BA in Philosophy

General

Program Description

Philosophy engages and critically analyzes the perennial questions of human experiences, such as the nature of knowledge, meaning, reasoning, morality, the character of the world, God, freedom, human nature, justice, and history. Philosophy is thus significant for everyone who wishes to live and act in a reflective and critical manner. Furthermore, the student of philosophy develops critical reasoning ability, acumen in textual analysis and persuasive writing skills useful for application in all disciplines and careers.

Philosophy, broadly defined, is the systematic inquiry into some of the problems of human existence. These problems are ones which cannot be dealt with by the methods of the sciences, and ones whose structures are based strictly on rational argument. In this sense, the study of philosophy, through the broad humanistic background that it provides, has always been an essential, perhaps the most essential, ingredient of a liberal education.

Development of abilities to reflect, analyze and think critically, which result from the study of philosophy, enables the student to understand and correlate all the insights garnered from other disciplines. The varied perspectives that philosophy provides, from the fields of religion, ethics, politics, and art, guide the student in his or her search for a sound sense of values. At the same time, philosophy adds a distinctive emphasis on questions of meaning, from linguistic expressions to life itself, and calls for justification of claims to knowledge from any source.

The primary goals of the program are to contribute significantly to the liberal education of university students, to prepare majors for advanced studies in their chosen field, and to help students in their various future professional activities by acquainting them with applied philosophy.


Learning Requirements

Required Courses
PHIL-201 Logic I 3
PHIL-210 Writing Intensive Program: Arguing Philosophically 3
PHIL-213 Ethics 3
History of Philosophy (2 courses)1 6
Contemporary Philosophy (1 course)2 3
PHIL 380's: Seminar in Philosophy3 3
Electives at the 300-level 6
Additional Electives 6
Total Hours 33

1. History of Philosophy courses include PHIL 222: History of Ancient Philosophy, PHIL 231: History of Medieval Philosophy, PHIL 241: History of Modern Philosophy, PHIL 390: Classical Political Theory, PHIL 391: Modern Political Theory.

2. Contemporary Philosophy courses include PHIL 332: Contemporary Philosophy, PHIL 362: Philosophy of Law, PHIL 364: Critical Race Theory, PHIL 365: Environmental Ethics, PHIL 367: Post-Colonialism, PHIL 370: Rethinking Race and Gender, PHIL 373: Advanced Feminist Philosophy, PHIL 392: Contemporary Political Theory.

3. One of the following: PHIL 393: Seminar in Ethics, PHIL 394: Seminar in Epistemology, PHIL 395: Seminar in Metaphysics, PHIL 396: Seminar in History of Philosophy, PHIL 397: Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy.

Last updated Oct 2018

About the School

Pursue your goals with top-notch faculty and small class sizes. Explore over 80 rigorous programs in the arts, sciences, education, and business. At Northeastern, find yourself among a welcoming and d ... Read More

Pursue your goals with top-notch faculty and small class sizes. Explore over 80 rigorous programs in the arts, sciences, education, and business. At Northeastern, find yourself among a welcoming and diverse community of scholars who are as serious about their education as you are. Read less