Wilson College

Introduction
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Wilson College is a top liberal arts college with rigorous academic programs and so much more.

A rigorous academic program with incredible access to professors has been a hallmark of Wilson College since its founding in 1869. A collaborative environment, a 10:1 student-to-faculty ratio and professors who are dedicated to mentoring students—both in and out of the classroom—create an educational experience that is focused on the individual student.

Wilson connects career-oriented programs with a broad-based liberal arts education that teaches students to think critically and communicate with confidence—essential skills for career success. This approach is evident across all of Wilson's degree programs—undergraduate, graduate and adult degree.

Rooted in more than 140 years of a forward-thinking tradition, the College has always been a leader. From a pioneering residential program for single parents with children and the establishment of the Center for Sustainable Living 20 years ago to initiating a USDA certified-organic farm to leading the way on affordability in higher education with a first-of-its-kind student debt buyback program, Wilson continues to be a trendsetter.

Student experiences inside and outside the classroom are influenced by the Wilson Honor Principle, which fosters qualities of personal responsibility and integrity. College is a transformative time and Wilson is committed to educating the whole student: mind, body and spirit.

Our Campus

Located in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, Wilson College’s campus has gracious lawns, mature trees and rolling hills. The beautiful 300-acre campus is on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district and the Conococheague Creek runs through it.

Six buildings serve as student housing and there are several facilities for athletics and equestrian com­petitions, including three athletic fields (field hockey, soccer and softball), tennis courts, a gymnasium and separate practice facility for gymnastics. A fitness center is housed in Lenfest Commons, along with a dance studio. Students have access to a nearby swimming pool. The Penn Hall Equestrian Center has three, 24-stall barns; two indoor arenas and an outdoor arena; cross-country jump course and turn-out fields. The College also provides complete equine-facilitated therapeutic facilities and equipment.

In addition, Wilson College has an organic farm—the heart of the Fulton Center for Sustainable Living— that allows a wide range of opportunities to learn about approaches to sustainable living. In January 2009, the College opened the new $25 million Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology, the first Gold LEED-certified building in the area.

The Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology

With state-of-the-art classroom, laboratory and research spaces, the Harry R. Brooks Complex for Science, Mathematics and Technology represents a vision for the future of the liberal arts and sciences at Wilson College. Flooded with natural light and filled with leading-edge technology and equipment, the building offers spaces that enhance teaching and learning, and the practice of science at the undergraduate level. The building has transformed the campus and is changing the lives of our students and faculty. We invite you to learn more about it on these pages, or visit campus and take a tour. Envision the future of science at Wilson College and join us in this important educational mission.

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Mission and Values

Wilson College is an independent liberal arts institution founded in 1869. Wilson is dedicated to preparing women and men for successful careers through undergraduate, graduate and adult degree programs. Guided by the Honor Principle and distinguished by a commitment to transformative student growth, Wilson College prepares all of its graduates for fulfilling lives and professions, ethical leadership and humane stewardship of our communities and our world.

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Programs

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Bachelor

Bachelor Degree in Communications

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

Wilson College’s major in Communications balances critical thinking, media theory, and writing skills for use in both traditional media markets and today’s emerging digital media forms. Students will study the foundations of communications learning—i.e., journalistic writing, legal media issues, and media theory—and use that learning in traditional forms of media as well as online and digital media. In the process, students will create content for both print and digital publications and learn the fundamentals of marketing media and selling advertising. [+]

Welcome to the Wilson College Department of Communications! In these web pages you can learn all about the Communications major and minor at Wilson College, about our current faculty, and about the various organizations and activities sponsored by the department. Wilson College’s major in Communications balances critical thinking, media theory, and writing skills for use in both traditional media markets and today’s emerging digital media forms. Students will study the foundations of communications learning—i.e., journalistic writing, legal media issues, and media theory—and use that learning in traditional forms of media as well as online and digital media. In the process, students will create content for both print and digital publications and learn the fundamentals of marketing media and selling advertising. Students who graduate from Wilson with a degree in Communications will have an array of marketable skills, including learning AP Style, designing print and online media frames, crafting public relations and advertising for a variety of industry purposes, and mastering a wide array of technical and software skills for use on traditional and electronic media. Students will gain additional skills in computer programming, graphic and website design, photography, and marketing, all of which positions the Wilson graduate for success in both the workforce and in graduate school. Internships take place in local media markets and include exposure to both traditional and online forms of media. By the completion of the degree program students will be ready to tackle the ever-evolving world of new and digital media and still understand the foundations of traditional media forms and styles. Wilson College has a successful track record in educating students in the Communications field. Recent graduates have been offered jobs writing for daily newspapers, editing nationally distributed magazines, writing for publications in the equestrian field, working in public relations at a large industrial firm, working for federal and state government agencies, teaching speech and journalism to high school students, working as a segment producer in a television station, working as on-air announcer in a radio station, and working in human resources for a major international company. Other graduates have gone directly on to graduate study at schools like Syracuse University, the Art Institute of Chicago, Shippensburg University, and numerous others. All Wilson graduates, regardless of major, are required to complete an assessment of the learning outcomes in their major. As a Communications major, you will complete your assessment within a structured classroom setting designed to optimize the experience to allow you to demonstrate your mastery of the field. Course Requirements Media Writing and Design COM 105 Introduction to Media Communication COM 130 Interactive Communication and Design I COM 201 Journalism COM 230 Interactive Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising COM 303 Media Law in a Digital Age COM 304 Media Theory COM 355 Internship COM 400 Assessment Portfolio (.5 credit) COM BB Billboard (for one course credit total) Plus four courses from among the following: BUS 223 Marketing Management CS 150 Programming and Design I CS 152 Programming and Design II ENG 212 Technical Writing FA 118 Introduction to Photography FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III (Web Design) A students may substitue a relevant topics class with permission of their academic adviser and the program director. Note: Students must complete courses in at least two of the four disciplines above. At least two of the four courses must be completed at the 200-level or higher. Course Requirements Graphic Media Concentration in Graphic Media The Graphic Media concentration in Graphic Design focuses on a broader application of Graphic Design, combining courses in artistic content and creation with courses in traditional and social media writing and design. This generates the profile of a student who is very career-focused and, in many instances, may already be working in some capacity in the field. Students in this concentration will develop a foundational mixture of visual and written cultural abilities, and will be more well-rounded but less specialized than students majoring in either Graphic Arts or Communications. These students are mostly on the career track, and will be able to step into a wide variety of jobs that requires both artistic skills and writing content creation. FA 114 Drawing I FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III COM 130 Digital Communication and Design I COM 230 Digital Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic media majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography, and printmaking. For more information about majors in Graphic Design, please see the homepage for the Graphic Design major. Associate Degree in Communications Associate of Arts in Communications The Associate of Arts degree in Communications is designed to allow the student to develop competencies as an oral, written, and visual communicator in a liberal arts context. Students who graduate from Wilson with an Associate of Arts degree in Communications will have an array of marketable skills, including mastering AP Style, designing print and online media frames, crafting public relations and advertising for a variety of industry purposes, and mastering a wide array of technical and software skills for use on traditional and electronic media. This degree will best serve the interests of the student who is contemplating a career in business, advertising, public relations, or the media. Minor in Communications COM105 Introduction to Communications Plus four additional courses, with at least one at the 300 level. Students often choose to minor in Communications to increase their writing skills in preparation for the job market. Related Minors English Theater Film Studies [-]

Bachelor Degree in Graphic Design

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. [+]

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. Students select from concentrations in graphic arts or graphic media. The graphic arts track emphasizes visual content development, composition and creation, and is suited to fine arts students who wish to pursue the practice of graphic design as a primary profession. The graphic media concentration—designed to provide students with training in visual communication—incorporates courses like writing and digital media with design classes, giving students a broader base of skills for work in communications and marketing-related professions. No matter which concentration is pursued, the graphic design major prepares students to be effective visual communications professionals. Working in both traditional and digital mediums, students learn to conceptualize, design and produce in a variety of design disciplines, including advertising, packaging, editorial or magazine design, websites and more. Senior capstone work focuses on the development of a student’s portfolio, an essential component in obtaining future employment. The portfolio represents a cohesive body of work that demonstrates the skill and proficiency of the designer. Graduates of the graphic design program are prepared for both immediate design practice and lifelong intellectual and creative growth. Concentration In Graphic Media Course Requirements Concentration in Graphic Media The Graphic Media concentration in Graphic Design focuses on a broader application of Graphic Design, combining courses in artistic content and creation with courses in traditional and social media writing and design. This generates the profile of a student who is very career-focused and, in many instances, may already be working in some capacity in the field. Students in this concentration will develop a foundational mixture of visual and written cultural abilities, and will be more well-rounded but less specialized than students majoring in either Graphic Arts or Communications. These students are mostly on the career track, and will be able to step into a wide variety of jobs that requires both artistic skills and writing content creation. FA 114 Drawing I FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III COM 130 Digital Communication and Design I COM 230 Digital Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic media majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography, and printmaking. Course Requirements Graphic Arts Concentration GRAPHIC ARTS CONCENTRATION Required courses: FA 114 Drawing I DNC 147 Movement as Culture FA 242 2D Design FA 120 Graphic Design l FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II One art history course WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic design majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography or printmaking. Concentration In Graphic Arts The concentration in graphic arts focuses on content development, with an emphasis on visual content development generation, provides an artistic rigor to the traditional graphic design major. Students in this concentration study aesthetics and visual theories of artistic development, and develop strong, creative problem-solving skills. The program’s emphasis on artistic content and creation is suited to students with an interest and background in fine arts. The program is structured to contribute to successful outcomes for graduates in a wide variety of professions, as well for those who desire graduate study in the graphic arts field. Career Opportunities for Graphic Design Career Opportunities Design Disciplines Editorial Design (Magazine/Newspaper) Packaging Branding/Logo Design Advertising Publication Design Signage and Wayfinding Experience Design Exhibition Design Communication Design Website Design Interactive Design Multimedia Creative Direction Potential Employers Design Firms Web/Multimedia Design Firms Advertising Agencies Publishing Houses Magazines Higher Education Government Agencies General Corporate Retail Corporate Television Newspapers In-House Creative Groups Museums/Galleries [-]

Bachelor Degree in History and Political Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

History and Political Science is an interdisciplinary, liberal arts major. The interdisciplinary emphasis deepens understanding of the nature and development of human institutions and behavior. In particular, students gain a historical perspective which is vital to a comprehensive understanding of contemporary social and political issues. Courses in the major also increase the student’s awareness of strategies available for dealing effectively with these issues. [+]

History and Political Science is an interdisciplinary, liberal arts major. The interdisciplinary emphasis deepens understanding of the nature and development of human institutions and behavior. In particular, students gain a historical perspective which is vital to a comprehensive understanding of contemporary social and political issues. Courses in the major also increase the student’s awareness of strategies available for dealing effectively with these issues. The program emphasizes development of skills useful in various occupations as well as in graduate school. Course work stresses development of verbal and written communication skills and analytical thinking. Small class sizes allow faculty members to frequently use innovative teaching methods, including simulations and collaborative learning. While breadth of knowledge in the major is emphasized, students also concentrate in an area of their choice. Concentrations are offered in these areas: History, International Relations, Political Science, and Thematic. A certificate for secondary teaching in Social Studies is also available. Concentrations History and Political Science Concentration in History Five courses in history, two of which must be at the 300 level, and two additional courses in political science. Students fulfilling a humanities focus in the history concentration may substitute two courses in classics, art history, music history, literature, philosophy, or religion studies for Sociology 120 and Economics 101 or 102 (see Course Requirements tab). Concentration in Political Science Five courses in political science, to include work in American government and international politics, with at least three of the five courses taken at the 300 level. Two additional courses in history. Thematic Concentration This option is available for students who wish to design their own program in area studies, such as European studies or American studies, or in a policy area of particular interest. The program is designed with a department adviser and includes seven additional courses, at least two of which are taken at the 300 level. Course Requirements History and Political Science ECO 101: Introduction to Macroeconomics or ECO 102: Introduction to Microeconomics* One of the following three HIS 110: Ancient and Mediterranean World HIS 111: Medieval and Early Modern Europe HIS 112: Modern European History One of the following three: HIS 124: American History to 1865 HIS 125: American History 1865-1945 HIS 126: American History Since 1945 HIS/PS 399: Senior Thesis PS 110 Introduction to Political Science PS 120: American Government SOC 120: Introduction to Sociology* Optional Courses: All majors are encouraged to take HIS/PS 355: Internship SOC 280: Qualitative Methods and Social Research In addition to the requirements above, one of the following concentrations will be completed: History, Political Science, or a Thematic Concentration. See the "Concentrations" tab to view the requirements for these concentrations. *Note: For the history concentration, the requirements in Economics (ECO 101 or ECO 102) and Sociology (SOC 120) may be replaced with two humanities courses for those who seek a humanities-oriented major. Student Learning Goals History and Political Science Goal #1: Acquisition and comprehension of content knowledge Students have a broad understanding of the significant developments in Western European and American History Students have knowledge of political institutions, processes, and theories and knowledge of fields in political science, including American government, political theory, and international studies Goal #2: Attainment of skills: written communication, oral communication, research, critical thinking and analysis Students are able to write with clarity and precision in various forms and in a manner which reflects acquired knowledge Students are able to speak effectively in a discussion group and present their work to audiences, using technological innovation where appropriate Students are able to effectively utilize a variety of sources – primary and secondary—and show mastery of research techniques Utilizing these skills, students will be able to formulate and defend a thesis, consider conflicting evidence and interpretations, critically examine sources, analyze change over time, and apply evidence Goal #3: Obtain an awareness of and appreciation for diversity Students gain a knowledge of and appreciation for issues related to race, class, gender and ethnicity in historical and political context Students will learn from others who are different than themselves, thereby engaging in a robust exchange of ideas that works to broaden their perspectives, promote thinking skills, enhance leadership and personal skills, and promote democratic values Career Opportunities History and Political Science History and Political Science is an excellent introduction to the study of law. Virtually all Wilson alumnae who have applied to law schools have been accepted. Career choices include: politics or government service, social service, publishing, librarianship, teaching, museum work, journalism, business, or criminal justice. Some careers require graduate study. Wilson has an excellent record in graduate school placements. Students are assisted in planning their academic programs to meet the needs of advanced degree programs. [-]

BSc

Bachelor of Science in Biology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The curriculum in biology provides thorough and intensive course work in both theoretical and applied aspects of biological science. Active participation by the students in laboratory and field courses is required and direct experience with living organisms and scientific instrumentation is a central focus of the program. [+]

The curriculum in biology provides thorough and intensive course work in both theoretical and applied aspects of biological science. Active participation by the students in laboratory and field courses is required and direct experience with living organisms and scientific instrumentation is a central focus of the program. The science of biology is taught within the larger context of a liberal arts education and every effort is made to encourage interdisciplinary connections with the social sciences and the humanities. Courses strongly emphasize writing and speaking skills and avoid reducing science to the accumulation of factual knowledge. Majors are encouraged to pursue summer internships in field and laboratory settings. An undergraduate degree in biology offers a variety of career options, including technical positions in business and medicine. Many graduates earn advanced degrees in medical and veterinary schools or do graduate research in such fields as biochemistry and ecology. Students with expertise in genetics, physiology, and environmental science are increasingly in demand in business and government. Undergraduate work in the sciences provides the student with skills in research and the clarity of thought and communication essential for success in the contemporary world. Student Learning Goals To provide a broad foundation in the biological sciences. To engage students in the methods of scientific inquiry. To develop effective communication skills and foster independent thought and creativity. To promote critical analysis and scientific literacy within an ethical framework. To promote interdisciplinary study and the foundations of a liberal arts education. Events and Projects Marine Biology Field Trip When the marine biology course is offered in the fall, the students in the course participate in a field trip to Wallop's Island Marine Science Consortium located on the Chesapeake Bay. Students have the opportunity to visit a wide range of habitats including low and high energy beaches, mud flats, salt marshes, uninhabited dunes, maritime forests and inter tidal waters. We also spend time out on the water trawling for organisms that are found in the coastal waters that line the bay. An evening trip to catch bio-luminescent ctenophores is always a highlight. Invasive Species Removal on the Interpretive Trail Wilson College is fortunate to have an interpretive trail on campus that includes a natural wetland, grassland area and forest. However, like most natural areas today, the trail is plagued with invasive plant species. During the fall of 2005, the Conservation Biology course decided to tackle the issue of invasive species and decide how best to return the trail to its natural state. The students chose three plots where invasives would be removed as well as two control plots. One control plot was relatively free of invasives and one plot had a very large percentage of invasives. During the course of the semester, the students identified all the plants in the plot and physically removed all invasive species. The goal is to have students from other classes continue the project and determine if the invasive removal was successful. General Biology Course at Caledonia Each spring, the students enrolled in the General Biology course take a trip to Caledonia State Park to conduct some field research. They collect samples from the stream, identify plant life along the trails and attempt to find some interesting fungi. Physical and Life Sciences Symposium At the end of the fall semester each year, the senior biology and chemistry majors present their research projects at the Physical and Life Sciences Symposium. This research was proposed by the student in the spring of their junior year and the research was conducted during the summer and fall. Each student chooses their own topic and conducts the research independently under the nominal guidance of a faculty member. Some of the abstracts from recent projects can be found on the student research page. Pennsylvania Academy of Sciences The Pennsylvania Academy of Sciences holds their annual meeting each spring and many of the Wilson seniors present their research at this scientific meeting. This meeting is attended by faculty and students from across the state and provides an opportunity to share current data and research ideas. Some of the presentations from recent years are listed below. Course Requirements BIO 101: General Biology I BIO 102: General Biology II CHM 101: General Chemistry I CHM 102: General Chemistry II or CHM 103: Fundamentals of General Chemistry CHM 201: Organic Chemistry I CHM 202: Organic Chemistry II or CHM 104: Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry MAT 130: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I MAT 140: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II BIO 398: Design and Methods of Scientific Research BIO 400: Senior Research Seminar I BIO 402: Senior Research Seminar II or EDU 433: Student Teaching - Secondary Six course credits at the 200 or 300 level, of which at least two will be at the 300 level, EXCEPT Bio 215 - Anatomy and Physiology I and 216 - Anatomy and Physiology II. The student may choose a special emphasis by selecting courses from one of the following groups: General BIO 208: Genetics BIO 210: Introductory Botany BIO 211: Microbiology BIO 270, 370: Topics in Biology BIO 302: Developmental Biology BIO 306: Immunology BIO 310: Molecular Cell Biology I BIO 317: Basic Techniques of Electron Microscopy Biochemistry and Physiology BIO 205: Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates BIO 207: Vertebrate Physiology BIO 209: Nutrition BIO 304: Histology BIO 312: Molecular and Cell Biology II CHM 310: Biochemistry Ecology and Evolutionary Biology BIO 206: Invertebrate Zoology BIO 230: Conservation Biology BIO 309: Evolution BIO 314: Ecology [-]

Bachelor of Science in Equestrian Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

All students who wish to ride are evaluated and classified as beginner, novice, intermediate, or advanced according to their demonstrated skills. Students are grouped with riders of comparable skills in small classes. Equitation is considered a physical education activity and, as such, earns one-half course credit. [+]

Wilson College offers two concentrations within the Equestrian Studies major: Equine Management and Equestrian Management. Equine Management Concentration The student interested primarily in the management of a barn will select the Equine Management concentration. This program directs the student's interests to the mechanics of running a stable and the handling of horses within a barn, including practical stable management. The Equine Management concentration requires two business-related courses. Equestrian Management Concentration The student primarily interested in riding and the teaching of riding will select the Equestrian Management concentration. The program improves skills in riding and provides an education focused on teaching. In addition to equestrian courses, both concentrations include courses in biology, psychology, physical education, and veterinary medical technology. The Equestrian Management concentration also requires an educational psychology course. All students who wish to ride are evaluated and classified as beginner, novice, intermediate, or advanced according to their demonstrated skills. Students are grouped with riders of comparable skills in small classes. Equitation is considered a physical education activity and, as such, earns one-half course credit. All students, regardless of major, may take as many equitation courses as their schedules can accommodate. The student in the Equestrian Management track may apply a maximum of three and one-half equitation course credits (seven semesters) toward graduation requirements. Other majors and students concentrating in equine management may apply not more than one and one-half course credits (three semesters) toward graduation requirements. Wilson College emphases a classical approach to balanced seat riding. Equestrian Studies Students are trained to be in self carriage with independent aids and seat such that they can influence the horse with maximum sensitivity and harmony with an emphasis on riding the horse correctly from back to front in all the disciplines. After mastery of the mechanics and schooling figures, riders are trained to influence and reshape their horses with patience and professionalism as they will in their careers. There is no emphasis on the short quick fix in any discipline. Riding Lessons Placement Testing All riders take a simple riding test during the summer or winter before the first riding class. Safety is the primary consideration in testing and placement of all riders. Class Levels Riding classes are divided into the following levels: Basic Level (I and II) Novice Level (I and II) Intermediate Level (I, II, III, IV, V, VI) Advanced Level (I, II, III, IV) Specialization Level (I, II, III, IV, V, VI) Specialization Classes The most advanced riders may choose one or more discipline-specific courses in riding: Dressage, Eventing, Hunters and Hunt Seat, Jumpers, and Schooling Green/Problem Horses. Scheduling Riding Classes Riding classes are scheduled as part of each student’s regular course load. Each course carries 0.5 credits, and meets twice a week for 75 minutes each class. Riders are placed in classes with others of the most similar level, ability, and discipline interest Lab Classes The Equestrian Center serves as the “hands-on classroom” for lab and practicum classes in Equestrian Studies and Equine Facilitated Therapeutics. Classes are scheduled to allow students to watch demonstrations, practice skills, and work alongside professionals in classes of all types and levels. Examples of Equestrian lab and practicum classes at Wilson College include: Applied Horse Training Techniques Training the Therapy Horse Teaching Horsemanship Student-Teacher Practicum Equine Health Management Labs Equine Facility Management Labs Equine Facilitated Therapeutics Teaching Practicum Management of Equine Events Practicum Equine Performance Management Labs Equestrian Management Course Requirements BIO 101: General Biology or BIO 110: Contemporary Biology EDU 207: Adolescent Development Cognition and Learning EQS 110: Introduction to Equine Management EQS 116: Equine Anatomy and Physiology EQS 220: Management of Equine Events EQS 230: Introduction to Training the Horse EQS 235: Applied Horse Training Techniques I EQS 240: Introduction to Teaching Horsemanship EQS 326, 327: Methods of Teaching and Training I, II EQS 328, 329: Principles and Practices of Equestrian Management I, II One additional major-related course at the 200 or 300 level, chosen in consultation with the student’s academic adviser. EQT XXX Six equitation courses, the levels of which are based on the rider’s skill ESS 145 First Aid and CPR/AED PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology Students must graduate with active first aid and CPR/AED certifications. Students who take ESS 145 as a first-year or sophomore student must repeat it during their junior or senior year in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Noncredit first aid and CPR/AED certifications will not be accepted as completion of the major requirement. Equine Management Course Requirements BUS 124: Introduction to Management One of the following six courses: ACC 105: Principles of Accounting I BUS 220, 320: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management BUS 223: Marketing Management BUS 225: Business Law ECO 101: Introduction to Macroeconomics ECO 102: Introduction to Microeconomics BIO 101: General Biology or Bio 110: Contemporary Biology And all of the following: EQS 110: Introduction to Equine Management EQS 116: Equine Anatomy and Physiology EQS 125: Equine Breeding Management EQS 220: Management of Equine Events EQS 225: Equine Health Management EQS 230: Introduction to Training the Horse EQS 240: Introduction to Teaching Horsemanship EQS 310: Equine Facility Management EQS 315: Equine Performance Management One additional major-related course at the 200 or 300 level, chosen in consultation with the student’s academic adviser. PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology ESS 145 First Aid and CPR/AED A Student must graduate with active first aid and CPR/AED certifications. Students who take ESS 145 as a first-year or sophomore student must repeat it during their junior or senior year in order to fulfill graduation requirements. Noncredit first aid and CPR/AED certifications will not be accepted as completion of the major requirement. [-]

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The Mathematics and Computer Science curriculum emphasizes theory and application of mathematical and computer science principles. Obtaining a degree in Mathematics within the framework of a liberal arts curriculum strengthens the student’s understanding of the interrelationship between the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. [+]

With the increased emphasis in science-related fields on more precise modeling of real-world situations, the need for well-trained computer scientists and mathematicians is also increasing. The Mathematics and Computer Science curriculum emphasizes theory and application of mathematical and computer science principles. Obtaining a degree in Mathematics within the framework of a liberal arts curriculum strengthens the student’s understanding of the interrelationship between the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. Some common choices for Mathematics and Computer Science graduates are graduate study and/or research in mathematics or computer science; teaching; or employment in the fields of business (actuarial science, economics, numerical analysis, programming), government (statistics, cryptology, operations research), and medicine (optometry, research medicine). Secondary certification in Math is available. One major is offered, Mathematics, as well as minors in both Mathematics and Computer Science. For the student interested in the management of information systems, an MIS minor is offered as part of the Business curriculum. For those students whose interest is primarily a Business major, a concentration in MIS is offered through the Business and Economics department. Course Requirements Mathematics Two courses from biology or chemistry or physics or computer science. Choose two from the four following options: 1. BIO 101: General Biology I BIO 102: General Biology II or 2. CHM 101: General Chemistry I CHM 102: General Chemistry II or 3. CS 152: Programming and Design II CS 235: Data Structures and File Processing or 4. PHY 101: General Physics I PHY 102: General Physics II In addition, the following: CS 150: Programming and Design I MAT 115: Introductory Statistics MAT 130: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I MAT 140: Calculus and Analytic Geometry II MAT 205: Discrete Mathematics MAT 207: Introduction to Linear Algebra MAT 242: Calculus and Analytic Geometry III MAT 308: Introduction to Abstract Algebra MAT 321: Advanced Calculus MAT 410: Senior Research Seminar Three additional 300-level courses in mathematics Note: Students who take CHM 101 and 102 or BIO 101 and 102 or CS 152 and 235 for requirements are strongly advised to take PHY 101 and 102 as electives. Student Learning Goals Mathematics Goal 1: Mathematical Communication. Students will read and write in mathematical contexts. The following outcomes align with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W1 Communication. Outcomes: communication skills are demonstrated by the student’s ability to Read and write rigorously in mathematical arguments; Present information both in writing and orally. Goal 2: Mathematical Reasoning. Students will analyze, synthesize, and interpret texts, images, experiences, or other information mathematically. The following outcomes align with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W2 Critical and Creative Thinking. Outcomes: critical and/or creative thinking skills are evidenced by the student’s ability to Demonstrate quantitative literacy; Solve problems of both an obvious and more complex nature; Review and analyze information to make a quantitative judgment of significance; or solve theoretical or practical problems. Goal 3: Mathematical Modeling. Students will formulate and apply mathematics to solve a broad spectrum of complex problems. The following outcomes align with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W7 Integration and Application of Learning. Outcomes: integration of skills and knowledge is demonstrated by the student’s ability to Make connections between theory, problem-solving and applications; Identify and use appropriate technology to simulate and visualize mathematical ideas. Goal 4: Mathematical Research. Students will conduct research, collaboratively or independently, using methods and tools that are appropriate to the mathematics. The following outcome aligns with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W3 Research. Outcome: Research skills are evidenced by the student’s ability to effectively implement the research process in the major. The following outcome aligns with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W7 Integration and Application of Learning. Outcome: Integration of skills and knowledge are evidenced by the student’s ability to extend ideas or ask new questions. Goal 5: Interdisciplinary Knowledge. Students will achieve a depth of knowledge in mathematics and breadth of knowledge through study in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages and the arts. The following outcome aligns with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W6 Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Knowledge. Outcome: Depth and breadth of knowledge are evidenced by the student’s ability to demonstrate proficiency in mathematics through required coursework in the major, including at least one capstone experience such as a senior thesis. The following outcome aligns with the WC Institutional Learning Goal W7 Integration and Application of Learning Outcome: Integration of skills and knowledge is demonstrated by the student’s ability to: Place mathematics within the overall context of the natural sciences and the liberal arts; Understand the historical and contemporary contexts in which mathematics is practiced. Computer Labs Mathematics The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science has established a Laboratory which is staffed by advanced mathematics and/or computer science students and equipped with technological resources, such as computer programs, which are used as appropriate to the student’s learning goals. There are three Computer Laboratories located on campus. They are equipped with computers, appropriate software (compilers, word processors, database managers, etc.), network connections, printing facilities and high speed Internet access. These labs are available to students any time classes are not scheduled. Lab based courses such as CS110, CS115, CS150, CS210, CS235, CS344 and others are taught in the labs so that concepts can be put into practice immediately. In addition to the computer labs, a number of computers and associated software and facilities are available in each dormitory common area and library. Network and Internet connections are also available in each residence hall. [-]

Bachelor or Science in Global Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The Global Studies program will provide you with the skill that is—and will continue to be—crucial to achievement in any field: the ability to communicate across cultural, racial, and economic and gender difference. You will also gain proficiency in a world language other than English and graduate with strong public speaking and writing skills. As such, Global Studies is an interdisciplinary program that allows you to foster greater understanding of the challenges that we face as citizens of a complex, globalized, and interconnected world. [+]

The Global Studies program will provide you with the skill that is—and will continue to be—crucial to achievement in any field: the ability to communicate across cultural, racial, and economic and gender difference. You will also gain proficiency in a world language other than English and graduate with strong public speaking and writing skills. As such, Global Studies is an interdisciplinary program that allows you to foster greater understanding of the challenges that we face as citizens of a complex, globalized, and interconnected world. While there are many ways we can go about exploring cultural difference and social, political, and economic integration, Wilson’s Global Studies program is unique when compared to others in our region. Several regional institutions offer the more traditional International Studies option, which is often limited to a nation-state relations approach to analyzing global changes. Meanwhile, Global Studies at Wilson focuses not only on international relations, but also complex forms of globalization that move outside the borders of nation-state actors. Further, core courses and areas of specialization address multiple facets of global cultures, and students are highly prepared for their future careers with service-learning/field opportunities, internships, and study abroad experiences. Mission Statement Global Studies is a cross-disciplinary program that seeks to foster understanding of the challenges that we face as citizens of an interconnected world. Students will acquire the knowledge, skills and perspectives necessary to develop cultural literacy and to comprehend complex global events and processes of globalization, as well as an ability to respond to them effectively. Why Study Global Studies? Become a culturally-aware and globally-engaged world citizen. Engage in interdisciplinary learning across such disciplines as Sociology, Political Science, History, and Foreign Languages. Achieve depth of knowledge within a chosen area of specialization (Cultural Studies, The Hispanic World, or The Francophone World). Engage in study abroad opportunities across the globe. Engage in immersion experience opportunities in the United States. Develop intercultural competencies essential for thriving within a multicultural workforce. Demonstrate to future employers or graduate schools that you are prepared for today’s global community. Job Prospects Understanding processes of national and global change is both empowering and humbling, and having the skills to navigate these changes is crucial to work-life success in the 21st century. Therefore, Global Studies majors are particularly poised to enter the workforce in a vast array of fields, including: Foreign Affairs Analysis Foreign Service and Diplomacy Global Education Global Sales Government Service with an International Focus Homeland Security Human Resources Human Services Provision Humanitarian Relief Immigration International Banking International Business International Communications International Development International Education International Human Rights International Intelligence Analysis International Law International Student Support Services Interpreting and Translating Public Administration Study Abroad Programming Travel and Tourism Course Requirements Global Studies Major Core Courses: All Global studies majors take the following ten courses. GS 100: Introduction to Global Studies FRN 205: Intermediate French or SPN 205: Intermediate Spanish or Equivalent credit in another foreign language FRN 209: Intermediate French Conversation or SPN 209: Intermediate Spanish Conversation or Equivalent credit in another foreign language GS 212: Cultural Geography GS 206: Comparative Contemporary Cultures PS 225: Politics in Comparative Perspective PS 203: International Relations ECO 315: Comparative Economic and Political Systems SOC 345: Gender in Global Society GS 410: Global Studies Advanced Seminar Study Abroad or Immersion Internship Experience: All Global Studies majors partake in a study abroad experience or an immersion internship experience, GS 355: Internship Area of Specialization: All Global Studies majors also take four additional courses in one of the three below areas of specialization, at least two of which must be at the 300 level and only one of which may be at the 100 level. 1. The Hispanic World SPN 224: Hispanic Cultures SPN 223: Hispanic Literatures SPN 321: Service Learning in Spanish SPN 322: Spanish Translation SPN 320: Hispanic Film Studies SPN 323: Coloniality in the Hispanic World SPN 324: Hispanic Women Writers SPN 325: Hispanic Nation in Narration GS 220: Translation and Global Culture 2. The Francophone World FRN 230: Advanced French Grammar and Composition FRN 260: Literatures and Cultures of the French-Speaking World FRN 360: French Cinema and Society (Advanced Conversation) FRN 341: Francophone Women Writers of Africa/Caribbean in Translation FRN 340: Autobiography and Exile (Subjectivity in Francophone Literature) FRN 342: Reimagining Childhood in the Francophone World GS 220: Translation and Global Culture 3. Cultural Studies DNC 235/335: Feminist Perspectives Through Cultural Choreographies GS 220: Translation and Global Culture GS 210: Explorations in Global Culture FA 226/326: Medieval and Islamic Art FA 238: Women Artists and Women in Art HIS 216: Race Relations in Early North America PHI 120: World Philosophy RLS 108: Religions of the World SOC 242/342: Food, Culture and Society WS 320: Feminist Theory: Visual Culture Minor Core Courses: Global Studies minors take the following three courses. GS 100: Introduction to Global Studies GS 212: Cultural Geography GS 410: Global Studies Advanced Seminar Area of Specialization: Global studies minors take three additional courses in one of the three above areas of specialization, at least one of which must be at the 300 level and only one of which may be at the 100 level. Student Learning Goals Global Studies Global Studies students enhance their global knowledge base, develop crucial skills, and cultivate global perspectives in the following ways: Knowledge: Students will engage in interdisciplinary studies and will demonstrate understanding of complex global events and processes of globalization in relationship to culture, politics, gender studies, sustainability and foreign languages. Political Competency: Students will demonstrate knowledge of global political processes and issues. (W5a) Cultural Literacy: Students will demonstrate knowledge of global culture/s. (W5a) Gender Studies Competency: Students will demonstrate knowledge of gender as a performative cultural construct and historical and present inequities between genders. (W5b) Environmental Literacy: Students will demonstrate knowledge of global and cultural perspectives on environmental problems. (W5a) Foreign Language Competency: Students will gain competency in a language other than English at the intermediate level or above. (W1d) Skills: Students will be able to write, speak, research and think critically about complex global events and processes of globalization. Written Communication Skills: Students will develop writing skills and become effective writers, demonstrating the ability to compose essays that display a clear thesis and sound structure. (W1a/b) Oral Communication Skills: Students will successfully communicate orally, delivering effective oral presentations that demonstrate a clear thesis and sound structure, demonstrating an ability to express their ideas orally in a variety of contexts. (W1c) Research Skills: Students will conduct research, collaboratively or independently, using methods and tools that are appropriate to the variety of disciplines integrated in Global Studies, including the ability to propose an innovative thesis, display information literacy, and effectively integrate and nuance the ideas and theories of others with their own. (W3a/b) Critical Thinking Skills: Students will analyze, synthesize, and interpret texts, images and experiences, demonstrating quantitative literacy, innovation of thought and creation of theoretical or practical solutions to global problems. (W2c) Perspectives: Students will construct a positive approach toward cultural differences and a willingness to engage those differences, including the development of a commitment to diversity, equality, and ethical responsibility. Global Diversity: Students will experience a variety of diverse cultural constructs, fostering an appreciation for “diversity.” (W5a) Global Inequality: Students will develop the ability to situate discriminatory processes in the context of ongoing global issues. (W5b) Global Ethical Responsibility: Students will locate themselves as active members of the global community and recognize the ethical responsibilities that derive from their particular social locations. (W4b) [-]

BA

Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

A degree in philosophy from Wilson College will equip students with the logic, ethics and critical thinking skills needed to pursue professional careers in law, government, business, science and more. [+]

Exploring reality and the world as we know it From Aristotle to Kant, and everywhere in between, the search for knowledge about our world, reality and the overall human experience has gone on for thousands of years. A degree in philosophy from Wilson College will equip students with the logic, ethics and critical thinking skills needed to pursue professional careers in law, government, business, science and more. Philosophy students will consider such issues as how to lead a fulfilling life, the rights of animals and nature, and the limits of human freedom and knowledge. Easily coupled with a primary major in another field such as religious studies, sociology or literature, the philosophy major provides an open environment for dialogue surrounding the figures and texts that have shaped human thought through time. Philosophy course tracks Philosophy major Philosophy minor Interdisciplinary minor in ethics (religious studies/philosophy) Featured Course Love and Friendship: What's the difference between romance and friendship? How do we understand the tensions between loving particular others, such as our family members, and the moral demand to love all others as we love ourselves? Join Professor John Elia for this Summer I Online course where you'll become familiar with competing accounts of love and friendship, and analyze cultural expressions of love and friendship in the arts, sciences and media. Course Requirements PHI 120: World Philosophy or PHI 121: Ethics PHI 222: Logic PHI 224: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy PHI 225: Modern Philosophy PHI 240: Feminist Philosophy Three additional 200- or 300-level courses in philosophy, at least two at the 300 level. PHI 415 Advanced Seminar Student Learning Goals Area A Goal: Contents of the Discipline Student displays understanding of a philosophical tradition or religion (W6) Student displays understanding of historical development within a philosophical tradition or religion (W6) Student displays understanding of philosophical or religious figures (W6) Student displays awareness of current state of the discipline (W6) Student displays awareness of sub-fields within the discipline (W6) Student displays understanding of the literature in her area of interest (W6) Area B Goal: Analysis and Interpretation Student reads texts critically (W2) Student identifies and restates arguments accurately (W2) Student situates texts in their socio-historical contexts (W2) Student displays familiarity with various methodologies within the discipline (W2, W3) Student engages scholarship within the discipline (W6) Student displays creativity in analysis and in argumentation (W2) Area C Goal: Presentation of Findings/Argument Student states and defends theses persuasively (W1, W2) Student presents ideas clearly (W1, W2) Student effectively employs evidence or reasons (W1, W2) Student displays informational literacy (W3) Student displays recognition of audience (W1) Area D Goal: Synthesis Student draws on the work of others to engage in constructive thinking (W2, W7) Student compares and contrasts critical issues across works of philosophy or religion (W2, W7) Student thinks about the discipline in relation to the larger context (W2, W7) [-]