B.A. in Interpretation Program

General

Program Description

Through an ASL-immersion experience and resources such as our award-winning interactive laboratory, you will be prepared to work in a variety of settings. Our interpretation program is open to students who are deaf, hard of hearing and hearing. 

Gallaudet University is the only university in the world that offers both an undergraduate and a graduate degree in ASL-English Interpretation. Gallaudet provides a unique opportunity for interpretation majors to live, study, and interact with Deaf people from the United States and around the world.

The B.A. in Interpretation (BAI) program consists of a comprehensive, sequenced, and integrated series of courses and experiences that are intended to provide students with knowledge, fieldwork, techniques and interpreting skills in interactive interpreting in education, medical, business and government settings. The interpreting internship varies from student to student. The BAI program mainly is in a four-year format and consists of 36 credits in the major, which includes coursework, fieldwork and field internship. Students take supporting courses in ASL and Deaf studies, biology, business, communication studies, linguistics and psychology, Part-time study is also available.

Deaf and hard of hearing prospective students must first be accepted through Undergraduate Admissions in order to apply for the BAI program. The process for declaring your major in BAI will begin upon arrival of your first semester and you will work with your Academic Advisor at this time. 

Last updated Aug 2020

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About the School

Today, Gallaudet is viewed by deaf and hearing people alike as a primary resource for all things related to deaf people, including educational and career opportunities; open communication and visual l ... Read More

Today, Gallaudet is viewed by deaf and hearing people alike as a primary resource for all things related to deaf people, including educational and career opportunities; open communication and visual learning; deaf history and culture; American Sign Language; and the impact of technology on the deaf community. Read less