University of Redlands

Introduction

Where your dreams become aspirations and your aspirations become achievements—that is the Redlands experience.

Since our founding in 1907, we haven’t wavered from our promise: a transformative education in an environment of academic rigor and personal responsibility, where you can blend what you learn in the classroom with life skills that will help you affect positive change in the world.

We are Redlands, where curiosity finds inspiration; where selflessness becomes service; where small classes encourage debate and debate sparks insight; where creativity and innovation open doors and change lives; and where diversity enriches us all.

We are Redlands, where we care more about who you will become than who you used to be; where we take good students and turn them into great people.

Mission Statement

The University of Redlands is a private, independent liberal arts university committed to providing a personalized education that frees students to make enlightened choices.

Redlands emphasizes academic rigor, curricular diversity and innovative teaching. Redlands fosters a community of scholars and encourages a pluralistic notion of values by challenging assumptions and stereotypes in both classes and activities. A Redlands education goes beyond training to embrace a reflective understanding of our world; it proceeds from information to insight, from knowledge to meaning.

Welcoming intellectually curious students of diverse religious, ethnic, national and socioeconomic backgrounds, the University seeks to develop responsible citizenship as part of a complete education. Redlands encourages a community atmosphere with exceptional opportunity for student leadership and interaction. For working adults, the University offers innovative academic programs at convenient locations and times.

Redlands blends liberal arts and professional programs, applied and theoretical study, traditional majors and self-designed contracts for graduation. Small classes enable each student to participate in class discussion, to work closely with professors, and to receive extensive individual attention. Redlands remains sensitive to contemporary trends in society and challenges students to commit themselves to a lifetime of learning.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Bachelor

Bachelor in Engineering (Combined Degree)

Campus Full time September 2017 USA New York

In engineering, you put the laws of nature to use—building a smarter phone, a lighter jet, a longer-lived battery, or even a more efficient company. The study of engineering begins with a foundation in mathematics and the natural sciences. Through the University of Redlands, you can lay that foundation while enjoying the small classes, personalized education, and diverse opportunities that Redlands is known for and developing... [+]

Bachelor in Engineering (Combined Degree) In engineering, you put the laws of nature to use—building a smarter phone, a lighter jet, a longer-lived battery, or even a more efficient company. The study of engineering begins with a foundation in mathematics and the natural sciences. Through the University of Redlands, you can lay that foundation while enjoying the small classes, personalized education, and diverse opportunities that Redlands is known for and developing the breadth of liberal arts knowledge and skills that are essential for a rewarding life and a successful career. Either you can pursue a master's in engineering after earning a bachelor's degree in one of the sciences, or you can expedite your education by participating in one of our engineering combined-degree programs. A strong student can complete a Redlands major and general education requirements while taking pre-engineering courses, all in three years. The program adviser can help you plan your schedule accordingly. Provided that you maintained high grades in the pre-engineering courses, you’d enroll at Columbia or Washington University’s School of Engineering for the next two years (financial aid and housing are arranged through Columbia or Washington). At the end of the five years, you’d graduate with degrees from both institutions. You are free to pair any University of Redlands undergraduate major with any engineering major; however, the pre-engineering requirements for most sub-fields are most compatible with the physics B.A. or individualized Johnston emphases. See the full list of requirements for the various engineering majors at Columbia University and Washington University. Advice to Incoming Students Interested in Engineering If you’re an entering student who’s interested in the engineering combined-degree plan, it is important that you take or place out of General Physics I and Calculus I your first semester, get at least a B (3.0) in them, and contact the program director, Eric Hill, prior to Spring registration so he can work with you to identify appropriate courses. Please note that General Physics I is offered during only the FALL semester, so a student would have to wait an entire year for it to be offered again. Also, only one section is offered (MWF 11-12:20 plus a choice of lab times). If this conflicts with your current First Year Seminar, your advisor and the program director, Eric Hill, can work with you to determine whether changing seminars would be recommended. If it is full at time of registration, contact the program director and we will do our best to accommodate all qualified students. Calculus I is a co-requisite for General Physics I, but we strongly encourage you to enroll in the highest calculus course for which you are qualified since Calculus II and III are core pre-engineering courses (and required for General Physics II and III which are also core pre-engineering courses.) If you place into Integrated Calculus I (MATH 118) or lower, you should contact the program director to discuss options; the soonest you could take General Physics I and II would be next year (or you may take comparable summer courses.) Suggested first-year courses for students interested in engineering: Fall First-year seminar General Physics I (PHYS 231) AND lab (PHYS231L) Highest possible Calculus class (at least MATH 121) LAF* Spring General Physics II (PHYS 232) AND lab Highest possible Calculus class (at least MATH 122) LAF LAF An alternative path into engineering (outside of the combined-degree plan) is earning a strong science degree and then pursuing an MS in engineering. The courses required for the combined-degree plan are still highly recommended for this option; the program director can help you choose appropriate courses for this option. *If you’re interested in Chemical or Biomedical Engineering, you should take General Chemistry I (CHEM 131 and 131L) your first semester; otherwise, this may be postponed a year or two. Why participate in a combined-degree program rather than going straight for an engineering bachelors? Few small schools can afford to have strong engineering departments of their own, and few large schools can offer the personalized education that a small school can. So a combined-degree program allows you to go to a small school for three years, take your introductory math and science courses in classes of 20 to 40 instead of 200 to 400, learn from professors rather than graduate students, and develop the ‘soft’ skills that a liberal arts education is known for but are actually invaluable to scientists and engineers. But it also allows you to spend two years at a high-caliber school of engineering. [-]

Bachelor in English

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

The English Department fosters students’ love of literature through rigorous examination of texts, challenging discussion, thoughtful writing and training in different theoretical approaches. Students explore the works of important writers in multiple genres from many countries and time periods, as well as the ideas, cultural values and debates literature presents, supported by a faculty with diverse interdisciplinary interests... [+]

Bachelor in English The English Department fosters students’ love of literature through rigorous examination of texts, challenging discussion, thoughtful writing and training in different theoretical approaches. Students explore the works of important writers in multiple genres from many countries and time periods, as well as the ideas, cultural values and debates literature presents, supported by a faculty with diverse interdisciplinary interests. The skills practiced in our curriculum foster a deeper understanding of the English language, independent thought and critical acumen, all of which prepare students for such varied careers as advertising, creative writing, law, journalism, public relations, publishing and teaching. The Major The required courses are designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to linguistic nuance and power, and an ability to communicate persuasively. Requirements: Minimum of 11 courses There are four core courses required for the English major, two taken at the sophomore level, two at the senior: ENGL 201 Critical Reading ENGL 202 Texts and Contexts ENGL 402 Literary Criticism OR ENGL 403 Current Literary Theory ENGL 420 Senior Seminar in Literature In addition to these four courses, majors will choose (in consultation with their advisors) seven courses from department offerings that will broaden and deepen their literary studies. At least one course from these seven should be devoted to literature prior to 1800, and at least four of them must be at the 300 level or above. The Minor This minor is designed for the student who wishes to read, discuss, and enjoy novels, plays, stories, poetry, and literary theory as part of a broad liberal education. The minor in literature consists of a minimum of 24 credits: ENGL 201 or ENGL 202, plus one additional 200 level course Four courses in literature numbered 300 or above. Please consult with a departmental advisor or the department chair in choosing these classes. [-]

Bachelor in Global Business

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

The nationally recognized major in Global Business prepares students for a career in international business, public and not-for-profit service, as well as graduate study in a number of disciplines including law, finance, business and government. The University's language programs in Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Japanese and Spanish support this program. Global Business is presented as a process of understanding how... [+]

Bachelor in Global Business The nationally recognized major in Global Business prepares students for a career in international business, public and not-for-profit service, as well as graduate study in a number of disciplines including law, finance, business and government. The University's language programs in Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Japanese and Spanish support this program. Global Business is presented as a process of understanding how cultures and political systems manage their economics, and the rules and procedures that nations create to permit and encourage businesses to operate within their borders. To understand foreign business situations, an emphasis is placed on developing knowledge of and sensitivity to both the cultural and political climates of host countries. Students completing the Global Business major will gain an understanding of: Issues facing organizations operating beyond their domestic borders Problems and opportunities faced by developing nations as they attempt to grow their economies Selected major trading relationships of the United States (China, Mexico, Japan, the EU); the major trading blocs (e.g., NAFTA, the European Union, MERCOSUR, etc.); the major U.S. and world agencies that support global trade, development, and investment; and the positive and negative impacts that all these entities have on national cultures, standards of living, civil liberties, and business in general Students are encouraged to develop a geographic area of emphasis or concentration through interdisciplinary study. Linked to the academic study of issues and practices are the requirements that students become proficient in a second language and that they study abroad. Approval from either the Global Business Hunsaker Chair, or the Business Department Chair, is required for all interdisciplinary and overseas-study aspects of the degree. Requirements 1 - Prerequisite Courses ECON 250 Principles of Microeconomics ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics BUS 226 The Rise of American Capitalism 1860-1932 BUS 240 or ACCT 240 Business Law ECON 200, MATH 111, or another approved statistics course MATH 121 Calculus I ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting ACCT 220 Principles of Managerial Accounting 2 - Core Courses BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior BUS 336 International Business BUS 340 Global Marketing BUS 353 Managerial Finance or ACCT 315 Advanced Managerial Accounting BUS 457 Strategic Issues in Global Business BUS 459 Business Policy and Strategy Two additional 400 series Advanced International Business courses (includes possible study abroad courses) 3 - Other Requirements At least three international courses selected from one or more of the following areas: Economics, Environmental Studies, History, Government, Art, Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, Psychology, International Relations, Sociology and Anthropology, or Religion at the 300 level or above. The department is open to international courses from other disciplines, subject to relevance. Minimum of one semester abroad, with additional study abroad recommended and supported by the department. Language proficiency: Testing placement at the entry point to the 400-level of a foreign language by graduation. All students must take at least 8 credits of a foreign language. Students who are already proficient may take the required 8 credits either in the language in which they are proficient or in another language. The expectation of the major is that students will take at least 8 credits of language relevant to their area of concentration. Program Learning Outcomes Demonstrate competency through the 302-level in written and verbal communication in a second language. Identify and understand the challenges and opportunities of operating a business or non-governmental organization in international settings. Utilize critical thinking to produce sound strategic decisions by identifying, comparing, and contrasting how foreign and domestic businesses formulate strategies and operate globally. Develop a capacity to meaningfully evaluate a company (or non-profit) performance with the application of appropriate financial and statistical techniques as well as accounting methods. Demonstrate an interdisciplinary knowledge of at least one other area of the world outside of the United States. Develop a critical understanding of the foundations and varieties of capitalism around the world and understand their impact on current business practices. Utilize verbal communication skills to engage an audience with a coherent, persuasive research presentation. Accurately apply written communication skills to produce in-depth written analyses of course readings and/or cases. Accurately assess the global operations and challenges of an individually assigned, internationally active, major company during a semester-long analysis, in order to provide intelligent, informed recommendations to strategic dilemmas. [-]

Bachelor in International Relations

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

The major consists of a minimum of 48 credits selected in consultation with one of the program committee members or a faculty member in one of the departments that contribute to the international relations major. No more than 50 percent of the required units for any particular component of the international relations major (i.e., political science, economics, history) can be satisfied through off-campus programs. Credits... [+]

Bachelor in International Relations The major consists of a minimum of 48 credits selected in consultation with one of the program committee members or a faculty member in one of the departments that contribute to the international relations major. No more than 50 percent of the required units for any particular component of the international relations major (i.e., political science, economics, history) can be satisfied through off-campus programs. Credits earned by international relations majors through the Washington Semester program are subject to this limitation. Majors are required to complete the equivalent of a fourth semester of a foreign language at the college level. Participation in an off-campus study program is strongly encouraged and usually can be scheduled for the junior or senior year. Students who wish to pursue a minor in economics, history, or foreign language should contact the program director. Because Political Science courses are an integral part of the international relations major, students are not permitted to major in both political science and international relations. The Major The major consists of a minimum of 48 units selected in consultation with an advisor, who must be a member of the Advisory Committee. In addition to completing the foundation, foreign language, and capstone requirements, every major will select a concentration from the list below and complete 24 units from the list of acceptable courses. The list of courses for each concentration will be revised each year to accommodate newly approved courses and appropriate topics courses. This list may be acquired from the program director. At least 28 units for the major must be taken at the University of Redlands. No more than fifty percent of the units for the foundation or concentration requirement may be satisfied through off-campus study; determination of course equivalence for offcampus study programs is the province of the student’s academic adviser. The foreign language requirement may be acquired though off-campus programs. The capstone course must be taken at the University of Redlands. Participation in a study abroad program is strongly encouraged and should usually be scheduled for the junior or senior year. Major Requirements Students must complete 48 units, distributed as follows: 1 - Foundation (16 units): Complete all four courses listed. IR 200 International Relations Theory HIST 102 World History since 1450 SOAN 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ECON 149 Introduction to Economics OR ECON 250 Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 149 does not meet the prerequisites for the upper-division economics courses recommended for some concentrations. Students considering these courses should take ECON 250 and 251.) 2 - Capstone (4 units): IR 400 International Relations Capstone. 3 - Foreign Language (4 units): Pass at least one course at or above the 300 level or equivalent. 4 - Concentration (24 units): Select one concentration area and complete the requirements. Choose six courses from the list provided for the concentration; no more than two may have 100 or 200 level designations. One class must be a methods course, but no more than two methods courses may count toward the six courses required by the concentration. Courses in the concentration must be taken from at least three departments. One course in the concentration must be at the 400 level. Eligible classes will change as course offerings change. Program Learning Outcomes Graduates of the International Relations Major will: Describe the dominant theoretical approaches to international relations. Use their knowledge of the dominant theoretical approaches to international relations to interpret the behavior of international actors. Select methods of analysis appropriate to research in the student’s chosen concentration, and apply at least one of these methods to a research question in international relations. Integrate multiple disciplinary approaches to the study of international relations. Write grammatically correct and logically organized essays and papers. Communicate in a language other than English at an Intermediate-Mid level of proficiency (as defined in ACTFL guidelines) in speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension. [-]

Bachelor in Music

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

In the School of Music our goal is to educate the whole musician, not just to train a performer. All great performances go far beyond technical mastery to include a sense of history, society, culture and art. Through a conservatory approach in a liberal arts setting, our students learn to perform, interpret and teach music in a rich learning environment that provides a broad education and intense training. Our studio teachers are... [+]

Bachelor in Music In the School of Music our goal is to educate the whole musician, not just to train a performer. All great performances go far beyond technical mastery to include a sense of history, society, culture and art. Through a conservatory approach in a liberal arts setting, our students learn to perform, interpret and teach music in a rich learning environment that provides a broad education and intense training. Our studio teachers are among the finest musicians and teachers in Southern California. The classes are small and your teachers will know you as a person, not just as a name on a class roster. Whether music is your major or you just have an interest in music, everyone is encouraged to participate in the diverse, musical environment found on campus. At Redlands you can perform in: Wind Ensemble Symphonic Band University Orchestra University Choir Bel Canto Chapel Singers Opera Workshop Studio Big Band Percussion Ensemble Guitar Ensembles Jazz Improvisation Ensemble A variety of academic scholarships are available at the University of Redlands. In addition, the School of Music offers music scholarships for those majoring or minoring in music. The office of Student Financial Services offers financial assistance to more than 80 percent of the student body. Assistance can be in the form of grants, loans and work-study. Bachelor of Arts - Bachelor of Music Performance Composition Music Education Music Admissions In the School of Music our goal is to educate the whole musician, not just to train a performer. All great performances go far beyond technical mastery to include a sense of history, society, culture and art. Through a conservatory approach in a liberal arts setting, our students learn to perform, interpret and teach music in a rich learning environment that provides a broad education and intense training. Our studio teachers are among the finest musicians and teachers in Southern California. The classes are small and your teachers will know you as a person, not just as a name on a class roster. Whether music is your major or you just have an interest in music, everyone is encouraged to participate in the diverse, musical environment found on campus. At Redlands you can perform in the Wind Ensemble, Orchestra, University Choir, the Madrigal Singers, Chapel Singers, Jazz Ensemble, Jazz Combo, Percussion Ensemble and Opera Theater Workshop. Performance opportunities abound with more than 200 performances presented on campus annually, including the University's holiday tradition, the Feast of Lights. The School of Music offers two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Music in Performance, Composition or Music Education and the Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music, as well as a minor in music. The School of Music also offers a Master's degree in: Performance, Music Education, Conducting and Composition, as well as an Artist Diploma. The University of Redlands School of Music is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. You are encouraged to visit campus, observe a class, have a sample lesson and/or sit in on a rehearsal. Come and see what we do! [-]

Bachelor in Psychology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

Psychology is one of the most important human sciences. It allows us to understand who we are and how our mind works. As a psychology major at Redlands, you will... [+]

Bachelor in Psychology Psychology is one of the most important human sciences. It allows us to understand who we are and how our mind works. As a psychology major at Redlands, you will: Come to understand the processes of behavior, both in yourself and others Gain a general knowledge of why people think, act, and feel the way they do Learn to think critically and solve problems Develop your analytic, communications and interpersonal and intrapersonal skills Explore developmental, biological, cognitive and social contributions to human activity, both normal and abnormal With a degree in psychology from Redlands, you can strengthen relationships, improve your leadership skills, make more accurate decisions, gain a better understanding of yourself and be successful in your career. The Major Majors must complete a senior capstone and a minimum of 10 courses in psychology, seven of which must be in residence. Students are required to complete the following courses: PSYC 100, PSYC 250, and PSYC 300. Students can declare the major after completion of PSYC 100 (with a minimum grade of 2.7), PSYC 250 (with a minimum grade of 2.0), and one additional psychology course with a combined 2.3 GPA across their Psychology courses. Transfer students are expected to meet the same prerequisites and GPA standards as students in residence. We strongly advise students to complete all their courses no later than their junior year. PSYC 100 should ideally be taken in the first year, followed by PSYC 250 and PSYC 300 by the end of year three. All prerequisite courses must be taken for a numerical grade. Students must earn a minimum grade of 2.7 in PSYC 100 for it to serve as a prerequisite for other PSYC courses. Students must also earn a minimum grade of 2.0 in PSYC 250 and PSYC 300 for these courses to serve as prerequisites for upper level courses. Majors must also complete a minimum of three courses from each of the following categories: 1. Intermediate courses—PSYC 210, PSYC 220, PSYC 260, PSYC 262, PSYC 320, PSYC 335, PSYC 343, PSYC 344, PSYC 349, PSYC 350, PSYC 352, PSYC 355, PSYC 360. 2. Advanced Courses— PSYC 435, PSYC 439, PSYC 440, PSYC 441, PSYC 445, PSYC 447, PSYC 448, PSYC 460. These courses generally have an empirical component involving data collection, analysis, interpretation, and a written report. 3. Students may select the tenth course from any 3 to 4 unit course in psychology. In addition to these 10 courses, students must complete at least one semester of PSYC 473 or PSYC 487 or a research project in the form of a directed study at the senior level, or honors. Students planning to study abroad should contact their advisor early to coordinate this experience with the major program sequence. The department supports and encourages cross-cultural studies. The Minor The minor in psychology consists of a minimum of six courses, four of which should be in residence. It is recommended that students take PSYC 100 first, as it is a prerequisite for most psychology classes. PSYC 250 and 300 are not required for the minor, however, they are prerequisites for all 400-level courses. Departmental Honors Departmental honors in Psychology is available for exceptionally able and motivated students. Receipt of honors requires the completion of a major scholarly project (i.e., largely independent under the supervision of faculty), representing a culmination of scholarly activity within the major. Honors may be awarded to students who declare themselves in their junior year, are approved by department faculty as candidates, and who successfully complete an honors project judged to be outstanding by the student's honors committee. [-]

BBA

Bachelor in Accounting

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

The Redlands Accounting program differs from programs in many business schools because we believe that a rigorous, liberal arts education is the most effective foundation for a career in professional accounting. While our students do acquire the specific business and accounting knowledge necessary to pass professional examinations and join the accounting profession, we are most proud of the development of their intellectual... [+]

Bachelor in Accounting The Redlands Accounting program differs from programs in many business schools because we believe that a rigorous, liberal arts education is the most effective foundation for a career in professional accounting. While our students do acquire the specific business and accounting knowledge necessary to pass professional examinations and join the accounting profession, we are most proud of the development of their intellectual and analytical capabilities, interpersonal and communication skills and their commitments to integrity, self-motivation and lifelong learning. Students work very closely with the faculty, all of whom have extensive professional experience in large and small CPA firms and corporations to add to their academic backgrounds. Small classes, many with less than 20, mean that all students are active participants at every class meeting. Students frequently meet with professors outside of class to discuss concepts, for help with resumes or interview skills, to identify and apply for internships and to plan their careers. Each student will have one-on-one study experiences as they complete at least one independent study, capstone or honors project. Most accounting majors are involved in extracurricular activities such as sports, clubs or part-time internships during the school year. Some of these will likely have a strongly topical focus. The Redlands Accounting Society, to which all majors belong, brings in a dozen or more speakers each year. The Redlands Student Investment Fund, open to all students, manages a portion of the University’s endowment, presenting and making decisions about potential investments. Some students prepare tax returns for local residents through our VITA program; others advance financial literacy in the community. Students are encouraged to plan ahead so they can study abroad for a semester. Accounting is a demanding major. Many of our graduates complete 150 college units and pass the CPA exam, a challenging, multi-part nationwide exam, shortly after graduation, and go on to obtain the professional experience necessary to become certified public accountants. Others acquire professional certifications such as the CIA or CMA. To meet these goals, students must be dedicated to mastering a vast and ever-changing set of professional standards, at the same time as they develop core intellectual, interpersonal and moral capabilities. The Major The accounting major provides an opportunity to extend academic skills developed in the Liberal Arts Foundation to prepare for a specific professional career. Accounting coursework emphasizes critical analysis, problem-solving, reasoning and communication. Internet research, writing and presentation skills are developed across the program. The accounting major covers financial accounting for external reports, managerial accounting for internal decisions, auditing for assurance services and tax for regulatory accounting. Completion of the accounting major lays the foundation for obtaining professional designations such as Certified Public Accountant and Certified Management Accountant. In addition to preparing students for entry into the accounting profession, the accounting major also provides a foundation for pursuing careers in finance, investments, management, FBI and the law. Accounting is presented as a process of developing and reporting economic and financial information for a wide range of business, not-for-profit and government entities. The usefulness of accounting information is illustrated and its interpretation is stressed. Accounting coursework usually begins in the sophomore year but anticipates completion of several introductory related field courses. Students considering an accounting major should consult an accounting faculty member early in their Redlands careers because completion of the major requires careful planning, especially if a student plans a semester abroad. The optimal time for a semester abroad is during the sophomore year. Potential transfer students should contact an accounting faculty member as special planning might be necessary. The Minor A minor in accounting can provide a foundation for careers in general business, investment management and finance. Students who choose to minor in accounting must complete the following accounting courses: ACCT 210, 211, 220, 310, 315 and one additional accounting course at the 300 or 400 level. Bachelor of Science Requirements Program classes may be taken toward the major upon completion of introductory field courses with a 2.0 or higher G.P.A. in each course. Students entering the major are expected to have a 2.7 or higher cumulative G.P.A. on a 4.0 scale. Transfer students are expected to have a 2.7 average from their previous school(s). A 2.0 in each prerequisite course also is required. Course substitutions, if granted, require written approval from the program director. Introductory Related Field Courses Note that these courses satisfy Liberal Arts Foundation requirements. ECON 250 Principles of Microeconomics (SE) ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics (SE) MATH 121 Calculus I (MS2) Note: MATH 121 is not required but is expected by high-quality graduate programs in accounting and business PSYC 100, SOAN 100 or SOAN 102 recommended to fulfill HB requirement Advanced Related Field Requirements ECON 200, MATH 111 or another approved statistics course BUS 421 Investments or BUS 420 Corporate Finance ECON 350 Intermediate Microeconomics or another individually approved advanced economics course. Additional advanced economics courses are strongly recommended. Accounting Courses ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting and Reporting ACCT 211 Financial Accounting Process ACCT 220 Principles of Managerial Accounting ACCT 240 Business Law ACCT 310–320 Intermediate Accounting I, II ACCT 315 Advanced Managerial Accounting ACCT 400–401 Financial Reporting Theory I, II ACCT 410 Auditing ACCT 411 Accounting Information Systems ACCT 415 Tax Accounting ACCT 421 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting ACCT 440 Financial and Business Reporting Analysis [-]

Bachelor in Business Administration

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Redlands

This program provides students with a comprehensive view of the inner workings of corporate, non-profit, and governmental organizations, as well as the complex legal and strategic environments in which organizations function. Students enrich core study in organizational operations through the selection of advanced electives... [+]

Bachelor in Business Administration More than one million college graduates prepare to enter the American workforce each year and employers' expectations are very high. Redlands gives you the competitive edge to gain great employment opportunities on graduation. To prepare you for a career in business, at Redlands you will: Have the opportunity to take on field research at corporations and government agencies, participate in both domestic and international business and government internships at home and abroad Study under professors who have significant professional experience in business and government Engage with visiting executives from the world's leading corporations Develop your leadership skills and successfully build competencies in critical thinking, analysis and decision making Gain a national and international business perspective through practical hands-on learning opportunities conducting case studies with companies, and visiting major and niche corporations throughout Southern California and the world As a Redlands business graduate, you will become an active participant in the growing global economy and be prepared to compete for a fast-track career placement with our nation's leading corporations. This program provides students with a comprehensive view of the inner workings of corporate, non-profit, and governmental organizations, as well as the complex legal and strategic environments in which organizations function. Students enrich core study in organizational operations through the selection of advanced electives. The bachelor of science helps prepare students for decision making and leadership roles in business and public service. Students with the bachelor of science degree pursue graduate study in business, healthcare, sports management, human resources, and law, among others. REQUIREMENTS Prerequisite Courses The following courses are prerequisites to the required major courses. Some also satisfy Liberal Arts Foundation requirements. ECON 250 Principles of Microeconomics ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics ECON 200, MATH 111, or another approved statistics course ACCT 210 Principles of Financial Accounting and Reporting ACCT 220 Principles of Managerial Accounting BUS 226 The Rise of American Capitalism 1860-1932 BUS 240 or ACCT 240 Business Law Core Courses BUS 131 Principles of Marketing BUS 310 Principles of Management and Organization Behavior BUS 336 International Business or another approved international course BUS 353 Managerial Finance BUS 442 or BUS 444 or a business ethics course (select one) BUS 430 Human Resource Management or BUS 369 Workplace Regulation BUS 459 Business Policy and Strategy Advanced Elective Courses Three approved advanced elective courses, two of which may be outside the major but must have relevance thereto, with signed adviser approval. [-]

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Contact

University of Redlands

Address East Colton Avenue 1200
Redlands 92373, United States
Website http://www.redlands.edu/
Phone +1 909-793-2121