable by credit card) is required at the time of online application for all degree/certificate programs. Students applying for an exchange program from approved partner institutions do not pay an application fee. Submit all required supporting documents to the Admissions Office. Bishop’s University – Admissions Office 2600 rue College Sherbrooke, QC J1M 1Z7 Canada E-mail: admissions@ubishops.ca* Track the status of your application through your GoBishops account. Admissions files are assessed on a rolling basis, as soon as all required documents are received. Exceptions: Applications to the School of Education are reviewed in partnership with the School of Education and most offers for our education programs will not be made until January or February of each year. Applications for our Music programs also need to be evaluated based on their audition. Decisions for this program will not be made until both elements are reviewed. [-]

BSc Neuroscience

Bishop's University
Campus Full time 3 years September 2017 Canada Sherbrooke

Psychology is the science of how we think, feel and behave. It is a field with both broad purpose in enhancing our knowledge of human behaviour, as well as having important applications for the local and wider community. [+]

Psychology is the science of how we think, feel and behave. It is a field with both broad purpose in enhancing our knowledge of human behaviour, as well as having important applications for the local and wider community. Studying Psychology at Bishop’s is being part of a warm, tightly-knit community with many benefits. Some of the things you can expect at Bishop’s: You are not a number As class sizes are relatively small, our students are able to work closely with our friendly, approachable professors. It is a comforting feeling to be known by your name and not your student number when approaching them. We are particularly proud of the quality of our teaching, with six of our faculty members having been recognized with teaching awards. Above all else though we are available for our students and go the extra mile to make sure they get the most out of the Bishop’s experience, and beyond; every year a number of our graduating students go on to Masters and Ph.D. programs across the country and around the world. Research opportunities in important current areas How do our thoughts and feelings affect our experience of pain? Why is music so important to so many people and how does it affect our emotions and actions? Is procrastination bad for your health? Why do some people thrive while living with a chronic illness while others just survive? How does time perspective influence health and well-being? What do we know about the brain that would help us to better understand behavior and the behavior of more at-risk populations? How can we better trace the debilitative effects of concussions? How can we stem the tide of stigmatization towards those faced with mental illness? Why does society marginalize others according to their sexual, ethnic or religious identity? How does being part of a linguistic minority group impact perceived access to healthcare? These are just a few of the important questions in Psychology that faculty members are investigating in their research. In particular, our Department is at the core of the Psychological Health and Well-being research cluster; a theme that has recently been identified as one of the four research priorities of the University. The Psychological Health and Well-being research cluster is a multidisciplinary research group comprised of members from the fields of Social Sciences, Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Business. Their overall objective is to produce and share knowledge regarding how to enhance the psychological health and well-being of individuals and the communities that they live in. New and interesting courses Our size means that not only are we able to offer opportunities in more personalized areas of interest such as in our Practicum course, where advanced students can gain applied experience outside the classroom, but that we can have an evolving program where our professors can bring their expertise from their research into the classroom. Recent additions to the Psychology program include: PSY 298 Zen and the Brain (Dr. Mendrek); This course explores Eastern philosophy, such as meditation and mindfulness, from a neuropsychological perspective. PSY 333a Psychology of Exceptional Development (Dr. Lawford); This experiential learning course is a survey of various kinds of exceptionality in children, including intellectual disabilities, giftedness, and speech and language differences. PSY 442b Practicum (Dr. Charpentier); This course is completely practical and offers experiential learning opportunities. Students spend 6hrs/week under close supervision in one of a number of applied settings. Field placements are possible in hospital and school settings, as well as various community organizations. Life outside the classroom Being part of Bishop’s is to have opportunities to develop fully; to have confidence when communicating your knowledge of your subject and your own ideas, to have a broad range of skills and interests, and to approach life with an open outlook. Throughout the program, we maintain a firm commitment to the core competencies of Psychology; critical thinking and analysis, experimental design and data analysis, and knowledge of both historical theory and current research. Our students also enjoy many extra-curricular activities such as the twice-yearly wine and cheese run by the Undergraduate Psychology Society where faculty members and students get together in a beautiful mansion house in Lennoxville. Where can this lead me? Psychology is a broad field that can lead to a wide array of exciting careers. Our Recent Graduates generally follow one of these three career paths: About a third (often our Honours or Neuroscience graduates) go into graduate studies in various fields of Psychology (e.g. Clinical, Social, Cognitive, Abnormal) or in Neuroscience, Psychoeducation, Orthophony and Audiology, Pharmacology, Education, Optometry, Social Work, Business, Law or Medicine. About a third (often our Applied Psychology graduates) are employed in psychology, health and education related fields and work in schools, community organizations, non-profit organization, CLSCs or hospitals, international aid, prisons, youth services, university or private laboratories etc. About a third either work in the public sector (e.g. government, municipal services etc.) or move towards business, either as entrepreneurs (e.g. education, health, online services, entertainment, retail, etc.) or as employees (e.g. human resources, sales and representation, management, etc.). Courses & Programs We offer a wide array of courses in all areas of Psychology including: personality, physiological psychology, cognition, motivation, child and adult development, social psychology and psychopathology. Additional requirements include the history of psychology, psychological statistics and the methodology of experimental psychology. Students interested in applied psychology may also take courses in clinical and health psychology, in addition to a practicum course that allows for supervised work experience outside the classroom. Newly renovated experimental facilities allow advanced students to perform their own research under the direct, individual supervision of a faculty member. Several professors in the Psychology department have received awards for teaching excellence. Programs Students are initially admitted into a Major program. Excellent students may then be admitted into Honours if they maintain a cumulative average over 75% and good standing (70%) in methodology and stats courses. The Honours program provides the opportunity for the students to conduct their own research under the direct, individual supervision of a faculty member. This is recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school. Québec students entering one of the Psychology programs with a DEC and appropriate background can usually complete either the Major or Honours program in three years. Students entering from Grade 12 will normally require four years. Major or Honours in Neuroscience (B.Sc.) This program focuses on the physiological aspects of Psychology: the workings of the human brain and its relationship to human behavior. It includes a number of physiological psychology, biology and biochemistry courses. The strong science component makes this program an excellent preparation towards graduate school or medicine. Major or Honours in Psychology - Neuroscience Concentration (B.Sc.; 54 and 72 credits) This program focuses on the physiological aspects of Psychology and the brain-behavior relationship. To complete the neuroscience program within three years, Quebec students should enter with a collegial diploma in science (D.E.C.), that includes Mathematics 201-NYA-05, 201-NYB-05, Physics 203-NYA-05, 203-NYB-05, Chemistry 202-NYA-05, 202-NYB-05, and Biology 101-NYA- 05. Students entering from other CEGEP programs or from Grade 12 will be required to complete science prerequisites prior to un- dertaking the neuroscience major and will usually complete the degree in four years. The major includes 39 credits of core courses and 15 credits of Psychology and Science options for a total of 54 credits. The Honours adds an additional 18 credits for a total of 72 credits. Admission into Psychology Programs Students applying on the basis of a completed DEC will be ad- mitted into a three-year program. Students from outside Quebec applying on the basis of an Ontario OSSD or a Grade 12 or equiv- alent will be accepted into a four-year program. Students may normally transfer into a Major or Honours Psy- chology program from another Bishop’s program, provided they have a minimum cumulative average of 65% on at least 24 course credits completed at Bishop’s, or provided they have demonstrat- ed an aptitude for the program by achieving an average of 65% in all program courses attempted (minimum of 12 credits). Prerequisites Note that all prerequisites can be completed at Bishop’s. All our programs include two Introduction to Psychology prereq- uisites (PSY 101 and PSY 102). Our Majors/Honours programs also include an Introductory Biology (BIO 191/BIL 191 or BIO 194) prerequisite. These courses must be completed within the rst three semesters of study. These prerequisites will be waived for students who have completed CEGEP courses in Psychology (Introductory Psychology and two other Psychology courses) and Human Biology. Our psychology – neuroscience program in- cludes additional science prerequisites; these will be waived for CEGEP science students. Admission process Create a GoBishops account Once logged in, click on “Apply” to access the online application form. Complete the application form and submit it electronically. An application of $75 CAD for students studying within Canada or an application fee of $100 CAD for students studying outside Canada (payable by credit card) is required at the time of online application for all degree/certificate programs. Students applying for an exchange program from approved partner institutions do not pay an application fee. Submit all required supporting documents to the Admissions Office. Bishop’s University – Admissions Office 2600 rue College Sherbrooke, QC J1M 1Z7 Canada E-mail: admissions@ubishops.ca* Track the status of your application through your GoBishops account. Admissions files are assessed on a rolling basis, as soon as all required documents are received. Exceptions: Applications to the School of Education are reviewed in partnership with the School of Education and most offers for our education programs will not be made until January or February of each year. Applications for our Music programs also need to be evaluated based on their audition. Decisions for this program will not be made until both elements are reviewed. [-]

Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in Environmental Systems Engineering

University of Regina
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 Canada Regina

Our Environmental Systems Engineering (EVSE) program is very popular with students and respected by industry, largely because of its timely combination of environmental concerns and the systems approach to addressing civil and industrial environmental issues. Areas of study include environmental system design and impact and risk assessment. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in Environmental Systems Engineering What is Environmental Systems Engineering? Our Environmental Systems Engineering (EVSE) program is very popular with students and respected by industry, largely because of its timely combination of environmental concerns and the systems approach to addressing civil and industrial environmental issues. Areas of study include environmental system design and impact and risk assessment. Our Program The Environmental Systems Engineering (EVSE) program demonstrates and applies systems engineering principles to environmental issues associated with water resources, air pollution, transportation, industrial development, and waste management. Graduate with: Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in Environmental Systems Engineering Students in Co-operative Education graduate with a B.A.Sc. (Co-op) in Environmental Systems Engineering Students in the Internship Program graduate with a B.A.Sc. (Internship) in Environmental Systems Engineering The EVSE program is fully accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. Undergraduate EVSE Labs Our students apply learnings from classroom lectures in the laboratory sections of each course to witness theory in practice, to gain hands-on laboratory experience, to practice necessary applied skills, and to practice engineering design. In the Fluids Dynamics and Hydraulics Laboratory, students learn principles of fluids. The Applied Biosystems Laboratory teaches biological applications in environmental engineering. The Water and Wastewater Laboratory is used in the design and optimization of water and wastewater treatment systems. Our Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory houses geotechnical testing and surveying equipment. Students test, characterize, and classify soils and examine soil properties. Over the past five years the number of international students studying at the University of Regina has grown by 77%, helping make our campus more diverse than at any time in our history. Students from more than 66 countries now call our University home, enriching the student experience by bringing global perspectives to our campus community. At the same time, more than 800 domestic students have taken advantage of study abroad opportunities to broaden their education in other countries and further develop into “citizens of the world.” All of these students attend the University of Regina because of the quality of our academic programs, and they come here knowing that a comprehensive program of support is available to them through our UR International office. UR International is deeply committed to student success offering academic, social, life skills, and language services that help provide students with the tools they need to make the most of their University of Regina education. High ranking: One of Canada’s top 10 comprehensive universities. Support is our strength: From the moment we meet you and your family, until the moment you find employment after graduation, we provide personalized services to encourage and assist in your academic and career needs. State of the art facilities: Come and discover our new campus. It is modern, clean and convenient. The U of R is a global community: We are large enough to host students from over 90 countries, yet small enough to give you a more personalized and focused academic experience. You can get to know your professors and faculty members. The student to faculty ratio is 20:1.We Also have many associations that you can get involved with. Check it out! Success for life: Regina is your home away from home! It is safe, affordable and provides a high standard of living. Saskatchewan has an immigration nomination program that is faster than national program and is open to University of Regina graduates. [-]

Bachelor of Science Chemistry & Biochemistry

University of Regina
Campus Full time Part time January 2017 Canada Regina

Nature and behaviour of elements, compounds and chemical reactions; analytical, computational, inorganic, organic, physical and theoretical chemistry; metabolism, nutritional and regulatory chemistry, enzymes, nucleic acids, biophysics and molecular genetics (biochemistry); synthesis of new compounds or materials; detection and measurement of chemicals; quality control; environmental protection; health and safety practices; scientific research methodology and data analysis. [+]

Bachelor of Science Chemistry & Biochemistry Knowledge Nature and behaviour of elements, compounds and chemical reactions; analytical, computational, inorganic, organic, physical and theoretical chemistry; metabolism, nutritional and regulatory chemistry, enzymes, nucleic acids, biophysics and molecular genetics (biochemistry); synthesis of new compounds or materials; detection and measurement of chemicals; quality control; environmental protection; health and safety practices; scientific research methodology and data analysis. Skills Plan, set up and conduct chemical analyses (e.g., soil, hormones, water); design, synthesize and test new chemical products (e.g., drugs, foods, fuels, paints, new materials, nanochemicals); measure pollutants in the air, water and soil; examine evidence and DNA; assess and solve complex problems; think logically, creatively and independently; interpret and write detailed technical reports; observe health and safety practices; apply computer skills and statistical techniques. Sample Courses Biochemistry Metabolism, Enzymes, Biophysics, Molecular Genetics, Chemical Biology, Advanced Microscopy, Cell Signalling. Sample Courses Chemistry Organic Chemistry, Quantum Chemistry, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals, Modern Organic Synthesis, Computational Chemistry. Examples of Career Fields and Occupations Analytical Chemist Biochemist (e.g., manufacturing & pharmaceutical industries) Biotechnology Chemical Technologist Clinical Chemist Environmental Chemist Food Scientist Forensics Gene Technologist Laboratory Analyst Health/Safety Inspector Health Professional (e.g., dentist, nutritionist, pharmacist, physician) Immunologist Industrial Chemist (e.g., agriculture, cosmetics, forestry, petroleum, plastics) Medical Lab Technologist Pharmaceutical Chemist Pathology Assistant Pharmacologist Plant Physiologist Pollution Control Professor Research Assistant Research Chemist Sales Manager Science Writer Teacher Toxicologist Over the past five years, for example, the number of international students studying at the University of Regina has grown by 77%, helping make our campus more diverse than at any time in our history. Students from more than 66 countries now call our University home, enriching the student experience by bringing global perspectives to our campus community. At the same time, more than 800 domestic students have taken advantage of study abroad opportunities to broaden their education in other countries and further develop into “citizens of the world.” All of these students attend the University of Regina because of the quality of our academic programs, and they come here knowing that a comprehensive program of support is available to them through our UR International office. UR International is deeply committed to student success offering academic, social, life skills, and language services that help provide students with the tools they need to make the most of their University of Regina education. High ranking: One of Canada’s top 10 comprehensive universities. Support is our strength: From the moment we meet you and your family, until the moment you find employment after graduation, we provide personalized services to encourage and assist in your academic and career needs. State of the art facilities: Come and discover our new campus. It is modern, clean and convenient. The U of R is a global community: We are large enough to host students from over 90 countries, yet small enough to give you a more personalized and focused academic experience. You can get to know your professors and faculty members. The student to faculty ratio is 20:1.We Also have many associations that you can get involved with. Check it out! Success for life: Regina is your home away from home! It is safe, affordable and provides a high standard of living. Saskatchewan has an immigration nomination program that is faster than national program and is open to University of Regina graduates. [-]

Bachelor of Science, Geoscience

University of Calgary
Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Calgary

Our field courses are the most exciting and intensive learning activities offered by the Department of Geoscience. They are unique experiences that provide students with the opportunity to do real Geoscience, work with real scientific data, and learn about natural environments. Teamwork is strongly encouraged, so you can expect to forge bonds with your fellow students that will last throughout your... [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. Our field courses are the most exciting and intensive learning activities offered by the Department of Geoscience. They are unique experiences that provide students with the opportunity to do real Geoscience, work with real scientific data, and learn about natural environments. Teamwork is strongly encouraged, so you can expect to forge bonds with your fellow students that will last throughout your entire university experience and beyond. The geology field courses provide opportunities to study rocks and geologic structures where they are best exposed and most easily interpreted. Field exercises include orienteering, mapping surficial deposits, measuring sections in sedimentary rocks, and mapping geologic structures in sedimentary and/or igneous & metamorphic rocks. The hydrogeology and geophysics field courses provide opportunities to collect field data using geotechnical and geophysical equipment, then analyze and interpret the data using mathematical and computational methods. Each field course runs for 12 – 16 days off-campus, in either the late summer before classes begin (August – September) or early spring after classes end (April – May). Most field sites are located beside or near roads, but some are only accessible by hiking in, often through very rugged terrain. You must be in reasonable physical condition, fully mobile, confident on slopes and in high places, and mentally prepared for working long days outdoors in a variety of environmental conditions, including hot sun, rain or snow, in places like the Canadian Shield, Alberta prairies, Rocky Mountains and deserts of southwest USA. The Department of Geoscience offers the following field courses: Course Title GLGY 337 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods GLGY 435 Field Methods II GLGY 441/639 Field Techniques in Hydrogeology GLGY 537 Field Methods III GOPH 549 Geophysics Field School [-]

Bachelor of Science in Psychology

University of Prince Edward Island
Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Charlottetown

We encourage our students to fully engage in the process of liberal education. We encourage work across a broad range of elective courses in the arts and sciences, so that psychology study is enriched by a diverse context of academic disciplines and ways of experiencing, enquiring into, and making sense of our world. [+]

We encourage our students to fully engage in the process of liberal education. We encourage work across a broad range of elective courses in the arts and sciences, so that psychology study is enriched by a diverse context of academic disciplines and ways of experiencing, enquiring into, and making sense of our world. Our students build skills in critical and creative thinking, effective reading, writing, and oral communication, research, and independent and collaborative problem solving. In addition to teaching students in a wide range of psychology courses, members of our faculty have exciting programmes of research, often engaging both UPEI students and colleagues from across Canada and the world. Our faculty members include award winning teachers and scholars, and people committed to service in the university and the broader community. Dr. Jason Doiron, PhD - Chair Department of Psychology Course Requirements Eighteen (18) semester courses (54 semester hours) in Psychology which must include Psychology 101-102, Psychology 278-279, Psychology 480 (Honours Literature Review) and Psychology 490 (Honours Thesis). Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BA with a major in Psychology. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with Honours in Psychology must complete all of the requirements for a BSc with a major in Psychology. To graduate with an Honours degree requires a total of 42 semester courses (126 semester hours). The Honours Thesis The Honours Thesis will consist of a paper written in the format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association. The thesis will most typically report a small research project, but other alternatives include: (a) a review paper that includes an original theoretical overview of the topic, or (b) a critique of the theory, research, or practice of psychology. The thesis is evaluated by a committee of at least three faculty members including the student’s supervisor. There is an oral defence of the thesis. The deadlines for Honours applications are September 1, January 3, and May 1 annually. Admission Requirements A student must be a Psychology major. A student must have an overall average of at least 70% in all prior courses. To remain in the program, a student must maintain an overall average of 70% in all courses and an average of 75% in Psychology courses. A student must formally apply to the Department of Psychology for admission. The first step is to contact the Honours Co-ordinator or another member of the Psychology faculty who will advise the student of the steps in the application process. This initial contact will normally occur during the first half of the Third Year. Students will be required to fill out an application form, and to provide an updated transcript. Students will be expected to have selected an area of study, and to provide a preliminary proposal for an Honours Thesis before proceeding with the formal application process. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources, not all applicants who meet the formal requirements will be accepted. The completed Honours application should be submitted to the prospective Honours Thesis supervisor, who will then submit it to the Department for review. OTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE HONOURS PROGRAM Because of the extra course requirements and the extra time consumed by the process of producing an Honours Thesis, early planning is important. Students may be required to pay part or all of the expenses to produce the Honours Thesis. The Department of Psychology intends to provide some financial support for students, but the amount will depend on (a) the funding the Department receives, and (b) the number of students in the program. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics

University of Prince Edward Island
Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Charlottetown

The School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences at UPEI provides students with a strong foundation in Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, and offers a comprehensive suite of applied programs which meet market demand and lead to fulfilling careers in areas such as: Financial Mathematics, Actuarial Science, Data Analytics, Business Analytics and Video Game Programming. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. The School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences at UPEI provides students with a strong foundation in Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, and offers a comprehensive suite of applied programs which meet market demand and lead to fulfilling careers in areas such as: Financial Mathematics, Actuarial Science, Data Analytics, Business Analytics and Video Game Programming. Faculty members in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences are focused on providing quality instruction in a friendly learning community. Small class sizes, active-learning opportunities and accessible professors are features of all programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences. Financial Mathematics Financial Mathematics is the application of mathematical models to finance, usually to analyze markets and pricing. Financial Mathematics uses techniques from Mathematics, Statistics, Business and Economics. The Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics provides a solid foundation in Financial Mathematics, leading either to a career in the financial sector or to further training in advanced Financial Mathematics. Requirements Course code prefixes In the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, there are five course prefixes: MATH – for Mathematics courses STAT – for Statistics courses CS – for Computer Science courses AMS – for Applied Mathematical Sciences courses (mainly Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics) MCS – for common or interdisciplinary courses in Mathematical and Computational Science Common requirements across all degree programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences COMMON CORE All degree programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences are built on a common core of courses that should be completed in the first two years of study. This common core consists of the following courses: Course Course name Credits MATH 191 Single Variable Calculus I 4 MATH 192 Single Variable Calculus II 4 MATH 261 Linear Algebra I 3 STAT 221 Introductory Statistics 3 CS 151 Introduction to Computer Science I 3 CS 152 Introduction to Computer Science II 3 One of: UPEI 101: Writing Studies UPEI 102: Inquiry Studies UPEI 103: University Studies Total Semester Hours of Credit 23 COMMON BREADTH REQUIREMENT Students must take at least 15 semester hours of credit in courses outside the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences (excluding one of the UPEI courses listed above), and of these 15 semester hours of credit, at least 6 must be from Biology, Chemistry or Physics and at least 6 must be from outside the Faculty of Science. COMMON ADVANCED COURSES Students in all degree programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences must complete MCS 421 Professional Communication and Practice (writing-intensive) and MCS 305 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences. Careers: Mathematician Video Game Designer Statistician Actuary Web Developer Financial Manager ... and many more! [-]

Bachelor of Art in Women's Studies & Gender Studies

St. Thomas University
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Fredericton

Students explore the idea that identity is constructed through interplay of individuals and social groups and institutions— the family, peers, cultural and religious groups, the media, etc. Courses enable students to learn about the dynamic nature of gender roles and norms, sexism, and power relations. [+]

Students explore the idea that identity is constructed through interplay of individuals and social groups and institutions— the family, peers, cultural and religious groups, the media, etc. Courses enable students to learn about the dynamic nature of gender roles and norms, sexism, and power relations. A range of gender equity issues are now recognized as public policy issues, including gender-based violence, bullying, and workplace equity. Whether the focus is social justice, gender studies, or world cultures, the core issues include the social construction of identity, the nature and impact of power relations and diversity, and the role of personal engagement and social action. CRITICAL & TRANSFERABLE SKILLS Our students benefit from the analytical and communication skills developed in the women’s rights and men’s movements for social change. Analytical and communication skills apply to work environments where social policy is addressed and social science or humanities research skills are required, such as in social work, law, government research, e.g., Statistics Canada, and especially in educational counselling, and teaching. With the need for greater awareness around sexual harassment/abuse in workplaces and schools, including cyber-intimidation, the critical self-examination this field engenders is a central skill that managers and administrators are required to develop. COMMON CAREERS AND GRADUATE PATHWAYS Graduates from this program are prepared for professional jobs in education, social work, law, and management pertaining to an individual’s right to live, work, and study in an environment free of intimidation, discrimination, or harm. Post-secondary education and research is also a popular path for graduates. Even software companies hire graduates with these backgrounds to prepare modules in education, management, and government that reflect current issues and research. RELATED AREAS OF STUDY Many courses within the Women’s Studies and Gender Studies program are concentrated in Sociology and Psychology, but Economics, Gerontology, Science and Technology Studies, and Criminology courses focus on women’s and gender related themes, as well. Major in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies A Major in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies consists of 36 credit hours of course work beyond the 1000 level. These consist mostly of the cross-listed courses below. Honours in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies An Honours in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies consists of 48 credit hours of courses beyond the 1000 level, of which 6 credit hours must be in theory or methods. In addition, an Honours thesis valued at 6 credit hours is required. These courses should include an Honours thesis seminar or workshop of 3 or 6 credit hours, depending on the discipline offering the course. Minor in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies A Minor in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies requires completion of 18 credit hours in cross-listed courses, in two different fields. Introduction to Women’s Studies and Gender Studies (GEND 2016) is recommended. Although students must devise their own plans, the University has designated the following courses as appropriate for Women’s Studies and Gender Studies. The notation (GEND) appears after the titles of these courses as they appear in the description of courses for respective departments. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Political Science

St. Thomas University
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Fredericton

Our Political Science program covers the four traditional subfields of the discipline: Canadian Politics and Government, Comparative Politics, International Relations and World Politics, and Political Philosophy. Students are offered a sound foundation in the institutional and philosophical dimensions of political life and are attuned to the trends and shocks that alter the forces and issues affecting us at home and abroad. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. Our Political Science program covers the four traditional subfields of the discipline: Canadian Politics and Government, Comparative Politics, International Relations and World Politics, and Political Philosophy. Students are offered a sound foundation in the institutional and philosophical dimensions of political life and are attuned to the trends and shocks that alter the forces and issues affecting us at home and abroad. The program also offers a for-credit Model United Nations course, which sends student each year to at least one major Model UN simulation. Teams have competed at Harvard, the UN in New York, and Ottawa. Each spring, St. Thomas hosts the John Peters Humphrey Model UN for high school students, giving students in our Political Science Department a chance to become centrally involved in organizing and running the event. CRITICAL & TRANSFERABLE SKILLS Political Science students hone their reading, writing, and analytic skills. They examine arguments, identify trends, test theories, and explain developments. They learn about the links between individual concerns and public policy problems. By studying case studies in national and international governance, international relations, and comparative politics, they develop their skills of public policy analysis and prepare themselves for analytical, project management, and communication work in various agencies of the government, as well as non-governmental and international organizations. COMMON CAREERS AND GRADUATE PATHWAYS Many Political Science graduates pursue careers in law, journalism, public service, domestic and international organizations, research, communications and public relations, education, domestic and international nongovernmental organizations, business, academia, and many other areas of the public and private sectors. A degree in Political Science prepares students to understand and thrive in the social and political aspects that inevitably affect almost every field of work. RELATED AREAS OF STUDY The study of politics and government incorporate such diverse and sometimes conflicting perspectives. It is important for students of Political Science to be familiar with an array of topics that are deeply understood by taking courses in other subject areas such as History, Philosophy, Great Books, Economics, English, and Sociology. Consideration of historical, philosophical, economic, and social aspects of government is essential to understanding today’s political institutions and processes. Major in Political Science Students majoring in Political Science are required to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours in Political Science, including 3 credit hours at the introductory level and 6 credit hours in each of the four fields of Political Science offered at St. Thomas. For Canadian Government and Politics, the 6-credit requirement is satisfied by completing POLS 2103 and one other Canadian politics course at the 2000 or 3000 level. For Comparative Government and Politics, the 6-credit requirement is satisfied by completing POLS 2303 and 2313. For International Relations and Foreign Policy, the 6-credit requirement is satisfied by completing one or more of POLS 2613, 2623, 3313, 3513, 3523, 3533, and/or 4603. For Political Philosophy, the 6-credit requirement is satisfied by completing POLS 2803 and 2813. Minor in Political Science The Minor in Political Science requires 3 credit hours at the introductory level and 15 additional credit hours from at least two different fields of Political Science. Honours in Political Science An Honours BA in Political Science consists of 54 credit hours in Political Science including: 3 credit hours at the introductory level POLS 2103 Canadian Constitutional Politics and one other Canadian politics course at the 2000 or 3000 level POLS 2303 Comparative Politics of the Developed World POLS 2313 Comparative Politics of the Developing Areas POLS 2613 International Relations I POLS 2623 International Relations II POLS 2803 The Western Tradition of Political Philosophy I POLS 2813 The Western Tradition of Political Philosophy II POLS 2913 Quantitative Methods in Social Science POLS 3913 Honours Thesis Proposal POLS 4903 Capstone Seminar – Problems in Political Inquiry POLS 4923 Honours Thesis The list of courses above totals 39 credit hours and of the remaining 15 credits required for Honours: students must take 3 credit hours at the 4000 level; and for the other 12 credit hours, two courses must be at the 3000 or 4000 levels Candidates will be expected to maintain a grade point average of 3.0 in the Honours subject. In calculating the grade point average for Honours, all courses in the Honours subject will be counted. Students must achieve at least a B in each of Political Science 3913 and 4923. Students who wish to take the Honours BA in Political Science are strongly encouraged to consult with the Chair of the Department before the end of their second year. Students are expected to take Political Science 3913 during their third year. Students must complete Political Science 3913 with a minimum grade of B before they may enroll in Political Science 4923, which they must also complete with a minimum grade of B. Students in Political Science may count the following Great Ideas courses toward their Major or Honours programmes: GRID 2006/2106, 2206, 3306 and 3506. Students who have taken POLS 1006 and GRID 2006/2106 will have satisfied the POLS 2803 and 2813 requirement for the Honours and Majors programmes. Students must, however, satisfy the minimum credit requirements in those programmes. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Economics

St. Thomas University
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Fredericton

The Department of Economics at St. Thomas brings the strengths of a critical liberal arts education to the study of the economy. We study different ways regions, large and small, manage their resources—whether those resources be financial, natural, goods, or services. The study of Economics takes a critical look at how regions trade, price, consume, and distribute. [+]

The Department of Economics at St. Thomas brings the strengths of a critical liberal arts education to the study of the economy. We study different ways regions, large and small, manage their resources—whether those resources be financial, natural, goods, or services. The study of Economics takes a critical look at how regions trade, price, consume, and distribute. It is the job of an economist to be an expert in understanding the various economies in which she or he works and to prepare best practice advice for the benefit of his or her region. Our students investigate not only how the economy works, but where it came from, the challenges it creates for social equality and social justice, and how people engage to modify and change existing economic relations. CRITICAL & TRANSFERABLE SKILLS As a student of Economics, you will learn to navigate through the ebb and flow nature of the economy in which you live and work. You will develop intelligence in making informed decisions and providing meaningful advice related to wealth and resources in your area. You will also sharpen your analytical skills and appreciate the value and limitations of evidence-based arguments and research. At the same time, you will gain advanced communication skills, especially in your capacity to read and analyze academic and technical writing. COMMON CAREERS AND GRADUATE PATHWAYS We believe that our liberal arts approach to the study of the economy has had some influence over the career paths of our graduates. Several of our graduates work for the public sector where the ability to think analytically, read quickly, communicate clearly, and have a sense of competing interpretations is vitally important. These capabilities are also of value for our students who work as lawyers, teachers, in business, and more. RELATED AREAS OF STUDY Economics students at St. Thomas tend to have interests in everything from Political Science to Philosophy, to Journalism, to Public Policy, to Environmental Studies, and Mathematics. Honours Students planning to attend graduate school, and those interested in advanced undergraduate studies, should enrol in the Honours Programme. Students wishing to pursue Honours should apply to the Department Chair at the end of their second year. Students need an average GPA of 3.0 in their economics courses to enter the Honours Programme, and are expected to maintain that average while in the programme. For Honours in Economics, the following courses are required: ECON 1006 Introduction to Economics (or ECON 1013 & 1023) MATH 1013 Introduction to Calculus I MATH 1023 Introduction to Calculus II ECON 2103 Microeconomic Theory I ECON 3133 Microeconomic Theory II ECON 2113 Macroeconomic Theory I ECON 3143 Macroeconomic Theory II ECON 2123 Quantitative Methods I ECON 3163 Quantitative Methods II ECON 4183 Econometrics I ECON 4193 Econometrics II ECON 4013. Mathematical Economics I ECON 4113. Mathematical Economics II ECON 4546 Honours Thesis (minimum B grade) or ECON 4533 Honours Research Project An additional 12 credit hours in economics are required to complete an Honours degree in economics. In addition, Honours students are to present a seminar to senior students and faculty as arranged by the Department. An overall average GPA of 3.0 on the economics courses specified for Honours is required to graduate with Honours. Students who do not fulfill all the requirements for Honours are automatically considered for a Major in Economics. Honours in Political Economy The regulations for Honours in Political Economy are the same as for the Honours in Economics Programme, except for the list of required courses. For Honours in political economy, the following courses are required: ECON 1006 Introduction to Economics (or ECON 1013 & 1023) ECON 2103 Microeconomic Theory I ECON 3133 Microeconomic Theory II ECON 2113 Macroeconomic Theory I ECON 3143 Macroeconomic Theory II ECON 2153 Political Economy I ECON 2123 Quantitative Methods I ECON 3233 Marxian Economics ECON 4546 Honours Thesis (minimum B grade) Three courses selected from: ECON 2203, 2213, 2223, 2303, 2403, 2423, 3323, 3333. 9 additional credit hours in economics, and 9 credit hours in cognate departments, are required to complete the requirements for an Honours degree in political economy. Major Students who elect a Major in Economics usually do so at the beginning of their second year; this enables them to take their economics courses in the best sequence. Students may elect a Major in Economics at the beginning of their third year, but their options may be restricted. For a Major in Economics, 36 credit hours are required, including: ECON 1006 Introduction to Economics (or ECON 1013 & 1023) ECON 2103 Microeconomic Theory I ECON 2113 Macroeconomic Theory I ECON 2123 Quantitative Methods I And at least one of the following: ECON 2153, 3133, 3143, 3163, or 3173. The remaining courses are electives; of these, at least one must be selected from each of the following subject areas: - Political Economy - International Economy - Canadian Institutions and Policy See specific listings below. Students majoring in economics are eligible for the Work-Study Project, ECON 4506, in their fourth year. Major in Economics with a Business Option In addition to fulfilling the requirements for a Major in Economics, students selecting the business option are required to complete 18 credit hours in business, including: Required Courses (6 credit hours) BUSI 1015 Introduction to Business BUSI 2023 Introduction to Financial Accounting Elective Courses (12 credit hours) Available from STU BUSI 3013 Personal Financial Planning BUSI 3023 Nonprofit Management BUSI 3033 Labour Relations and Collective Bargaining BUSI 3513 Introduction to Industrial and Organizational Psychology (PSYC 3533) Elective Courses (12 credit hours) Available from UNB ADM 1313 Principles of Marketing ADM 2223 Managerial Accounting ADM 2413 Principles of Finance ADM 2513 Organizational Behaviour ADM 3123 Business Law I ADM 3415 Corporate Finance ADM 3445 Personal Financial Planning ADM 3155 International Business Students enter this program after completing ECON 1006 or ECON 1013 & 1023.The required courses are to be completed first. UNB Business courses (ADM) are restricted to those in the business option. Minor Students wishing to pursue a Minor in economics are required to take 18 credit hours of economics courses, including ECON 1006 or 1013 & 1023. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Anthropology

St. Thomas University
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Fredericton

Anthropology is unique in being a hands-on field of study. Anthropology can be done wherever people are, and wherever people were. As a student of Anthropology at St. Thomas, you can expect to get out there in the real world, interacting with people in a variety of social contexts, excavating artifacts, and analyzing bones in our anthropology laboratory. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. Anthropology is unique in being a hands-on field of study. Anthropology can be done wherever people are, and wherever people were. As a student of Anthropology at St. Thomas, you can expect to get out there in the real world, interacting with people in a variety of social contexts, excavating artifacts, and analyzing bones in our anthropology laboratory. Cultural anthropologists, social anthropologists, and linguists typically spend years living with particular groups of people, participating in their everyday lives. This process of long-term, small-scale, intensive and detailed study allows them to understand some of the most fundamental aspects of human existence which only reveal themselves in this way. Archaeologists also conduct long-term fieldwork examining human material culture, excavating, documenting, and analyzing artifacts as a means of answering the same questions about human existence. Physical anthropologists study human skeletal remains not only to understand our physical past and development, but also in modern-day criminal forensic investigations. CRITICAL & TRANSFERABLE SKILLS Living and working in today’s world increasingly means interacting with people from many different cultural backgrounds. The skills developed through completing a degree in Anthropology enables graduates to become critical thinkers and effective communicators who are able to generate relevant information and make informed decisions. According to the American Anthropological Association, anthropological training concentrates on three transferable skill areas: “understanding human diversity, building research skills for collecting and making sense of information, and communicating effectively.” COMMON CAREERS AND GRADUATE PATHWAYS Studying Anthropology can open doors to positions in research institutions, non-profit associations, museums, government agencies, educational institutions, world organizations, and private corporations. Anthropologists may work anywhere where there is a need to manage, evaluate and interpret data on human behaviour. If you are creative, a background in Anthropology can be an asset in documentary fi lm or the music industry. The ethnographic research skills learned in Anthropology are even used in areas of market and consumer research, and anthropologists work for some of the world’s largest advertising firms, as well as other large corporate organizations. RELATED AREAS OF STUDY As a holistic discipline, focusing on interrelationships, Anthropology has direct links to several of the sciences and humanities, such as History, Psychology, Sociology, Economics, Geography, Philosophy, Biology, Ecology, Literary Studies, Music, Religion, Political Science, Languages. Since Anthropology overlaps in important ways with virtually every other discipline represented at St. Thomas, our discipline may form an ideal double-major with another discipline. Honours in Anthropology To gain entry to the honours programme, students must have a minimum 3.5 grade point average for all university courses. To earn an honours degree, students must obtain a minimum 3.5 grade point average on forty-eight credit hours in Anthropology courses, including the required courses, and a minimum B grade on the honours thesis (ANTH-4666). Students intending to complete the honours programme in Anthropology must consult a faculty advisor and present an application to the Department of Anthropology no later than the last day of February of the year preceding the anticipated graduation date. Students wishing to pursue the honours programme are required to complete a minimum of 48 credit hours in Anthropology, including all of the following required courses: - ANTH-1013. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - ANTH-1023. Introduction to Physical Anthropology - One archaeology course at the 2000 level - Two area ethnography courses - ANTH-3806. Readings in Anthropological Theory - ANTH-3913. Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods - ANTH-4003. Issues in Anthropology - ANTH-4666. Honours Thesis Major in Anthropology Majors must meet with their department chair to declare their Anthropology major. Students majoring in Anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours in Anthropology, including all of the following required courses: - ANTH-1013. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - ANTH-1023. Introduction to Physical Anthropology - One archaeology course at the 2000 level - Two area ethnography courses - ANTH-3806. Readings in Anthropological Theory - ANTH-3913. Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods - ANTH-4003. Issues in Anthropology Minor in Anthropology Students minoring in Anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in Anthropology, including all of the following: - ANTH-1013. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - ANTH-1023. Introduction to Physical Anthropology - One area ethnography course Minor in Forensic Anthropology Forensic Anthropology intersects with both anthropological and forensic studies. It is a specialty within the subdiscipline of physical anthropology and, because it deals with the analysis of human skeletal remains in a medico-legal context, it has applications for forensic science. Prospective students are advised that ANTH-1023 is not a prerequisite for any of the required courses; that the required courses are to be taken in the order listed, with each a prerequisite of the subsequent course; and that ANTH-4443 has an enrolment limit of 25 with admission requiring permission of the instructor. Students minoring in Forensic Anthropology are required to complete a minimum of 18 credit hours, of which 9 credit hours are from the required courses and a minimum of 9 credit hours from the optional courses: Required Courses ANTH-2443. Human Skeletal Biology ANTH-3443. Forensic Osteology and Archaeology ANTH-4443. Applied Forensic Anthropology Optional Courses ANTH-1023. Introduction to Physical Anthropology ANTH-1033. Introduction to Archaeology ANTH-2413. Human Physical Variation and Variability BIOL-1503. Principles of Biology: Part I BIOL-1513. Principles of Biology: Part II CRIM-1013. Introduction to Criminology CRIM-1023. Introduction to Criminal Justice HMRT-2003. Introduction to Human Rights HMRT-3123. International Human Rights [-]

BS in Information Technology

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Vancouver Campus
Campus Full time 122 hours September 2017 Canada Vancouver

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program in Information Technology (IT) offers an interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on Information Technology and Computer Science. In addition, the program is unique in that it merges traditional academic topics with leading edge and current IT practices and technology. [+]

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program in Information Technology (IT) offers an interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on Information Technology and Computer Science. In addition, the program is unique in that it merges traditional academic topics with leading edge and current IT practices and technology. The overarching goal of the program is to prepare students with broad, integrated IT knowledge including communications, computer networking, computer-based systems, database management, software development, website development, digital media and electronic publishing. Students learn how to evaluate current and emerging technologies; identify user needs; design user-friendly interfaces; apply, configure and manage technologies; and assess the impact of technologies on individuals, organizations and society. Students majoring in Information Technology in the Gildhart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering complete courses in Network and Systems Administration and Web Technology. These courses provide students with the competencies necessary to plan, customize and manage secure network and operating system configurations for optimum business applications and plan, design and maintain professional quality websites and internet applications for e-commerce and other business applications. These courses may also lead to certification in IT fields such as CompTIA A+, Network+ and Security+, and they may provide practicum experiences to qualified students. In addition, certification exam vouchers are provided as part of the program. Career Pathways Graduates of Fairleigh Dickinson University's B.S. in Information Technology program are qualified IT professionals who are prepared for careers in a wide-range of IT-related areas, as follows: Computer networking Network and systems administration Website development and management Digital media design Management information systems (MIS) Database management Software development The Vancouver Campus is a member of CompTIA's "Education to Career" program. Graduates of FDU-Vancouver's B.S. in Information Technology program are encouraged to complete IT certification exams as part of their program, ensuring that they are "market-ready" when they graduate. Career Opportunities Information technology (IT) is credited with being a major factor in increased productivity and the driving force behind the global economy. There is a great demand for IT professionals in North America ensuring graduates strong employment opportunities following successful completion of the program. Vancouver's proximity to Seattle and the Silicon Valley, which are home to a great number of IT companies including Microsoft, Electronic Arts and Cisco Systems to mention a few, gives its students another great advantage in terms of pursuing their career goals in IT. Students in the B.S. in Information Technology program must complete a minimum of 122 credit hours of course work. The distribution is: Mathematics, Science, and Programming Requirements 21 credits Liberal Arts Requirements 20 credits IT Core Requirements 54 credits Free Electives 27 credits Total 122 credits The curriculum plan (also referred to as "checksheet") for the BSIT program with Minor in Business Administration is available here. The curriculum plan for the BSIT program without a Minor is available here. Program Objectives and Outcomes for the B.S. in Information Technology Program Objectives The main objective of the B.S. in Information Technology is to produce graduates who: Enter into and advance in the profession of information technology, management information systems, business administration, or other related fields. Continue their education by obtaining professional certificates or advanced degrees in information technology, management information systems, business administration, or other related fields. Continue to conduct themselves as both responsible professionals and global citizens, who are aware of ethical issues and societal needs and problems. The program objectives define the skills, knowledge, and attributes that graduates are expected to possess three to four years following graduation, and they fulfill the needs of our several University constituencies, including alumni, students, the Industrial Advisory Committee, the faculty, and employers. These objectives are consistent with the mission of Fairleigh Dickinson University “to educate and prepare students as world citizens through global education.” Project Outcomes Upon or before graduation, each information technology (IT) graduate will possess the knowledge, skills, abilities, and attributes to: Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline. Analyze a problem and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution. Design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component or program to meet desired needs. Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal. Understand professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences. Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations and society. Recognize the need for and engage in continuing professional development. Use current techniques, skills and tools necessary for computing practice. Use and apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies. Identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems. Effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment. Understand best practices and standards and their application. Assist in the creation of an effective project plan. Understand major features of a business system and how functional areas (i.e., accounting, finance, information technology, information management, marketing, and organizational behavior) work in relation to the entire operation. [-]

BS in Business Administration

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Vancouver Campus
Campus Full time 150 hours September 2017 Canada Vancouver

The International Business concentration prepares students to understand and effectively participate in the management of business firms operating in a multinational environment. Courses examine in-depth theories and applied concepts relevant to conducting business in a competitive global arena. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. The International Business concentration prepares students to understand and effectively participate in the management of business firms operating in a multinational environment. Courses examine in-depth theories and applied concepts relevant to conducting business in a competitive global arena. Business Program Highlights Transformative Learning Experiences and Professional Development Activities Individualized full-semester mentoring experience with an experienced professional Dedicated course focused on business planning for most majors Management of a virtual business through a business simulation Professional development experiences, including résumé preparation and critique, mock interviews, presentation skills and networking skills Credit-bearing internship opportunities Study abroad opportunities at FDU international campuses in England and Vancouver Opportunity to study in the Global Business Experience Program completing two semesters abroad A Global Focus for Business Leadership in the 21st Century Consistent with FDU's global education mission, students in the Silberman College of Business benefit from unique University resources such as the Virtual Global Faculty, FDU's privileged relationship with the United Nations, and regular activities that expand a student’s understanding of business in a global environment. An Outstanding and Comprehensive Four Year Program General Education Requirements (English, Math, Science and Humanities) Business Core (common courses offering a strong foundation in all business disciplines - Accounting, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Information Systems and Decisions Sciences, International Business, Business Law, Management, Marketing, and Taxation) Business Major Courses (specialized courses in a chosen discipline) Direct Admission into the College of Business Business studies and developmental program begin in the freshman year OR upon transfer into the College. Students will immediately benefit from applied activities that expand knowledge and personal skills. 150-hour Program Option for Accounting Majors Students can earn both a B.S. and an M.S. degree in Accounting in four years plus one semester FDU graduates have obtained some of the highest CPA scores in the country Excellent internship opportunities Consistently strong placement rates AACSB Accredited Silberman College of Business is among the elite group of schools accredited by AACSB International, a confirmation of our commitment to quality business education. [-]

Bachelor of Science: Mathematics

University of Windsor
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Windsor

At the University of Windsor, you can pursue programs in mathematics, statistics, actuarial science, math and computer science or combine math study with other disciplines such as physics, chemistry, economics, music and English. [+]

At the University of Windsor, you can pursue programs in mathematics, statistics, actuarial science, math and computer science or combine math study with other disciplines such as physics, chemistry, economics, music and English. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The department’s selection of courses is comprehensive, allowing students to focus on any combination of applied mathematics (operational research), pure mathematics, nance, actuarial science, statistics, or numerical analysis, while building a solid and broad foundation. Our programs include a core of rigorous courses designed to develop your mathematical problem- solving and communication skills, to increase your knowledge of mathematical structures and applications, and to enrich your spirit through exposure to the beauty of mathematics. Our undergraduate education is thorough, and graduates of our department may expect to be well-prepared to excel in professional programs or in graduate programs in mathematics, statistics, or such related areas as economics. Our students enjoy exceptional access to faculty and individual attention due to small class size and research opportunities. Beginning in their second year, students may work one-on-one with faculty on research during the academic year through the Outstanding Scholars’ program and during the summer through NSERC undergraduate research awards. Our programs allow you the exibility to specialize in whichever mathematical science or multidisciplinary study appeals to you. You may graduate with a broad general education, preparing you for diverse career paths, or with deep preparation in a specialty of your choice. The opportunities to engage in quality research, acquire teamwork skills, and develop the nucleus for a network of close professional friendships have helped our graduates succeed. Excellent Student Resources Our faculty members are dedicated teachers and researchers in several mathematical specializations with the common goal of providing an excellent education. You will have access to a computer lab, a Math and Stats Learning Centre to assist students, and exceptional library resources that support undergraduate and graduate programs. We are also an official exam site for the Society of Actuaries and offer preparation sessions for their exams. Career Tracks Industrial and academic research and development Government, medical, and financial institutions Actuarial science Statistics Operations research analyst Education (with additional studies) Computer science Economics Consulting Management Graduate programs in mathematics, statistics, actuarial science, operations research and such related fields such as economics Law (with additional studies) Medicine (with additional studies) Our graduates' excellent reputation has led to companies visiting our department each year to recruit them for a variety of positions. According to yearly editions of The Jobs Rated Almanac, which rates the top 250 jobs using such criteria as income, outlook, security, stress and work environment, careers based on mathematics make up the bulk of the Top 10 jobs. In 2011, mathematician was second, actuary was third, and statistician was fourth. Most of the top 100 involved math. Admission Requirements Six Grade 12 U or M courses including ENG4U, MHF4U and MCV4U SPH4U is recommended. Choose UWindsor The University of Windsor offers 190 high-quality programs in an international setting. Equally important, you can experience a broad range of opportunities outside the classroom. You can explore exchange opportunities with dozens of universities around the world. Enhance your work experience through co-op programs, internships and paid, research assistantships. Student-led organizations play a vital role on campus and in the broader community. The diversity of our students—where they are from, what they believe and how they think—will expand your mind. [-]

Bachelor of Science: Environmental Science

University of Windsor
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Windsor

If you have a natural curiosity and concern about such issues as climate change, pollution, biodiversity, and sustainability, Environmental Science offers you exciting career opportunities. It applies scientific tools from such disciplines as biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and geography, and allows the integration and application of these to field and laboratory studies. [+]

Bachelors of Science in Canada 2017. If you have a natural curiosity and concern about such issues as climate change, pollution, biodiversity, and sustainability, Environmental Science offers you exciting career opportunities. It applies scientific tools from such disciplines as biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and geography, and allows the integration and application of these to field and laboratory studies. Environmental scientists use scientific tools and principles to study the biological, physical, and chemical components that comprise our environment and how they interact and respond to human influences. At UWindsor, we apply an integrated systems approach to provide you with the knowledge necessary for sustainable development of resources and for the management and mitigation of environmental change. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The Great Lakes system is the largest freshwater resource in the world. The City of Windsor is located at its centre — a great laboratory to study important environmental problems and solutions on both global and local levels. Our faculty members include internationally renowned scientists who carry out research on a variety of environmental problems. Our classes will provide you with a focused learning experience. Our faculty members often invite their students to become directly involved in research projects. In addition, with appropriate course choices, you can obtain the knowledge requirements for professional accreditation such as with ECO Canada and APGO (Association of Professional Geoscientists of Ontario). You will receive a solid grounding in scienti c principles and natural processes during your first two years of study. This includes significant, hands-on experience in fieldwork and laboratories. Third- and fourth-year courses focus on such complex and evolving practical issues as impact and assessment, environmental quality, sustainability, climate change, ecosystem health and resource management. Our curriculum’s exibility in upper years allows you to specialize in various aspects of the environment, such as ecology or environmental geoscience. Required courses such as Scientific Writing and Field Techniques will provide you with the practical knowledge for career success. An Environmental Science degree is also appropriate background training for professions such as law, medicine or business—combinations that are attractive to employers. If you are interested in graduate study, we encourage you to undertake an undergraduate thesis research project. Excellent Student Resources State-of-the-art laboratory and field equipment are used throughout the program. The Resource Centre is staffed by graduate and senior undergraduate students who offer assistance with course-related questions. Dedicated classrooms provide students the opportunity for technical training in geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and environmental assessment. Career Tracks Environmental consulting companies Resource industries Industrial compliance, environmental law (with additional studies) Government sectors of environmental quality control and monitoring Environmental management and conservation Education (with additional studies) Research Admission Requirements The OSS Diploma and six Grade 12 U or M courses, including ENG4U, are required. MHF4U, SCH4U and SBI4U required. SPH4U is recommended. MCV4U is strongly recommended. Choose UWindsor The University of Windsor offers 190 high-quality programs in an international setting. Equally important, you can experience a broad range of opportunities outside the classroom. You can explore exchange opportunities with dozens of universities around the world. Enhance your work experience through co-op programs, internships and paid, research assistantships. Student-led organizations play a vital role on campus and in the broader community. The diversity of our students—where they are from, what they believe and how they think—will expand your mind. [-]