Simpson College

Introduction

About Simpson

Founded in 1860, Simpson has prepared generations of students for successful careers, graduate schools or service work. Our beautiful campus sits on 75 acres in Indianola, Iowa and offers the best of both worlds: a nurturing academic environment that’s close to the career, internship and entertainment options available in Iowa’s capital city.

Most of our professors hold the highest degrees in their field, and they are committed to helping the more than 1,400 students achieve their dreams. Student life is exciting and fulfilling, with dozens of opportunities for students to participate, in everything from Greek life to intercollegiate and intramural sports. Simpson’s success in promoting quality programs and providing exceptional value have been recognized nationally by Peterson’s Competitive Colleges and U.S. News. This is a great college, and the more that people learn about Simpson, the more impressed they become. We invite you to visit and take a closer look.

Quick Facts

Founded

In 1860, Simpson College was founded by members of the Iowa United Methodist Church.

Accreditation

Simpson College has been fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association since 1913.

Locations

Indianola, Iowa, a community of 13,000 people located 12 miles south of Des Moines, which is Iowa’s thriving capital city. Simpson also has campuses in West Des Moines and Ankeny.

Main Campus

Eighty-five acres comprise Simpson’s main campus in Indianola with 34 major buildings, including: College Hall, Wallace Hall, Mary Berry Hall, George Washington Carver Science Center, Dunn Library, Kent Campus Center, Smith Memorial Chapel, Blank Performing Arts Center, Athletic Complex, Amy Robertson Music Center and Henry H. and Thomas H. McNeill Hall.

Character

Simpson College is a United Methodist related, independent, undergraduate, coeducational, liberal-arts college.

Academic Year

Two four-month semesters and one three-week term in May, which allows for specialized study on or off campus, makes up the academic year.

Number of Faculty

The faculty to student ratio is one professor for every 13 students with 86 percent of the 95-member, full-time faculty having earned the highest degree in their fields.

Number of Students

The student body is made up of 1,400 full-time students and 300 part-time students.

Admission

Application form, high school transcripts, ACT or SAT scores and recommendation from principal or guidance counselor are considered in acceptance process.

Costs

Costs for the 2016-17 academic year are as follows: tuition and fees $35,876; standard room costs $3,860; standard board charges $4,103.

Majors, Minors & Programs

Simpson offers 80 majors, minors and programs.

Extracurricular Organizations

Eighty-four percent of students are involved in student government, newspaper, radio, intercollegiate and intramural sports, Greek life, departmental activities, honor and professional groups, music, drama, religion and other interest groups.

Intercollegiate Sports

Men: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, tennis, track & field, wrestling; Women: basketball, cross country, golf, softball, soccer, swimming, tennis, track & field, volleyball

*Recent Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Champion (since 1987).

Honors and Professional Societies

Alpha Lambda Delta; Alpha Sigma Lambda; Beta Beta Beta; Epsilon Sigma; Mu Phi Epsilon; Omicron Delta Kappa; Phi Alpha Theta; Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia; Student Education Association.

Greek Organizations

Fraternities: Alpha Tau Omega, Kappa Theta Psi, Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sororities: Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Lambda Gamma

Distinctive Facts

Simpson is recognized for its quality programs and value by Peterson’s Competitive Colleges and by U.S. News and World Report. In addition, Simpson ranks among the nation’s top 100 colleges in percentage of students who study abroad, according to U.S. News and World Report. Simpson is also the summer home of internationally recognized Des Moines Metro Opera. Noted scientist George Washington Carver began his college career at Simpson in 1890.

Head Administrators

Chair, Board of Trustees: Sunnie Richer President: Jay Simmons President’s Cabinet

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Bachelor

Bachelor in International Relations

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

Want to get inside the minds of world leaders and learn from their decisions? If you are interested in global issues and diplomacy, then International Relations (IR) is the perfect major for you! In IR, you’ll learn about Latin American politics, Asian history, world religions, and much more. Then test your diplomacy skills as you compete with students from other colleges at the Model U.N. Conference. [+]

Want to get inside the minds of world leaders and learn from their decisions? If you are interested in global issues and diplomacy, then International Relations (IR) is the perfect major for you! In IR, you’ll learn about Latin American politics, Asian history, world religions, and much more. Then test your diplomacy skills as you compete with students from other colleges at the Model U.N. Conference. What are the required courses for an International Relations major? PoSc 130 Model United Nations (SUGGESTED, not required) PoSc 240 World Politics PoSc 340 Politics of a Changing World PoSc 385 Senior Seminar Three of the following: (at least two from Political Science) PoSc 230 West European Politics PoSc 231 Politics of Russia and Eastern Europe PoSc 232 Asian Politics PoSc 233 Latin American Politics Span 213 Latin American Culture and Civilization* Hist 309 Contemporary Europe Hist 275 History of India Hist 276 History of China Three of the following: Anth 110 Cultural Anthropology Art 204 Survey of Non-Western Art Econ 230 Economic Development** PoSc 245 Global Issues Rel 120 Intro to World Religions Rel 233 Islam Rel 263 Ethics, Religion and Conflict One semester of a World Language above the 102 level With permission of the department, participation in the Drew University Semester or the CHIP semester in Washington DC may substitute for some requirements. *Prerequisite for Spanish 213 is Spanish 202 or equivalent. **Prerequisite for Economics 230 is Economics 101 or 102. [-]

Bachelor in Multimedia Journalism

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

A degree in multimedia journalism means our students master the art of traditional writing, editing and reporting skills, plus learn how to create podcasts, video and audio productions along with website content. It’s our innovative approach to journalism that keeps our successful Simpson students current with the fast pace of new media. [+]

Top reasons why you should join us: 3 publications offer opportunities for involvement: The Simpsonian newspaper, KSTM radio, ID Magazine Guaranteed internships mean that all students graduate with professional experience ready to start their careers with success. Faculty with professional experience guide your studies and help you develop your path to achieve your goals. All students receive individual advising for coursework and job/internship search. Simpson's strategic location just outside of Des Moines offers internship, job shadow and career opportunities at major broadcast affiliates, newspapers, and magazines. 100% of our Spring 2012 survey respondents affirmed their full-time employment (89% response rate). We admit it. Keeping up with the pace of the ever-changing communications channels and how best to use them is a challenge. Our communications faculty members have proven they are up for the challenge and work hard to keep you on the cutting edge of new, exciting communications mediums. A degree in multimedia journalism means our students master the art of traditional writing, editing and reporting skills, plus learn how to create podcasts, video and audio productions along with website content. It’s our innovative approach to journalism that keeps our successful Simpson students current with the fast pace of new media. Multimedia Journalism Major Students will complete ten courses plus internship as follows: Required: Comm 101 Introduction to Communication & Media Studies Comm 211 Beginning Newswriting & Reporting Comm 220 Mass Communication & Society OR Comm 275 Gender, Race, Class & Media Comm 221 Video Production OR Comm 271 Audio Production Comm 301 Media Law & Ethics Comm 311 Editing & Design Comm 315 Journalism 2.0 Comm 351 History of Media Technologies in America Comm 361 Seminar in Multimedia Journalism Comm 155 Student Media Practicum Comm 319 Internship Multimedia Journalism Minor Students will complete six courses as follows: Required: Comm 101 Introduction to Communication & Media Studies Comm 211 Beginning News-writing & Reporting Comm 220 Mass Communication & Society OR Comm 275 Gender, Race, Class & Media Comm 221 Video News-writing & Production OR Comm 271 Audio Writing & Production Comm 301 Mass Media Law & Ethics Comm 311 Editing & Design [-]

Bachelor in Political Science

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

We like to say "politics is life" at Simpson College. Where else can you find this many leadership opportunities? Simpson's distinctive program includes the Capitol Hill Internship (CHIP) semester in Washington, D.C., the Culver Public Policy Center and Fellowship, a nationally ranked Speech and Debate Team, Model United Nations, Simpson Political Survey, and May term travel to Brazil, Great Britain, and Washington, D.C. [+]

We like to say "politics is life" at Simpson College. Where else can you find this many leadership opportunities? Simpson's distinctive program includes the Capitol Hill Internship (CHIP) semester in Washington, D.C., the Culver Public Policy Center and Fellowship, a nationally ranked Speech and Debate Team, Model United Nations, Simpson Political Survey, and May term travel to Brazil, Great Britain, and Washington, D.C. Full Course Brochure: https://issuu.com/kedronbardwell/docs/polisci_brochure2015 What are the required courses for a Political Science major? PoSc 101 American Government PoSc 240 World Politics PoSc 385 Senior Seminar One course in Comparative Politics: PoSc 230 West European Politics PoSc 231 Politics of Russia and Eastern Europe PoSc 232 Asian Politics PoSc 233 Latin American Politics One course in American Institutions: PoSc 215 American Political Parties and Elections PoSc 250 American Presidency PoSc 315 Supreme Court and the Constitution One course in Public Policy: PoSc 245 Global Issues PoSc 270 American Public Policy PoSc 370 Environmental Politics Poli Sci Electives Choose four Political Science courses. What about a Political Science minor? PoSc 101 American Government PoSc 240 World Politics Political Science electives (3 courses) [-]

Bachelor in Sports Administration

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

The Sports Administration major or minor is designed to serve the interests and occupational opportunities for students pursuing the business side of sport and physical fitness. The Sports Administration major features the use of two internships to provide experiential learning, a vital ingredient in any Sports Management program. [+]

The Sports Administration major or minor is designed to serve the interests and occupational opportunities for students pursuing the business side of sport and physical fitness. The Sports Administration major features the use of two internships to provide experiential learning, a vital ingredient in any Sports Management program. Sports Administration Major Students will complete ten courses plus a capstone as follows: Required: SpSc 214 Recreation and Park Program Mgmt. SpSc 253 Sport and Fitness Management *CT embedded skills SpSc 263 Sports Law *CE area of engagement and WC and IL embedded skills SpSc 273 Sport and Fitness Marketing SpSc 300 Sport Finance SpSc 320 Event and Facility Management Acct 201 Introduction to Accounting *QR embedded skill Comm 223 Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communication *OC embedded skill Econ 100 Principles of Economics SpSc 319 Junior or senior internship Capstone: SpSc 385 Senior Capstone with internship * WC and IL embedded skills Sports Administration Minor Students will complete six courses as follows: Required: SpSc 253 Sport and Fitness Management SpSc 263 Sports Law SpSc 273 Sport and Fitness Marketing SpSc 319 Junior or Senior Internship (on or off campus) SpSc 320 Event and Facility Management Comm 223 Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communications OR Acct 201 Introduction to Accounting Information and Decision Making Typical Four Year Progression: First Year: Econ 100 SpSc 214 (fall only SpSc 253 (spring and summer only) Second Year: SpSc 263 (fall only) SpSc 273 (spring only) Acct 201 Comm 223 *SpSc 290 - Career services workshop series at least one semester prior to completing SpSc 319 internship. If Coop 119 was completed during May term, the student is exempt from taking SpSc 290. Third Year: SpSc 300 (fall only) SpSc 320 (fall only, junior or senior year) SpSc 319 Fourth Year: SpSc 385 [-]

Bachelor of Global Management

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

We offer comprehensive business curriculum with a focus on management. Seniors take part in the management senior seminar and take a global focused slant. The global component is not merely adding study of another language. Students infuse world politics, culture, religion, and history courses into their business studies. [+]

You see the major listed differently at each school (global business, international business, international management), but Simpson's Global Management major has distinctions to set it apart: We offer comprehensive business curriculum with a focus on management. Seniors take part in the management senior seminar and take a global focused slant. The global component is not merely adding study of another language. Students infuse world politics, culture, religion, and history courses into their business studies. Our business professors with international research, teaching and business experience are excited to work with globally focused students. Students take advantage of may term, semester and year-long international study options, international internships and job placements. In our survey of 2012 graduates (100% response rate), all students had found full-time employment. Global Management Major Students will complete ten courses, plus a capstone and a minor in a language as follows: Required: Econ 100 Principles of Economics Acct 201 Introduction to Accounting Magt 131 Management Concepts Mktg 234 Marketing (Pre-req: MAGT 131) Magt 333 Organization and Behavior (Pre-req: MAGT 131 and junior standing) Mktg 336 International Marketing (Pre-req: MAGT 131; MKTG 234; ECON 100 or 101 or 102) Econ 343 International Trade and Finance (Pre-req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102) CIS/MAGT 145 Management Information Systems and Business Intelligence Choose two courses from the following: PoSc 230 Western European Politics PoSc 231 Politics of Russia and Eastern Europe PoSc 232 Asian Politics PoSc 233 Latin American Politics PoSc 240 World Politics PoSc 340 Politics of a Changing World Rel 120 Intro to World Religion Econ 230 Economic Development (Pre-req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102) Hist 275 History of India Hist 276 History of China Hist 309 Contemporary Europe *Also Required: Minor in language offered through the Department of World Language and Culture Studies. Capstone: **Magt 385 Senior Seminar in Strategic Management (Permission from Dept Chair required to enroll. Pre-req: MAGT 131, 333; MKTG 234; ECON 100, 135, 339; ACCT 201) *In fulfilling requirements for the global management major, students who are not native speakers of English are required to pursue a minor in English or another second language. For native speakers of English, study abroad is strongly encouraged. **Consultation with Business Administration and Economics department chair is required during junior year. [-]

BSc

Bachelor in Physics-Engineering

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

It has been said that “Physics is the foundation for engineering”. The Physics-Engineering major at Simpson College therefore provides an especially solid foundation for engineering. With this major you will learn the theoretical underpinnings for all engineering disciplines as well as the design and application of that theory to solve the worlds problems. [+]

It has been said that “Physics is the foundation for engineering”. The Physics-Engineering major at Simpson College therefore provides an especially solid foundation for engineering. With this major you will learn the theoretical underpinnings for all engineering disciplines as well as the design and application of that theory to solve the worlds problems. In addition to laying a solid engineering foundation, starting your engineering career at Simpson College has the advantages of small class size and personal attention, a broad liberal arts base, and more opportunities to explore other campus involvement and athletics. Note: This major is only available to students who transfer to an engineering school after three years as part of the Dual-Degree Program in Engineering. A maximum of 32 credits may be transferred back to Simpson College from the engineering school. (For more information see Dual-Degree Program in Engineering.) Students pursuing the Physics-Engineering Major must complete 14 courses as follows: Required: Phys 191 General Physics I Phys 192 General Physics II Phys 230 Modern Physics Phys 271 Experimental Physics I (.5 course) Phys/Engr 250 Statics OR Phys/Engr 330 Digital Systems Choose one course from the following: Phys 310 Thermal Physics Phys 320 Classical Mechanics Phys 340 Electromagnetic Fields Phys 360 Quantum Mechanics Engineering Electives 300- level or above (2.5 courses) transferred from engineering school Required Supporting Courses: Chem 101 General Chemistry I Chem 102 General Chemistry II* CmSc 150 Fund. Of Computing I Math 151 Calculus I Math 152 Calculus II Math 251 Calculus III Math 345 Differential Equations *Chemistry 102 may be waived if it is not required by the particular engineering school or program the student wishes to enter. In addition to the above required courses, students are urged to consider taking Math 255 Linear Algebra. Students should also be careful to meet any other specific course requirements of their chosen engineering program. Physics-Engineering Capstone The capstone of the physics-engineering major is the successful completion (and transfer back to Simpson College) of 10 hours of engineering courses, 300-level or above, from an accredited engineering school. [-]

Bachelor of Environmental Science

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

This option is designed for students with career interests in education and research (school, colleges, consulting firms), interpretive ecology (regional and national parks, nature preserves, zoos, museums), resource management (agencies and organizations concerned with forest, water, and wildlife resources), public health (state and county agencies), and environmental technology (regulatory agencies, utilities, private industry). [+]

This option is designed for students with career interests in education and research (school, colleges, consulting firms), interpretive ecology (regional and national parks, nature preserves, zoos, museums), resource management (agencies and organizations concerned with forest, water, and wildlife resources), public health (state and county agencies), and environmental technology (regulatory agencies, utilities, private industry). Students will complete ten courses plus a capstone as follows: Required: Core: Biol 103 Environmental Issues w/lab Biol 110 Principles of Biology I w/lab Biol 111 Principles of Biology II w/lab Biol 145 Introductory Plant Biology w/lab Biol 253 Principles of Ecology w/lab Ecological – Organismal Emphasis (Choose at least 2 courses) Biol 245 General Entomology w/lab Biol 251 Microbiology w/lab Biol 275 Behavioral Ecology w/lab Biol 350 Mammalogy w/lab Biol 358 Freshwater Ecology w/lab Biol 390 Special Topics Social, Ethical, Policy, Historical Environmental Sciences (Choose at least one) ** Biol 240 Conservation Law Econ 210 Environmental Economics* Hist 261 American Environmental History Soc 350 Environmental Sociology PoSc 370 Public Policy Topics *Prerequisite of Economics 100 **Appropriate May Term courses, Special Topics courses, or new courses offered by other departments in the future may satisfy this requirement as approved by the department. Chemistry (Choose at least one) Chem 101 Bonds & Structure I w/lab Chem 155 Environmental Chemistry w/lab One Additional Science Class Choose one courses from the following: Math courses above 130 CIS 145 Physics 151 Physics 191 Chemistry 101 Chem 155 NaSc 102 Biol 135 Capstone Biol 372 Capstone Experience In Environmental Science Environmental Science Minor Students will complete five courses as follows: Required: Biol 103 Environmental Issues w/lab Biol 253 Principles of Ecology w/lab Choose one of the following courses: Biol 110 Principles of Biology I w/lab Biol 111 Principles of Biology II w/lab Choose one of the following courses: NaSc 102 Meteorology Biol 145 Introductory Plant Biology w/lab Ecological-Organismal Emphasis (Choose at least one) Biol 245 General Entomology w/lab Biol 251 Microbiology w/lab Biol 275 Behavioral Ecology w/lab Biol 350 Mammalogy w/lab Biol 358 Freshwater Ecology w/lab Biol 290 Special Topics Biol 390 Special Topics Highly Recommended: For graduate school: statistics/calculus [-]

Bachelor of Science in Economics: Finance

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

We’re confident that the strength of our program, combined with the numerous internship opportunities possible in the Des Moines metro area and beyond, provides Simpson finance graduates with bright, successful futures. In fact, in our survey of Spring 2012 economics and economics: finance graduates, 100% of respondants were employed full-time or pursuing graduate studies. (75% survey response rate) [+]

Through study and practice, you will get the experience needed to succeed in graduate school and your professional career. Our current students and alumni will happily tell you: Simpson is the place to be if you are interested in a career in finance. Top reasons why you should join us at Simpson Our major opens doors for you in careers such as banking, finance, insurance or policy analysis, and provides excellent training for advanced studies in MBA or PH.D. programs. The coursework combines rigorous analytical training with practical applications led by dedicated faculty driven to help you succeed. Small class sizes allow our faculty to provide students with personalized attention and mentoring. The capstone course empowers students to combine theory, data collection and statistical techniques to produce high-quality, innovative research. We’re confident that the strength of our program, combined with the numerous internship opportunities possible in the Des Moines metro area and beyond, provides Simpson finance graduates with bright, successful futures. In fact, in our survey of Spring 2012 economics and economics: finance graduates, 100% of respondants were employed full-time or pursuing graduate studies. (75% survey response rate) Economics: Finance Major Students will complete ten and a half courses as follows: Required: Econ 100 Principles of Economics Econ 365 Advanced Microeconomics (Pre-Req: ECON 100 or 102, MATH 151, ECON 135) Econ 366 Advanced Macroeconomics (Pre-Req: ECON 100 or 102, MATH 151) Econ 386 Econometrics (Pre-Req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102, MATH 151, ECON 135) Econ 135 Applied Statistics (Prerequisite: One of: Math 105/105T, Math 130/130T, Math ACT of 22 or higher, or Math SAT of 530 or higher) Math 151 Calculus I (Prerequisite: One of: Math 130/130T, Math ACT of 24 or higher, or Math SAT of 570 or higher) Acct 201 Introduction to Accounting Econ 337 Investments and Securities (Pre-Req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102) Econ 338 Eberhart Student Aid Fund (.5) (Pre-Req: ECON 337) Econ 339 Corporation Finance (Pre-req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102; ACCT 201; ECON 135 Choose one of the following: Econ 343 International Trade and Finance (Pre-req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102) Econ 344 Money and Banking (Pre-req: ECON 100 or 101 or 102; ACCT 201) [-]

Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science / Biochemistry

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Indianola

The biochemistry/forensic science major is intended to prepare students to obtain entry-level jobs in labs performing forensic analyses, go on to graduate work in forensic science, or to provide a good foundation for advanced degree work in areas such as chemistry, biochemistry, forensics, molecular or cell biology, or related technology fields. [+]

The biochemistry/forensic science major is intended to prepare students to obtain entry-level jobs in labs performing forensic analyses, go on to graduate work in forensic science, or to provide a good foundation for advanced degree work in areas such as chemistry, biochemistry, forensics, molecular or cell biology, or related technology fields. In addition to a series of typical biology and chemistry courses, supporting work in math, physics and forensics/criminal justice is required. Transfer students are welcome and may be able to complete many of the required courses before entering this program. Students intending to seek entry level forensic positions after graduation are strongly encouraged to enroll in an internship. Students will complete ten courses plus a capstone as follows: Required Chem 101 General Chemistry I Chem 102 General Chemistry II Chem 201 Organic Chemistry I Biology 111 Principles of Biology II Biology 360 Molecular Genetics Biology 135 Biostatistics Choose one of the following: Chem 307 Instrumental Analysis Chem 205 Quantitative Analysis Electives-Choose three courses from the following: Chem 205 Quantitative Analysis (if not used above) Chem 307 Instrumental Analysis (if not used above) Chem 202 Organic Chemistry Chem 330 Biochemistry Biol 334 Cellular Biology CJ 220 Criminal Justice Systems CJ 222 Criminal Investigations and Law Enforcement CJ 343 Criminology Capstone: Chem 309 Introduction to Forensic Science Biol/Chem 319 Internship Biol/Chem 387 Capstone Course **Capstone Experience – The department allows students to fulfill the requirement of a capstone experience in a variety of ways. Students can combine a summer research experience (like an REU), an internship, a seminar Biol/Chem 370) or on campus research experience (Biol/Chem 398) with Chem 386 – Capstone Writing and Presentation to complete the capstone requirement. Students using a seminar as part of the capstone experience will need to complete a literature review of a topic explored in the seminar as a basis for their paper and presentation in Chem 386. *To increase a student’s competitiveness for employment or for students planning on going to graduate school in a field related to biochemistry/forensics science, it is recommended to take at least 2 additional electives selected from the following: Biol 225 Physiology Biol 251 Microbiology Biol 340 Immunology Chem 301 Physical Chemistry Biol/Chem 398 Independent Research And all of the supporting courses listed below: Phil 250 Applied Ethics Math 151 Calculus I Math 152 Calculus II Physics 151/152 or 191/192 Forensic Science Minor The forensic science minor is intended for law enforcement personnel, and persons in other fields, for whom a basic knowledge of forensic techniques and the science on which they are based would be helpful. Students intending to fulfill this minor are strongly urged to consult with the forensic science advisor. Students will complete seven courses as follows: Required Chem 101 General Chemistry I Chem 102 General Chemistry II Biol 111 Principles of Biology II CJ 220 Criminal Justice Systems CJ 222 Criminal Investigations Soc 210 Statistics for the Social Sciences Choose one course from the required or elective courses for the biochemistry/forensic science major. [-]

BA

Bachelor of Arts in Music

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 USA Indianola

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with a major in music is a 128-credit degree in which the number of courses in music is less than in the professionally-oriented Bachelor of Music degree, thereby making more hours available for non-music courses. The degree does, however, require a well-rounded set of courses that will leave the student with excellent musical understanding and performance skills. In addition, the student has the freedom to pursue a secondary area of interest, which might form the basis of a specific kind of professional training. Most students pursuing a double major (music and another field) choose the BA degree. [+]

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree with a major in music is a 128-credit degree in which the number of courses in music is less than in the professionally-oriented Bachelor of Music degree, thereby making more hours available for non-music courses. The degree does, however, require a well-rounded set of courses that will leave the student with excellent musical understanding and performance skills. In addition, the student has the freedom to pursue a secondary area of interest, which might form the basis of a specific kind of professional training. Most students pursuing a double major (music and another field) choose the BA degree. Students who earned the BA degree in music at Simpson College have enjoyed employment as administrators with arts organizations, attended graduate school to earn MBA degrees, attended graduate school in music, become private music teachers, and numerous other options. The BA allows the greatest amount of curricular flexibility. Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Music Required: (Credits) Mus 151-152 Theory 1 & 2 (6) Mus 153-154 Aural Skills 1 & 2 (2) Mus 251 Theory 3 (3) Mus 253 Aural Skills 3 (1) Mus 101 Survey of Music Literature (2) Mus 281 Conducting (2) Mus 270 Applied Music (private study in voice OR an instrument) (10) Mus 214 Ensembles (6) Mus 000B or Mus 000S Senior recital - capstone (0) Mus 00X Piano Proficiency (0) Two courses from: Mus 201 Medieval and Renaissance Music (2) Mus 202 Music of the 17th and 18th Centuries (2) Mus 203 Music of the 19th through 21st Centuries (2) Total (36 credits + capstone) Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Minor in Music Required: (Credits) Mus 101 Survey of Music Literature (2) AND Mus 201 or 202 or 203 (2) OR Mus 103 Discovering Music (4) Mus 151-152 Theory 1 & 2 (6) Mus 153-154 Aural Skills 1 & 2 (2) Mus 270 Applied Music (4) Mus 214 Ensemble (6) Music History Literature course (1) to be selected from: Mus 201 Medieval and Renaissance Music (2) Mus 202 Music of the 17th and 18th Centuries (2) Mus 203 Music of the 19th through 21st Centuries (2) OR Advanced Music History or Literature course with permission of the instructor: Mus 291, Mus 292, Mus 350, Mus 351, Mus 352, Mus 354, Mus 355, Mus 357, or Mus 358 Total (24 credits) [-]

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