Siena College

Introduction
AACSB Accredited

Siena College is a private, Catholic liberal arts college located in Loudonville, NY.

Siena College is a private, Catholic, liberal arts college located in Loudonville, New York—10 minutes from the state capital of Albany in the heart of the New York’s Capital Region.

With 32 majors, 80-plus minors and certificates, and prestigious joint-degree programs in liberal arts, science and business, Saints have over 1,200 unique ways to reach their personal and professional goals. But that’s just the beginning.

Our 3,000 Saints come from all over the world and leave not only with with a deeper understanding of it, but the tools needed to take an active and meaningful part in it. They quickly realize a Siena education isn’t something you get, it’s something you do.

Hundreds of student life options ranging from Red Cross to rugby join with Siena’s 22-sport Division I athletic program to provide students the opportunity to get in the game, whatever their interests may be. Extensive study abroad programs and immersive service-learning allow for discovery and reflection.

Saints work closely with their professors (12:1 student-faculty ratio), taking advantage of one-of-a-kind resources and one-on-one research opportunities in all fields. A Siena education is strengthened through a robust internship program that includes top startup companies, nonprofits and government organizations that drive this region’s growth.

High-impact learning centers, caring and engaged faculty who draw out the best in their students, and a Franciscan tradition of service and community define who we are and give students a lifetime advantage.

Saints succeed. Ninety-five percent of recent graduates are employed or continuing their education, many working and studying at top organizations and graduate programs. A third of our graduates say a Siena connection led to their first job.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Bachelor

Creative Arts Major

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Creative arts at Siena is an interdisciplinary program offering focused study in visual arts, music, theatre or broadcast journalism, preparing you for personal, academic or professional work in the arts. [+]

If you have a passion for the arts—whether it’s a love of music, theatre, painting, drawing, videography, photography or broadcast journalism—consider majoring in the creative arts at Siena. Siena’s Creative Arts Department will provide you with focused study in the visual arts, music, theatre, or broadcast journalism, preparing you for personal, academic, or professional work in the arts. In addition to classroom learning, you’ll have opportunities to attend and perform in campus shows, mount exhibits, and tour area museums. Creative Arts coursework Want to prepare for a career in music? Explore our courses in vocal and orchestral performance, music history, and music theory. If theatre is your passion, take performance, theatre management, or set design. Or try your hand at documentary filmmaking, broadcast journalism, graphic design, costume and makeup design, or painting. You can even combine courses in different areas to create an intermedia arts experience. Our Creative Arts home Housed in historic Foy Hall, our Creative Arts Department is home to studio art classrooms, a state-of-the-art digital lab, an acting studio, music practice rooms, and lecture and rehearsal halls. Foy Hall also houses Siena’s experimental studio lab, Beaudoin Theater, scene and costume shops, lighting and sound booths, and the Carol and Joseph Reilly SCTV station and broadcasting studio. Hands-on opportunities As a creative arts student, you’ll have plenty of hands-on and extracurricular opportunities to perfect your craft. Experiential opportunities include Siena’s chamber orchestra, chamber singers, college chorus, campus radio station (88.3 FM, WVCR The Saint), and theatre productions. Internships are available with local radio and television stations, recording studios, local theatres, galleries, graphic design studios, museums, and photography studios. Program Highlights Choose from a wide range of interests to experiment with your ideas or you can focus on one artistic discipline. Hands-on and extracurricular opportunities, including chamber orchestra, chamber singers, college chorus, campus radio station (88.3 FM, WVCR The Saint), and theatre productions, help students perfect their craft. Skills Developed Creativity Research Idea generation Discipline Focus Collaboration Analysis Leadership Internship Sites Albany Institute of History and Art Albany Symphony Orchestra Capital Repertory Theatre New York State Museum Proctors Times Union Center Career Opportunities Graphic Designer Interior Designer Music Director Instrumental Musicians Fine Artist Multimedia Artist Art, Drama, and Music Professor Art Director Actor Curator Film/Video Editor Radio/Television Announcer Broadcast and Journalism Professor Producer/Director Broadcast Industry Photographer Museum Technician Museums/Historical Sites Industry [-]

Interdisciplinary Studies (Design Your Own Major)

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Student Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) is a rigorous program for highly motivated students who have a clear plan, the creativity, and the determination to chart their own course of study. It is designed for students who have an interest other than the ones covered by traditional majors. SDIM can be a primary major or a second major. [+]

The Student Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) is a rigorous program for highly motivated students who have a clear plan, the creativity, and the determination to chart their own course of study. It is designed for students who have an interest other than the ones covered by traditional majors. SDIM can be a primary major or a second major. The Student Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) is a rigorous program for highly motivated students who have a clear plan, the creativity, and the determination to chart their own course of study. It is designed for students who have an interest other than the ones covered by traditional majors. SDIM can be a primary major or a second major. This is an opportunity for students to design their own major and earn a B.A. in Interdsiciplary Studies with a concentration noted on their transcript. Highlights of the program include working closely with a faculty advisor and the interdisiplinary nature of the major. Students are encouraged to be creative in their approach to designing their own interdisciplinary major. Some of the concentrations a student might pursue include: Asian Studies Catholic Studies Gender Studies Latina/o Studies Latin American Studies Middle Eastern Studies Medieval Studies Catholic Studies Peace and War Studies Theatrical Studies Students could also expand many minors into a major through this program, including: Broadcast and Society Criminal Justice Franciscan Service and Advocacy Health Management Health Studies International Business International Studies Medieval and Renaissance Studies Multicultural Studies Multimedia Peace Studies Revolutionary Era Studies Women’s Studies Less disciplinarily focused options might include: Human Consciousness Studies (Biology, Psychology and Philosophy) Animal Ethics (Biology, Philosophy, Environmental Studies) Power and the Human Condition (Political Science, Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology, Economics, Finance) Poverty and the American Experience ( Economics, American Studies, Religious Studies, Peace Studies) Coursework (39 credits minimum) courses from at least 3 different departments no more than 15 credits from any single department no more than 12 credits of independent studies required Research Colloquium and Capstone (6 credits) Eligibility Students who have completed at least 24 credits at Siena (transfers may be considered after completing one semester) with a 3.3 GPA or higher. The GPA must be maintained to continue in the program. Mentoring Community Once the project is accepted, each student will work with an advisor and at least two additional faculty members within a Mentoring Group. The advisor and student will work together to set up this group which is made up of appropriate faculty members from various departments that correspond to the subject to be studied. A different Mentoring Group will be established for each student. The role of the faculty is to support the student throughout the course of study and to assist the student as he or she formulates her/his thesis topic. Students should meet with this group regularly, perhaps over meals, to discuss the program of study. The goal here is to set up a communal and engaged learning experience for the student. If a faculty member is unable – because of sabbatical, leave, retirement, or other reason – to take part within the Mentoring Group, additional members can be added in consultation with the advisor. Other Details All of the published guidelines in the catalog for majors apply. If students have a double major, they will not be considered to have completed a second major unless at least seven of the courses successfully completed in the fulfillment of the second major are different courses from those taken to fulfill the primary major. A 3 credit hour Research Colloquium is preparation for the 3 credit hour Capstone experience which includes a thesis project. The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty advisor. These two courses (SDIM350 and SDIM400) are 6 of the credits required for the major. Students will offer a thesis “Defense” which will be open to the public. It is possible that a symbiotic relationship may develop with a student in the program who is also writing an Honors thesis, or a thesis for another major. Details on any relationship will need to be worked out with the Honors Director and/or the Chair of the other department. It is possible that a student will write one thesis that will count for both the Honors program and the Interdisciplinary Studies major. Interested? If this sounds like the right path for you, your next steps should be to meet with Program Director or any member of the Interdisciplinary Major Committee to discuss options and explore possibilities with faculty members. Who’s the program for? Smart, highly motivated, independent self-starters like you. What’s in it for you? Customized classes: You design your academic program with your faculty adviser. Personalized attention: Besides taking advantage of Siena’s small class sizes, you’ll work closely with your advisor and at least two other faculty mentors throughout your course of study. Broad flexibility: To fulfill the requirements of your major, you’ll select courses from at least three different academic departments. How do you get into the program? As an undeclared Liberal Arts, Business or Science major, you spend your first year taking core courses required of all Siena students. You maintain a 3.3 grade point average. During the first semester of your sophomore year, you work up a proposal with a faculty member who will recommend you for the program and be your advisor. Once the proposal is reviewed and approved, you’re off and running with a course of study you have created! What are some possible concentrations? Criminal Justice Multimedia Middle Eastern, Latin American or Asian Studies International Business Public Health Forensic Science The possibilities are only limited by your imagination and creativity! [-]

Major in French

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

A major in French means opening the door to French and Francophone cultures, amazing travel experiences and a language spoken by 338 million people in the world. It creates possibilities for interacting with others at the national and/or international level in industries such as business, politics and education. [+]

A major in French means opening the door to French and Francophone cultures, amazing travel experiences and a language spoken by 338 million people in the world. It creates possibilities for interacting with others at the national and/or international level in industries such as business, politics and education. Program Highlights A variety of Study Abroad programs in France and French-speaking countries, some of which include volunteer learning experiences or business internships in France, Belgium and Senegal. French conversation courses are capped at 15 students while other French courses are capped at 20 students. Faculty mentors who value and support students’ intellectual growth and success at Siena and after graduation. Some courses taught in English, including French Cinema and French Literature in translation, in order to foster diversity and multicultural awareness among students who do not speak French. Travel courses to France allow students to experience what they learn in the classroom firsthand. Undergraduate research opportunities, including independent studies and tutorials, where students work on specific research projects ranging from culinary specialties to literary, socio-political and filmic works. Skills Developed Ability to communicate in French with confidence. General knowledge of key elements of the French language (geography, family life, educational system, etc.) Awareness of key historic events related to the French language. Ability to interpret texts linguistically and stylistically. Ability to analyze authentic cultural materials such as literary pieces, news broadcasts and films. Critical thinking by making intercultural connections, as well as comparing and contrasting cultures. French writing skills for social, academic and professional purposes. [-]

BSc

B.S. in Accounting

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Accounting Program encourages students to seek as broad an education as possible by completing minors in the liberal arts and sciences, in such fields as computer science, international business, history or political science. After successful completion of the requisite major or certificate courses, students also fulfill basic requirements for admission to the licensing exams for Certified Public Accountancy in New York State, as well as other professional certifications. Students can sit for the CPA examination after earning 150 credit hours. [+]

Accounting students at Siena are educated in advanced principles, theories and real-world applications of accounting. The Accounting Program encourages students to seek as broad an education as possible by completing minors in the liberal arts and sciences, in such fields as computer science, international business, history or political science. After successful completion of the requisite major or certificate courses, students also fulfill basic requirements for admission to the licensing exams for Certified Public Accountancy in New York State, as well as other professional certifications. Students can sit for the CPA examination after earning 150 credit hours. Accountant, audit associate, controller, fiscal analyst, tax auditor—an accounting degree can lead to a host of careers, but to really excel in any, you need strong analytical, communication, technological and teamwork skills. That’s why we emphasize each here at Siena College, a high-impact learning institution located in the heart of New York’s Capital Region. Whether you think you’d like to work right away in the accounting field or pursue a master's, Siena has you covered. Expand Your Knowledge Our accounting program encourages students to seek as broad an education as possible by completing minors in the liberal arts and sciences, in fields such as computer science or history. Intern & Work for the Top Employers of graduates and student internship sites include Ayco, Deloitte, GE, IBM, KPMG, Morgan Stanley, PricewaterhouseCoopers, SiriusXM Satellite Radio and UHY Advisors. Requirements for the Major (30 cr.) ACCT200 - Financial Accounting 3 cr. The first half of the introductory course in accounting emphasizes the role of accounting as an information and communication system necessary for economic decisions. The accounting process, systems and resulting classified financial statements are covered. Financial accounting concepts and practices relating to topics such as current and long term assets, inventories, current liabilites, equity and long term liabilities are included. (ATTR: BUS, ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT205 - Managerial Accounting 3 cr. The second introductory course in accounting focuses on the managerial aspect of accounting. The emphasis is placed on internal uses of accounting information to make managerial decisions. The coverage will include topics such as: cost volume profit analysis, cost behavior, activity based costing, short term decision making, in- come tax considerations, budgeting, responsibility accounting, performance measurement, and cost control. Lab problems required. (ATTR: BUS,ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT300 - Intermediate Accounting I 3 cr. This course is the first in the two-course sequence in Intermediate Accounting. It provides a comprehensive review of the accounting process, a study of the conceptual basis of accounting, and a review of the preparation and understanding of classified financial statements. The course will focus on the study of contemporary accounting theory and the application of generally accepted accounting principles to various specific topics and financial statement items. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT305 - Intermediate Accounting II 3 cr. Continued study of contemporary accounting theory and the application of generally accepted accounting principles to various financial statement items. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT340 - Taxation I 3 cr. A study of the principles of Federal income taxation primarily focused on taxation of individuals. The course includes an introduction to tax research. Reference will be made to state tax laws to corporate taxation. Lab problems required. Lab fee. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT350 - Cost Accounting 3 cr. The principles and objectives of cost accounting, production control, and inventory control as they relate to the management decision making and control processes within the firm. Lab problems required. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 ACCT370 - Accounting Information Systems 3 cr. An introduction to accounting information systems and their roles in the accounting environment. Systems covered include manual accounting, computerized accounting and Internet electronic commerce applications. Emphasis is upon developing students’ abilities to understand the processing of accounting data and the controls that are necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of the data processed by the accounting system. (ATTR:BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 BUDV450 - Organizational Strategy 3 cr. This course deals with the development and implementation of organization strategy. It focuses on the perspectives, analytical techniques, and capabilities utilized by business professionals to improve an organization’s probability of attaining sustainable competitive advantage and success in the long term. It is considered a capstone course, which implies that students will be asked to integrate much of what they have learned in other courses into the analytical and decision-making processes. In this course, students will be expected to integrate knowledge and skills from courses in the business core, work effectively in teams, demonstrate leadership skills, communicate effectively, engage in the analysis of complex business situations, and make enlightened decisions based upon reasoned judgments. This is a multidisciplinary course, emphasizing the develop- ment of strategies that integrate accounting, financial, economics, and marketing, and management considerations. The course will be taught by professors from a variety of disciplines, but always with an emphasis on multi- disciplinary integration. This course must be taken and completed successfully at Siena. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 Accounting Electives (6 cr.) Accounting electives and other business electives will be selected after consultation with an academic advisor to determine the best mix of courses to prepare the student for their career and educational goals. Students planning to attend graduate programs in accounting should take BLAW 210 - Commercial Transactions as a business elective. Auxilary courses (3 cr.) Any CSIS course 110 or above (3 cr.) Success Stats The job placement rate upon completion of Siena’s MS in Accounting program is 99% 75% said a Siena internship led to current job The freshman retention rate is 89% 86% participate in internships The four-year graduation rate is 77% Over 50% of recent accounting graduates have entered the MS in Accounting program Employers of our Graduates and Student Internship Sites Ayco Deloitte GE IBM KPMG Morgan Stanley PricewaterhouseCoopers SiriusXM Satellite Radio UHY Advisors Job Titles of Recent Graduates Accountant Accounting Analyst Accounting Manager Assistant Comptroller Audit Associate Controller Cost Accountant Fiscal Analyst Government Contracts Accountant Global Manager, Compensation and Benefits Investment Officer Senior Accountant Tax Auditor Underwriter [-]

B.S. in Actuarial Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Actuarial Science major at Siena College is a program combining rigorous mathematical study with Economics and Finance. Students who complete the program will have satisfied the Validation by Educational Experience requirements for the Casualty Actuary Society and the Society of Actuaries. [+]

Actuarial Science is consistently rated as one of the best careers in America. This discipline is centered in assessing, pricing and ultimately managing institutional risk which is commonly used in the insurance industry and financial professions. Students who are good at mathematics that desire a professional component to their education are typically great candidates for this field. Actuarial Science is a discipline centered in assessing, pricing and ultimately managing institutional risk which is commonly used in the insurance industry and financial professions. Students who are good at mathematics that desire a professional component to their education are typically interested in this field commonly listed in the Top 10 professions. The Actuarial Science major at Siena College is a program combining rigorous mathematical study with Economics and Finance. Students who complete the program will have satisfied the Validation by Educational Experience requirements for the Casualty Actuary Society and the Society of Actuaries. The program features: Major coursework designed to prepare students for the first two professional exams. Elective coursework that will partially prepare students for the next three exams. A year-long professional seminar series featuring practicing actuaries demonstrating how principles int he curriculum are utilized in practice. Curriculum designed to prepare students for competitive national internships during the summers after your junior (or even sophomore) year. A dedicated faculty advisor that will help students prepare for exams, be prepared for professional interviews and focus elective study to maximize employability based on the strengths of the individual. Program Highlights Small classes. Emphasis on technical communication skills. Focus on long-range career success. Professional seminar series. Coursework designed to prepare students for the first two professional actuarial exams. Flexibility in choosing upper level electives. Dedicated faculty advisor to make sure students understand when to take exams, how to focus elective study and how to engage in an interview to maximize their employability. Requirements for the Major (35 cr.) CSIS110 - Intro to Computer Science 3 cr. This course is a broad introduction to a variety of fundamental topics in computer science through a contemporary theme such as robotics, the web, graphics, or gaming. Students will consider problems in the application area that can be solved with software. Using the theme of the course, students will be introduced to important areas of computer science including abstraction, computer organization, representation of information, history of computing, ethics, and the development and evaluation of algorithmic solutions using an appropriate programming environment. Themes may differ across sections. Lab fee. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ, CDQ, REC, STVN) Lecture Hours: 3 ECON430 - Econometrics 3 cr. An introduction to the application of statistical techniques to economic problems. This course includes a review of probability theory, mathematical expectation, and theoretical frequency distributions along with considerations of modeling economic phenomena. Ordinary and two-stage least squares regression techniques are utilized for hypothesis testing and economic forecasting. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC301 - Managerial Finance I 3 cr. An introduction to the principles of financial management. This course emphasizes an understanding of the role of finance within the firm. Topics covered include the elements of financial planning, valuation, cost of capital, and capital budgeting under conditions of certainty and risk. (ATTR: BUS, ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC315 - Adv Investments: Thry and Prac 3 cr. Through focusing on the development of the Markowitz Procedure, Capital Asset Pricing Model, Arbitrage Pricing and other theories, this course seeks to familiarize students with the theory underlying the practice of Finance. In addition, this course will also familiarize students with the inherent problems associated with these models as well as their strengths. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 FINC421 - Bus Financial Forecasting 3 cr. This course explores the nature of fluctuations in aggregate business activity and the technique used to forecast. To gain an understanding of these techniques, and the usefulness of forecasts, students will prepare forecasts and explore their application to firm decision making. (ATTR: BUS) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. This course completes the calculus of elementary transcendental functions. It also includes techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, L’Hospital’s Rule, improper integrals, and introduction to sequences, infinite series and power series. Students apply concepts to work, volume, arc length, and other physical phenomena. Three hours of lecture and one hour and twenty minutes of laboratory each week. Lab fee. Students must purchase an approved graphing calculator prior to beginning this course. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ) Lecture Hours: 4 MATH210 - Calculus III 4 cr. This course completes the Calculus sequence. The topics covered are vectors in the plane and in a three dimensional space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, the chain rules, multiple integration including cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems and the theorems of Green and Stokes. Students apply these concepts to physical applications. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab each week. Lab fee. (ATTR: ARTS) Lecture Hours: 4 MATH371 - Probability for Statistics 3 cr. The course introduces mathematical probability to understand variation and variability. Methods of enumeration, con- ditional probability, independent events, and Bayes’ Theorem are developed in a general environment. Among the continuous and discrete probability distributions derived and studied are the Bernoulli distribution and distributions based on it, the uniform, exponential, normal, Gamma and Chi Square distributions. The Central Limit Theorem leads to approximations for discrete distributions. Chebyshev’s In- equality prepares the student for Inferential Statistics. (may be taken concurrently). Offered Spring semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH470 - Mathematical Statistics 3 cr. Statistical tests for multivariable problems are developed and applied to real data sets. The computer and the SPSS package will be used. Offered Fall Semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 Students must also complete one of the following pairs of courses: ACCT200 - Financial Accounting 3 cr. The first half of the introductory course in accounting emphasizes the role of accounting as an information and communication system necessary for economic decisions. The accounting process, systems and resulting classified financial statements are covered. Financial accounting concepts and practices relating to topics such as current and long term assets, inventories, current liabilites, equity and long term liabilities are included. (ATTR: BUS, ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 AND ACCT205 - Managerial Accounting 3 cr. The second introductory course in accounting focuses on the managerial aspect of accounting. The emphasis is placed on internal uses of accounting information to make managerial decisions. The coverage will include topics such as: cost volume profit analysis, cost behavior, activity based costing, short term decision making, in- come tax considerations, budgeting, responsibility accounting, performance measurement, and cost control. Lab problems required. (ATTR: BUS,ISP) Lecture Hours: 3 OR MATH230 - Linear Algebra 3 cr. This course studies elements of linear algebra with an emphasis on applications. Topics covered include matrices, systems of equations, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (ATTR: ARTS) Lecture Hours: 3 AND MATH320 - Mathematical Analysis 3 cr. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematical analysis. A two-term course that studies the real number systems, limits, sequences, series, convergence, uniform convergence, functions of one variable, continuity differ- entiability, Riemann integration, functions of several variables, line, surface, and volume integrals, Offered Spring Semester. (ATTR: ARTS, MHUL) Lecture Hours: 3 Auxiliary Courses (10 cr.) ECON101 - Principles of Economics,Micro 3 cr. This course introduces students to fundamental economic concepts and theory, including demand, supply, and the formation of equilibrium prices in product and resource markets. In addition, the course offers an introduction to applied fields such as industrial organization (market structures), labor economics, unionism, international trade, and market failure. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS, CAS, ISP, CDS, STVS) Lecture Hours: 3 ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. This course examines the foundations of economic theory as it relates to unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Topics might include aggregate demand, aggregate supply, market equilibrium, national income accounting, theories of income determination, money and banking, and fiscal and monetary policies. (ATTR: ARTS or BUS, CAS, ISP, CDS, STVS) Lecture Hours: 3 MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. Courses MATH- 110, 120, and 210 provide foundation for all upper level mathematics courses. Main topics considered during the first semester: functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, the chain-rule, antiderivatives, the definite integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and trigonometric functions. Applications of all topics are emphasized. Three hours of lecture and one hour and twenty minutes of laboratory per week. Lab fee. Students must purchase an approved graphing calculator prior to begining this course. (ATTR: ARTS, CAQ, CDQ) Lecture Hours: 4 A minimum grade of B- is required in all courses in order to count towards the Actuarial Science major. Skills Developed Communicating technical information, verbally and in writing Constructing well-reasoned arguments Modeling and valuing complex financial instruments Organizing and working in teams Understanding time value of money calculations and constructing equations of value Working with real-world data Forecasting Financial behavior of a business Understanding the structure and pieces of a financial portfolio Applying technology to problem solving Employers of our Graduates Travelers The Hartford Chubb Insurance ISO Met Life Marsh Farm Family First Niagara Utica National Internship Sites New York State Insurance Department Swiss Re Munich Re Travelers The Hartford Met Life Farm Family Utica National [-]

B.S. in Biochemistry

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Siena biochemistry program provides one-on-one attention from the beginning that leads to enhanced research and learning opportunities. As a result, our alumni have high placement rates whether they pursue a job, graduate school or professional school. [+]

The Siena biochemistry program provides one-on-one attention from the beginning that leads to enhanced research and learning opportunities. As a result, our alumni have high placement rates whether they pursue a job, graduate school or professional school. As a biochemistry major at Siena, you’ll learn from faculty members who are teacher-scholars. They run vibrant undergraduate research programs while remaining student-centered, emphasizing student participation and engagement both in and out of the classroom. Our department is housed in Siena’s state-of-the-art Morrell Science Center, with additional laboratories and classroom space in the adjacent Roger Bacon Hall. Program Highlights Research opportunities for undergraduates. Small classes: Our largest classroom only seats 36 students and our largest lab has space for 16 students. Classes and labs taught by faculty (no graduate teaching assistants). Hands-on experience through the SAInT Center, which houses cutting edge, research grade scientific instruments. Access to the Siena College High Performance Computing Cluster. Opportunity to present research at regional and national conferences. Opportunity to work with faculty on nationally competitive research grants. Development of critical thinking, communication, research, advanced instrumentation, data analysis and technical writing skills. Requirements for the Major (53 cr.) BIOL220 - Cell Biology 4 cr. BIOL260 - Molecular Genetics 4 cr. BIOL420 - Biochemistry 4 cr. AND BIOL320 - Microbiology 4 cr. or BIOL255 - Comp.Anatomy of Vertebrates 4 cr. or BIOL425 - Molecular Biology 4 cr. AND CHEM110 - General Chemistry 1 4 cr. CHEM120 - General Chemistry II 4 cr. CHEM210 - Organic Chem I 4 cr. CHEM220 - Organic Chem II Lect and Lab 4 cr. CHEM225 - Analytical Chemistry 1 3 cr. CHEM240 - Inorganic Chemistry 1 3 cr. CHEM310 - Thermodynamics + Chem Equilib 3 cr. CHEM425 - Biochemical Mechanics 3 cr. CHEM426 - Senior Research 1 cr. CHEM429 - Advanced Biochemical Methods 1 cr. AND BIOL110 - General Biology I 4 cr. OR BIOL170 - Advanced General Biology 4 cr. AND BIOL120 - General Biology II Lecture 4 cr. OR BIOL180 - Advanced Gen Biology Seminar 2 cr. AND BIOL190 - Writing/Resrch Skills for Biol 3 cr. OR CHEM311 - Chemical Communications 1 cr. Auxiliary Courses (16 cr.) MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. AND PHYS110 - Gen Physics IA Lect and Lab 4 cr. OR PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. AND PHYS120 - Gen Physics IIA Lect and Lab 4 cr. OR PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. Graduate Schools Attended by our Graduates Albany Medical College Brown University Colorado State University Cornell University Miami University New York University Center for Bioethics Penn State University SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Stanford University Tufts University University at Buffalo University of Colorado-Boulder University of Connecticut University of Maryland, College Park UMass-Lowell University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill University of Rochester University of Oregon Yale University Medical Schools Attended by our Graduates Albany Medical College Boston University School of Medicine Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine New York College of Osteopathic Medicine Ross University School of Medicine SUNY Downstate Medical University University at Buffalo Medical School Professional Schools Attended by our Graduates Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Pace University School of Law University at Albany (Masters of Social Work) Employers of our Graduates Albany Medical College Albany Molecular Research, Inc AngioDynamics Atotech, Inc Bioreclamation Craig Hospital Epic Systems Global Foundries Kaleida Health North Shore-LIJ Health System Saratoga Hospital Wadsworth Center-New York State Dept. of Health [-]

B.S. in Biology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Biology educates students on the underlying principles governing life. At Siena, students learn this in small lecture and laboratory sections that are taught by department faculty (not teaching assistants). Regardless of your specific career path, the critical thinking and hands-on laboratory skills that you develop as a biology major will give you a significant advantage over the competition. [+]

Biology educates students on the underlying principles governing life. At Siena, students learn this in small lecture and laboratory sections that are taught by department faculty (not teaching assistants). Regardless of your specific career path, the critical thinking and hands-on laboratory skills that you develop as a biology major will give you a significant advantage over the competition. Our goal of placing students in competitive post-graduate programs and careers requires that we offer an intense and rigorous program. All biology majors benefit from high expectations. As a Siena College biology major, you will work hard, but along the way you will form life-long bonds and have a lot of fun, too. The high standards of our program ensure that students who excel in our program are routinely accepted into high quality medical and other professional schools. Equally important, our alums report back that their Siena education prepared them well for life after Siena. Program Highlights Small lecture and laboratory classes taught by faculty (no TAs!). A laboratory intensive curriculum, where students work directly with full time faculty who are experts in their discipline. Broadly trained faculty who also possess expertise in a particular biological discipline. Faculty members are encouraged to establish and maintain active research programs in order to remain current in their disciplines, enthusiastic about their courses and to provide independent study opportunities for students. In addition to a biology core curriculum, all students take courses in the areas of cell/molecular biology, physiology, morphology and organismic/population biology. An emphasis on critical thinking and active engagement in the biological sciences. Independent research opportunities that allow students to creatively build on fundamental concepts and techniques to address interesting biological questions. This includes on-campus independent research courses mentored by department faculty. Off-campus science internships in biology are offered for credit. Development of marketable skills: critical thinking, quantitative analysis, curiosity and creating thinking, written and oral communication, working cooperatively in a team environment, hands-on laboratory skills in a variety of areas. Requirements (36 cr.) BIOL110 - General Biology I 4 cr. OR BIOL170 - Advanced General Biology 4 cr. AND BIOL120 - General Biology II Lecture 4 cr. OR BIOL180 - Advanced Gen Biology Seminar 2 cr. AND BIOL190 - Writing/Resrch Skills for Biol 3 cr. BIOL260 - Molecular Genetics 4 cr. One course from each of the following areas: Cellular & Molecular (CEMO) Morphology (MORP) Organismic & Population (ORPO) Physiology (PHYL) 3 additional Biology Electives 220 level or greater with the exception of Genetics Lab & Biology Seminar. Independent research in Biology (Biol-499) may fulfill up to one of the three additional courses but only if the course is taken for 2 or 3 credits. A total of 11 biology courses must be completed Auxiliary Courses (32 cr.) CHEM110 - General Chemistry 1 4 cr. CHEM120 - General Chemistry II 4 cr. CHEM210 - Organic Chem I 4 cr. CHEM220 - Organic Chem II Lect and Lab 4 cr. MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. AND PHYS110 - Gen Physics IA Lect and Lab 4 cr. OR PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. AND PHYS120 - Gen Physics IIA Lect and Lab 4 cr. OR PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. Success Stats The United States medical school acceptance rate over the past four years is 88%. This is more than double the national average. 1 in 5 biology students study abroad 94% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school 100% of courses are taught by faculty (no teaching assistants) 75% of regular courses include a lab component The average number of students involved in independent study or research per semester during the past three years is 37 The amount in research grants secured over the past six years is $1.5 million 63% pursue a graduate degree after Siena There were 15 presentations at regional, national, or international research conferences co-authored by Siena biology majors in the last two years Employers of our Graduates Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Life Technologies Pzifer, Inc. New York State Police Forensics Department Bristol-Myers Squibb GE Albany Medical Center Boston Heart Diagnostics Lab Massachusetts General Hospital New York State Department of Environmental Conversation Mount Sinai Hospital Graduate/Professional Schools Attended by our Graduates Albany Medical College Albert Einstein College of Medicine Cornell University New York University University at Albany, School of Public Health University at Buffalo School of Medicine University of Maryland Careers or Postgraduate Programs Entered by Recent Graduates Medicine Dentistry Optometry Veterinary Medicine Physician’s Assistant Physical Therapy Pharmacy Chiropractor Cytotechnology Graduate School: MS and PhD programs in fields such as ecology, genetics and neuroscience Occupational Therapy Nursing Speech Therapy Laboratory Technician Secondary Education Teaching [-]

B.S. in Business

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena College’s business major is a flexible, multidisciplinary program that allows students to customize the curriculum based on their individual interests and career goals. [+]

Siena College’s business major is a flexible, multidisciplinary program that allows students to customize the curriculum based on their individual interests and career goals. Students in the business major first experience our business core courses and, after sampling a variety of subjects, choose two concentrations anytime before their junior year. They graduate with a bachelor’s degree in business and two concentrations listed on their transcript. The 20 concentrations include: International Business Entrepreneurship Business Analytics Accounting Theory and Foundations Corporate Accounting and Internal Controls Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting Foundations of Economics Real World Economics Fundamentals of Finance Investment Fundamentals Corporate Finance Financial Planning Strategic Human Resource Development Ethical Leadership in a Global Environment Not-For-Profit Consulting Strategic Communication Market Research and Analytics Sales and Business to Business Marketing Marketing Communications and Digital Marketing Sports and Services Marketing Highlights: Customization. Students are able to choose concentrations that are most appealing to them. Choices. Students have the flexibility to choose courses of study and combinations of concentrations that meet their unique needs and desires, as compared to choosing from a handful of majors. Marketability. The concentrations offered are current, relevant and valuable in today's marketplace and make our students' resumes to stand out. Interdisciplinary. Students from the Schools of Liberal Arts and Science can expand their educational experience by completing a concentration from the business major. Pre-Business Foundation and Skills (12 credit and 5 courses) In addition to the courses listed below, students must also choose two business concentrations (15 credits each). ECON101 - Principles of Economics,Micro 3 cr. ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. QBUS100 - Math for Decision Making I 3 cr. QBUS110 - Math for Decision Making II 3 cr. One of the following: CSIS010 - Intro to Computer Applications 3 cr. OR CSIS011 - Prob Solving With Spreadsheets 1 cr. OR CSISSSX - Spreadsheet Exam 0 cr. Business Core (31.000 credits and 10 courses) ACCT200 - Financial Accounting 3 cr. ACCT205 - Managerial Accounting 3 cr. BLAW200 - Legal Environment of Business 3 cr. BUDV450 - Organizational Strategy 3 cr. CSIS114 - Management Information Systems 3 cr. FINC301 - Managerial Finance I 3 cr. MGMT211 - Management 3 cr. MRKT212 - Marketing 3 cr. QBUS200 - Business Statistics I 4 cr. MGMT300 - Operations Management 3 cr. [-]

B.S. in Chemistry

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Chemistry students develop a solid foundation in chemical principles through coursework, state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and research opportunities. Recent grads have worked at GE, Albany Molecular Research and New York State’s Wadsworth Center Laboratory. [+]

Chemistry students develop a solid foundation in chemical principles through coursework, state-of-the-art laboratory equipment and research opportunities. Recent grads have worked at GE, Albany Molecular Research and New York State’s Wadsworth Center Laboratory. Chemistry: The Central Science “Chemistry: The central science.” That phrase, popularized in a 1977 chemistry textbook, refers to the link that chemistry provides between the physical sciences, mathematics, biological sciences, and the environment. Chemistry and biochemistry play a fundamental role in our everyday lives—from the air we breathe, the water we drink, and soil we walk upon to the food we eat, the medicine that improves our health, and the clothes we wear. Why Study Chemistry at Siena? As a chemistry major at Siena, you’ll learn from faculty members who are teacher-scholars. They run vibrant undergraduate research programs while remaining student-centered, emphasizing student participation and engagement both in and out of the classroom. Our department is housed in Siena’s state-of-the-art Morrell Science Center, with additional laboratories and classroom space in the adjacent Roger Bacon Hall. ​Program Highlights Research is an important part of education at Siena. It is not uncommon for chemistry students to become involved in research as early as their Freshman year. The Chemistry Department houses the Saint Center’s cutting edge, research grade scientific instruments. Close integration with the Siena College High Performance Computing Cluster. In the 2012-2013 academic year Chemistry and Biochemistry students and faculty gave a total of 17 presentations at 5 local, regional and national conferences. Skills developed include: critical thinking, communication skills, research experience, ability to use advanced instrumentation, data analysis and technical writing. Requirements for the major (39 cr.) CHEM110 - General Chemistry 1 4 cr. CHEM120 - General Chemistry II 4 cr. CHEM210 - Organic Chem I 4 cr. CHEM225 - Analytical Chemistry 1 3 cr. CHEM240 - Inorganic Chemistry 1 3 cr. CHEM310 - Thermodynamics + Chem Equilib 3 cr. CHEM311 - Chemical Communications 1 cr. CHEM315 - Physical Chemistry I Lab 1 cr. CHEM320 - Quantum Mech and Spectroscopy 3 cr. CHEM415 - Analytical Chemistry II 2 cr. CHEM426 - Senior Research 1 cr. CHEM428 - Physical Biochemistry 3 cr. CHEM429 - Advanced Biochemical Methods 1 cr. CHEM430 - Inorganic Synthesis 1 cr. One additional courses above CHEM 300 must be taken to complete the major (1 cr.) Auxiliary courses (16 cr.) MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. Recent Graduate/Professional School Placements Albany Medical School, Physicians Assistant Studies Duke University Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing Lock Haven Physicians Assistant School Michigan State University New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine Northwestern University Penn State University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Ross University Veterinary School SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Stony Brook University St. George’s University School of Medicine Tufts University University at Albany University of California - Irvine University of Delaware University of Massachusetts - Amherst University of Michigan University of Nebraska University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Washington State University Yale University Employers of our Graduates Albany Molecular Research, Inc DuPont USA Fortitech, Inc General Electric GlobalFoundries Graver Technologies Hovione NYS Department of Health Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Sherwin Williams Toyko Electron LTD University of Maryland Medical Center Xerox Research Center [-]

B.S. in Computational Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Computational Science is a modern interdisciplinary field that focuses on solving scientific problems computationally. It combines advanced methods and tools from applied mathematics and computer science to study real-world scientific problems, often by using computer simulations and modeling. Students interested in becoming computational scientists, can start off on the right foot at Siena College. [+]

Computational Science is a modern interdisciplinary field that focuses on solving scientific problems computationally. It combines advanced methods and tools from applied mathematics and computer science to study real-world scientific problems, often by using computer simulations and modeling. Students interested in becoming computational scientists, can start off on the right foot at Siena College. Program Highlights Only a handful of colleges in the United States offer a major/minor in computational science at the undergraduate level. Students acquire skills in the areas of programming, simulation and modeling, numerical methods and applied mathematics, computer visualization techniques, computational tools and applications to natural sciences and technical communication. Access to the High Performance Computing Cluster, allowing students to perform cutting edge computational research. The computational science program is highly interdisciplinary, combining mathematics, physics, computer science and applied computational techniques. The presence of large nanotech and biotech companies in the Capital Region puts Siena’s graduates in an excellent position when looking for jobs, entering careers in industry or government labs or pursuing graduate studies. Requirements for the Major (73 cr.) CSIS110 - Intro to Computer Science 3 cr. CSIS120 - Intro to Programming 4 cr. CSIS210 - Data Structures 3 cr. CSIS310 - Numerical Methods 3 cr. CSIS385 - Design+Analysis of Algorithim 3 cr. MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. MATH210 - Calculus III 4 cr. MATH230 - Linear Algebra 3 cr. MATH240 - Intro to Computer Algebra 3 cr. MATH250 - Discrete Structures 4 cr. MATH380 - Differential Equations 3 cr. PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. PHYS222 - Modern Physics 3 cr. PHYS250 - Intro to Computational Physics 3 cr. PHYS310 - Mechanics I 4 cr. PHYS350 - Simulation and Modeling 3 cr. SCDV230 - Electronic Instrumentation 4 cr. Students may choose two courses (6 cr.) from the following: CSIS225 - Object-Oriented Des and Prog 3 cr. CSIS380 - Computer Graphics 3 cr. CSIS400 - Adv Topics in Computer Science 1 TO 3 cr. Students may choose one course (3 cr.) from the following: CSIS499 - Independent Study in Comp Sci 1 TO 3 cr. MATH499 - Independent Study in Math 1 TO 3 cr. PHYS470 - Advanced Laboratory I 1 TO 3 cr. SCDV480 - Internship in Science 1 TO 3 cr. Careers Computational Science students are well-prepared for graduate studies at prestigious universities or for careers in information technology, high-tech manufacturing, engineering design, computational physics, computational biology, computational chemistry, computational finance and computer graphics. [-]

B.S. in Computer Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Computer Science focuses on solving problems from a scientific perspective by applying software engineering, information systems and computational theory. Our program emphasizes group projects, hands-on labs and one-on-one interaction to ensure students’ success in their future careers. Why choose CS? The careers are diverse and exciting, employment opportunities are increasing and starting salaries are among the highest for bachelor degree graduates. [+]

Computer Science focuses on solving problems from a scientific perspective by applying software engineering, information systems and computational theory. Our program emphasizes group projects, hands-on labs and one-on-one interaction to ensure students’ success in their future careers. Why choose CS? The careers are diverse and exciting, employment opportunities are increasing and starting salaries are among the highest for bachelor degree graduates. Computer science careers are diverse and exciting, employment opportunities are increasing, and starting salaries are among the highest for bachelor’s degree graduates. As a computer science major at Siena, you’ll study topics including Java programming, user interface design, hardware, computer graphics, robotics, databases, web design, and artificial intelligence. We emphasize group projects, hands-on laboratory learning, and one-on-one interaction with faculty. Siena’s B.S. in computer science requires coursework in computer science and mathematics. As a computer science major, you will also participate in a senior-year capstone experience in software engineering. Most of our students participate in our well-established internship program, as well. We also offer opportunities to conduct research with computer science faculty. Program Highlights The Computer Science Department at Siena is one the largest at any liberal arts college. 14 full-time faculty experts specializing in areas such as databases, computer graphics, robotics, artificial intelligence and web application development. Students can concentrate coursework in specific career areas or take a broad array of different CS courses to prepare for graduate study. Student-centered labs, which are capped at 16 students. Independent study courses with faculty mentors. Paid internship and summer research opportunities. Regional and national conference attendance. Project-based software design and development capstone course. Student clubs: Association for Computing Machinery student chapter and Women in Computer Science. Preparation for careers such as software engineer/developer, project manager, Java developer, application security engineer, web/mobile application developer, web design specialist, database administrator, information technology specialist, web design consultant, data analyst, quality assurance engineer and business intelligence developer. Requirements for the Major (35 Cr.) CSIS120 - Intro to Programming 4 cr. CSIS210 - Data Structures 3 cr. CSIS220 - Assembly Lang and Comp Archtcr 4 cr. CSIS225 - Object-Oriented Des and Prog 3 cr. CSIS385 - Design+Analysis of Algorithim 3 cr. CSIS410 - Software Engineering I 3 cr. CSIS415 - Software Engineering II 3 cr. AND CSIS110 - Intro to Computer Science 3 cr. And 3 additional courses between CSIS 310 and CSIS 499 (9 cr.) OR 4 additional CSIS electives between 310 and 499 (12 cr.) Note: CSIS-251 and CSIS-351 may not be applied toward the required CSIS credits in Computer Science, however, CSIS-351 (Discrete Structures II) may apply towards the required CSIS credits if a student is a double CS/Physics major taking the Computational Science track for the Physics major. Auxiliary courses (15 cr.) MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. MATH250 - Discrete Structures 4 cr. MATH350 - Theory of Computation 3 cr . Success Stats 100% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school 40% of students participate in an independent study or research project 57% complete at least one internship for credit 45% of faculty are female vs. the national average of 15% The freshman retention rate is 96% Siena is one of two colleges nationally to offer the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Research Experience funded by the National Science Foundation. Students receive a $5,000 stipend along with full room and board during the summer. Recent Internship Sites 3M Albany Crime Analysis Center BOCES Credit Suisse Doctored Apps Ernst Information Systems Google New York State Office of Information Technology New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance New York State Senate IT Department Pitney Bowes Employers of our Graduates Amazon Bank of America CDPHP Cisco ESPN GE IBM Key Bank Lockheed Martin MetLife National Hockey League rewardStyle SiriusXM Satellite Radio Transfinder Vanguard Xerox Job Titles of Recent Graduates Application Team Lead Associate Engineer Business Analyst Chief Operating Officer Computer Programmer Database Administrator Developer Director of Product Management Director of Software Engineering IT Engineer Lead Technician Programmer Project Manager Senior Technical Consultant Senior Security Engineer Software Developer Software Engineer Web Developer Web and Mobile Developer [-]

B.S. in Economics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

You should consider Economics if you enjoy clear and logical approaches to exploring the riches and poverty which characterize economic life. Your studies in Economics will help you gain perspectives and solve problems related to public life, the business world, and the decisions shaping your future. [+]

You should consider Economics if you enjoy clear and logical approaches to exploring the riches and poverty which characterize economic life. Your studies in Economics will help you gain perspectives and solve problems related to public life, the business world, and the decisions shaping your future. If you pick up the newspaper or turn on the news, it’s clear that economic forces impact all of us on a daily basis. The field of economics encompasses important societal issues, from social welfare programs, employment rates, and income inequality to inflation, monopolies, and antitrust laws. Why study economics? A background in economics helps you understand, debate, discuss, and form national and international policy. Economists ask questions about societal programs and problems and employ mathematical and statistical tools to form sound policy. If you’re interested in international trade, international affairs, business cycles, or the stock markets, consider majoring in economics. A degree in economics also prepares you for careers in banking, law, marketing, journalism, environmental science, and medicine. Program Highlights Siena’s economics program is committed to undergraduate education and takes seriously the principles of economic justice related to Siena’s Franciscan tradition. The program provides an education valuable for employment and for life via: Liberal arts focus, preparing students for a variety of rewarding careers. Focus on data, policy, and Siena’s Franciscan tradition. Strong analytic foundation, including calculus and econometrics. Diverse faculty of over 40% women The program emphasizes community engagement, and undergraduate research including: Working with community partners is an essential element of selected economics classes. Undergraduate research mentored by departmental faculty Funded summer research Off-campus presentation of research Econometrics capstone project Fed Challenge competition on monetary policy Honors program thesis mentoring The B.S. provides professional preparation appropriate for immediate employment in business and public sector occupations within and outside economics. The program also provides a foundation for graduate study in areas including Business Administration, Law, Forecasting, and of course Economics. Requirements for the Major (30 cr.) ECON101 - Principles of Economics,Micro 3 cr. ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. ECON201 - Micro-Economic Analysis 3 cr. ECON202 - Macro-Economic Analysis 3 cr. ECON430 - Econometrics 3 cr. Economics electives (15 cr.). Three courses (9 credits) of electives must be at the 300 level or above. Economics electives will be selected after consultation with an academic advisor to determine the best mix of courses to prepare the student for their career and educational goals. Skills Developed Economics graduates at Siena College become particularly skilled at analysis and problem solving. Taking seriously our objective to use economic theory and data together to assess economic policy in light of Franciscan values, students pursuing the major and minor work develop not only data management skills, but also logical and ethical frameworks in which to analyze data. Employers repeatedly comment on the exceptional analytical thinking shown by our graduates. Employers of our Graduates Bank of America Briglia, Hundley, Nuttal & Lopez, P.C. Campbell Soup Company CFI Securities LLC Cioffi Slezak Wildgrube PC Dion Money Managment Forbes Franciscan Community Center General Electric Goldman, Sachs & Co. Governor’s Budget Division H.D. Fayette Elementary School Halliday Financial Group Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates New York Independent System Operator New York Life Insurance Company New York Stock Exchange NYS Assembly NYS Dept. of Health Oppenheimer & Company Orange County District Attorney Pitcairn Properties State University Construction Fund Sweetwater Logistics The Albany Academies The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc Travelers Insurance Company Travelers Insurance Company Union Savings Bank University of California, Davis Walsh, Wicks & Sallisbury Internship Sites City of Schenectady Connecticut State Department of Corrections General Electric Global New York State Office of the Controller Peter Young Housing, Industries and Treatment Program Public Service Commission Riverkeeper (Hudson River) U.S. Senate United States Public Interest Research Group Bank of America The Ayco Co. (a Goldman Sachs Company) Peter Harris Clothing [-]

B.S. in Environmental Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The environmental studies and sciences program provides an interdisciplinary foundation for students interested in the identification, study and solution of environmental problems. By integrating field work, community engagement, internships and geospatial analysis into a liberal arts curriculum, students gain the skills necessary to take their passion for the environment to the next level. [+]

The environmental studies and sciences program provides an interdisciplinary foundation for students interested in the identification, study and solution of environmental problems. By integrating field work, community engagement, internships and geospatial analysis into a liberal arts curriculum, students gain the skills necessary to take their passion for the environment to the next level. In a time of climate instability, environmental impacts and challenges are many. As an environmental studies or environmental science major at Siena, you'll be prepared for careers in ecological restoration; pollution abatement; sustainability coordination; renewable energy systems; and environmental education, policy or law, to name just a few. Why study environmental studies and sciences at Siena? Our interdisciplinary faculty is committed to providing an undergraduate education that integrates hands-on experience and research opportunities. Siena’s location in New York’s Capital Region will give you easy access to field study sites in the Hudson River Valley and Adirondack Mountains. Our liberal arts core provides a foundation in communication and critical-thinking skills that will make you an effective environmental advocate. An active student environmental club will get you involved in community environmental education and citizen science projects. The environmental science degree track leads to a Bachelor of Science and focuses on solving environmental problems with ecological and analytical tools. This major requires significant coursework in mathematics, biology, and chemistry or physics. If you’re thinking about a career in natural resources management, environmental toxicology, or energy systems, this is the major for you. Program Highlights Preparation for careers in ecological restoration, pollution abatement, sustainability coordination, renewable energy systems, environmental education, policy and law. Faculty committed to providing undergraduate education that integrates writing, hands-on experiences, and research opportunities across the curriculum. Capital Region location provides easy access to field study sites in the Hudson River Valley and the Adirondack Mountains. Access to and use of Geographic Information Systems. The Environmental Science track is sharply focused on solving environmental problems with ecological and analytical tools with coursework in mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics. The Environmental Studies track draws upon the social sciences and humanities as problem-solving tools and pairs well with programs such as political science, international studies, business or community development. [-]

B.S. in Finance

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena's finance program provides students with a robust core of courses as well as highly specialized electives that bridge to professional careers or graduate school. By integrating the use of the Hickey Financial Technology Center into our curriculum, we provide students access to unparalleled hands-on experience with tools and technology used in the financial industry. [+]

Siena's finance program provides students with a robust core of courses as well as highly specialized electives that bridge to professional careers or graduate school. By integrating the use of the Hickey Financial Technology Center into our curriculum, we provide students access to unparalleled hands-on experience with tools and technology used in the financial industry. Our curriculum is designed to develop your ability to identify financial problems, analyze their impact, and design solutions that will withstand critical examination. As a finance major, you will receive the foundation necessary to become a well-rounded, ethical, and innovative thinker. The advantages of majoring in finance at Siena: As a finance major at Siena, you’ll get a strong liberal arts education as well as rigorous accounting and finance coursework and highly specialized electives. Our Hickey Financial Technology Center is a major part of our finance program, providing you with access to and experience with real-world situations you will encounter in your finance career. What can you do with a major in finance? Siena’s finance majors are well positioned for graduate school and a wide range of careers, including: Corporate Finance (financial analysis and reporting, corporate financial and tax planning, credit management, general accounting and auditing, cash control and risk management, and capital budgeting) Securities (securities and portfolio analysis, securities brokerage, pension fund management, investor relations, portfolio management, and hedge fund management) Banking and Financial Institutions (bank management and control, lending, marketing, credit policy, financial analysis, trusts, customer service) Real Estate and Insurance (corporate and retail risk management, mortgage analysis, underwriting, appraisal, and insurance brokerage) The Hickey Financial Technology Center Siena’s Hickey Financial Technology Center (HFTC) supplements your classroom learning with hands-on activities that give you practical finance and accounting experience. At HFTC, we simulate real and fictitious stocks and bonds, assigning projects that teach you real-world skills necessary for success in the finance industry. Program Highlights Student-managed fund for which students make all the money management decisions. All classes are taught by faculty members (no TAs here!). Hands-on use of finance tools and technology via the Hickey Financial Technology Center, including Bloomberg terminals. Annual participation in the Federal Reserve Challenge, which helps to refine students’ presentation and analytic skills. Community service-learning projects, which allow students to apply business knowledge for the benefit of a nonprofit organization. Highly specialized senior level courses such as the Student Managed Fund, Business Forecasting, Mergers & Acquisitions, Portfolio Management, Debt Securities, which prepare our students for successful careers. Preparation for careers in corporate finance, banking and financial institutions management, insurance, real estate, securities industry (as brokers and analysts), hedge fund/portfolio management, investment banking and financial planning. Major Requirements (30 cr.) FINC215 - Intro to Instit and Investment 3 cr. FINC301 - Managerial Finance I 3 cr. FINC302 - Managerial Finance II 3 cr. FINC315 - Adv Investments: Thry and Prac 3 cr. FINC413 - International Finance 3 cr. FINC418 - Case Prob in Financial Mgmt 3 cr. AND Twelve credits of Finance electives (12 cr.) Finance electives will be selected after consultation with an academic advisor to determine the best mix of courses to prepare the student for their career and educational goals. Auxiliary Courses (3 cr.) ACCT300 - Intermediate Accounting I 3 cr. OR ACCT340 - Taxation I 3 cr. Success Stats 98% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school 100% of our students are Bloomberg certified One in four students study abroad 72% of students participate in internships Two out of every three students manage real money at a $200,000 market value (Bjorklund Fund) 29% pursue a graduate degree 28% say a Siena connection led to their first or current job Employers of our Graduates and Student Internship Sites Amazon.com Anheuser-Busch, Inc. Bank of America Barclays Investment Bank BlackRock Citigroup Comcast Deutsche Bank Federal Reserve Bank of New York GE Goldman Sachs IBM JP Morgan Chase Key Bank MassMutual LLC Merrill Lynch Morgan Stanley NBT Bank Northwest Mutual Prudential Financial PwC State Farm SEFCU Target TIAA-CREF The Ayco Company The Nielsen Company U.S. Department of Homeland Security Xerox Job Titles of Recent Graduates Accounting Manager Assistant Manager - Fund Accounting Executive Operations Manager Finance Manager Financial Advisor Financial Analyst Financial Leadership Associate Financial Planner Fund Officer Implementation Manager Investment Consultant Lead Senior Accountant Real Estate Analyst Senior Associate Senior Financial Analyst Strategic Pricing Analyst Tax Specialist Treasury Analyst Underwriter Wealth Manager [-]

B.S. in Management

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Management Department prepares students to manage resources, make informed decisions, and lead with integrity in a global environment. [+]

The Management Department prepares students to manage resources, make informed decisions, and lead with integrity in a global environment. No matter where you work—start-up, small business, corporate, government, non-profit—you need a set of critical management skills to be successful in today’s diverse global environment. We asked hiring managers and accomplished alumni what our students needed to thrive in their careers and created a program based on their input. As a result, Siena’s management program is relevant, engaging, and flexible. You will learn and practice skills that apply to the changing world: thinking like an entrepreneur, managing complex projects, communicating with confidence, energizing a team toward high performance and making informed decisions. You will learn to use your talents to serve not just your employer, but society as a whole. Finish our program and start your own company, work in the public or private sectors, join a not-for-profit or pursue graduate education. You’ll have the skills you need to succeed. The Management Major at Siena College allows you to: Prepare for the real world Learn critical competencies that apply to any position in any organization. Gain additional expertise in an area of interest, such as leadership, entrepreneurship, international management, or human resource management. Develop a unique perspective on people, organizations, and the world by integrating your Franciscan and liberal arts education with the management competencies. And, learn to do your work while always working to make the world a better place. Learn through experience Participate in service learning, simulations, live cases, internships, in-depth research, student organizations, and more. Every management class includes opportunities to learn the key competencies through hands-on experiences. Create a network Interact with executives – in classes and beyond. They watch your presentations, read your reports, and provide feedback. Gain extensive knowledge of an organization through an internship or make connections by helping a start-up at the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Build an e-portfolio Create and access your portfolio to track your progress, feature your best work, impress recruiters, and refer to on the job. Study with accomplished faculty Our faculty members are practicing scholars that have extensive real-world experience – CEOs, management consultants, board members, entrepreneurs, textbook authors, and a member of President Obama’s Advisory Board. Our emphasis is on excellent teaching and bringing reality to the classroom. Program Highlights Emphasis on six different management competencies: decision making and planning, innovation and entrepreneurship, teamwork and leadership, communications, human resource development and process/project management. Our faculty members are practicing scholars that have extensive real-world experience – CEOs, management consultants, board members, entrepreneurs, textbook authors, and a member of President Obama’s Advisory Board. Every management class includes opportunities to learn the key competencies through hands-on experiences such as service-learning, simulations and live cases. Flexible curriculum that allows each student to pursue their interest. Interaction with executives who work directly with students by evaluating presentations, reading reports and providing feedback on projects. Students build an e-portfolio to use when entering the job market. Requirements for the Major (30 cr.) MGMT113 - Business Communication 3 cr. MGMT211 - Management 3 cr. MGMT329 - Organizational Behavior 3 cr. MGMT300 - Operations Management 3 cr. MGMT332 - Human Resources Management 3 cr. MGMT336 - Management Research Methods 3 cr. AND Twelve credits of Management electives, at least three of which must be a 400-level course. These can also include BUDV-305, BUDV-310, and BUDV-410. (12 cr.) Success Stats 100% of management majors have the opportunity to solve problems at Capital Region businesses before they graduate One in four say a Siena connection led to their first or current job The freshman retention rate is 81% 97% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school Recent Employers of our Graduates Coldwell Banker GE Golub Corp. HBO Key Bank KPMG IBM Interfaith Partnership for the Homeless LexisNexis Nestlé Northwestern Mutual PepsiCo Starwood Hotels State Farm Target TD Ameritrade TIAA-CREF Recent Internship Sites Albany Times Union GE Interfaith Partnership for the Homeless KPMG Madison Handbags Mazzone Hospitality New Jersey Nets Nielsen Company Northwestern Mutual Financial Network Peter Harris Clothes Price Chopper SiriusXM Satellite Radio Special Olympics New York The Ayco Company, L.P. Time Warner Cable News Tri-City Valley Cats Job Titles of Recent Graduates Account Executive Benefits Analyst Business Owner Business Continuity and Crisis Management Entrepreneur Executive Team Leader Office Manager Operations Group Leader Project Manager Sales Manager Sales and Marketing Associate Senior Group Leader Senior Human Resources Associate Web Developer [-]

B.S. in Marketing

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena's marketing degree provides a competitive edge for careers in packaged goods, sports marketing, international marketing, e-commerce (social media marketing), advertising, consulting and sales. Our approach include hands-on experience with local business and academic research with faculty, which improves our students' salary potential and advancement opportunities. [+]

Siena's marketing degree provides a competitive edge for careers in packaged goods, sports marketing, international marketing, e-commerce (social media marketing), advertising, consulting and sales. Our approach include hands-on experience with local business and academic research with faculty, which improves our students' salary potential and advancement opportunities. Siena’s marketing curriculum will provide you with the knowledge and skills to identify marketing opportunities and develop appropriate marketing strategies to profitably pursue those opportunities. At Siena, your courses will expose you to the major concepts, skills, and tools that you’ll need for a career in marketing or for graduate business programs. Why study marketing at Siena? As a Siena marketing major, your courses will give you plenty of marketing know-how, but they’ll also give you lots of opportunities to apply your knowledge to real-world marketing and business problems. You’ll develop communication, interpersonal, and analytic skills that lead to critical thinking, complex reasoning, and sound decision making. You’ll also work closely with professors and have ample internship opportunities. You can even join Siena’s chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA). Marketing Research Lab Siena’s School of Business Marketing Research Lab offers state-of-the-art facilities for students studying business statistics, marketing research, and marketing/promotion. Here, students work in teams and have access to multimedia technology and software including statistical analysis packages and geographic information system software. Careers in marketing The marketing major is suited for careers in sports, international, and business marketing; international marketing; e-commerce; advertising; public relations; consulting; retail; sales and relationship management; and marketing research. Program Highlights Learning activities include lectures, readings, discussions, case studies, real world projects and computer simulations. Faculty committed to excellence in teaching, learning and mentorship beyond graduation. Small class sizes that offer customized learning and closer interaction. Wide variety of relevant and timely elective courses. Student-faculty research leading to publications in academic journals and presentations at regional, national and international conferences. Experiential learning practices through collaboration with businesses and internship opportunities. Annual marketing colloquium, which showcases student and faculty research. Requirements for the Major (30 cr.) MGMT211 - Management 3 cr. MRKT212 - Marketing 3 cr. MRKT324 - Consumer Behavior 3 cr. MRKT334 - International Marketing 3 cr. MRKT336 - Marketing Research Methods 3 cr. MRKT435 - Marketing Management 3 cr. AND Marketing Electives (9 cr.) BUDV450 - Organizational Strategy 3 cr Success Stats 74% of students participating in internships 25% of alumni say a Siena connection led to their first or current job One in three marketing majors study abroad The freshman retention rate is 88% 96% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school Skills Developed Conduct marketing analysis Develop and implement marketing strategies Evaluate and improve marketing strategies Leadership Critical thinking Creative thinking Written and oral communication skills Teamwork Ethics Social responsibility Career Preparation Siena’s marketing degree provides preparation for graduate programs and a wide variety of industries and careers including: packaged goods, services, sports marketing, international marketing, e-commerce (social media marketing), business marketing, advertising, public relations, consulting, retail, sales and relationship management, marketing research, marketing analytics and entrepreneurial marketing. Employers of our Graduates Bose Corporation Chicago Cubs Condé Nast ESPN Gap, Inc. GE Golub Corporation IBM KPMG LinkedIn The Madison Square Garden Company Mattel MetLife Stadium NBCUniversal Nestlé New York Mets Northwestern Mutual Notre Dame PepsiCo Saks Fifth Avenue Sony St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital The Travelers Companies, Inc. UPS Verizon Internship Sites Albany Broadcasting Company BBL Construction Services GE GlobalFoundries IBM KPMG Merrill Lynch NBC Nestlé New Jersey Nets Nielsen Company Price Chopper Pfizer SiriusXM Satellite Radio Special Olympics New York Target The Metropolitan Museum of Art Tri-City Valley Cats Job Titles of Recent Graduates Brand Manager Consultant Demographic Research Analyst Digital Communications Coordinator Digital Engagement Specialist Digital Media Planner Director of Product Development International Sales Manager Manager Market Analyst Media Specialist National Accounts Manager Product Marketing Manager Project Coordinator Promotion and Marketing Manager Research Analyst Senior Marketing Coordinator [-]

B.S. in Mathematics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

A strong foundation in mathematics provides the effective thinking and communication skills needed to succeed in any technical endeavor. Whether it is the physical or social sciences, education, law, business, medicine or government, a math degree will take you anywhere. [+]

A strong foundation in mathematics provides the effective thinking and communication skills needed to succeed in any technical endeavor. Whether it is the physical or social sciences, education, law, business, medicine or government, a math degree will take you anywhere. At Siena, mathematics majors have learning experiences that extend far beyond the classroom. Our students attend and present at national math conferences. They get accepted to programs and internships sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the American Mathematical Association, and The George Washington University. They conduct research with professors. And they enroll in semester-long math programs at Penn State and Smith College, and in Moscow and Budapest. ​Math Education at Siena Siena’s math education program is a regional leader in mathematics education. Nearly 100 percent of our math alumni are employed as math teachers. In our math education program, you will major in mathematics and earn New York State Secondary Teaching Certification in mathematics. Our program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education—the gold standard for teacher preparation. Program Highlights Faculty are dedicated to teaching and advising undergraduate students and they carefully advise students on both their academic experience and future careers. Students develop creative, critical thinking and technical communication skills in an active, supportive classroom environment. In class, students wrestle with new concepts, present their ideas to their peers and work together to tackle complex problems. Faculty publish articles in well-respected research journals and are invited speakers at national and international conferences. By staying active in cutting-edge research, they are able to develop courses that build strength in the current active areas of mathematics. Through summer research experiences, students acquire mathematical maturity and problem solving skills valued in the workplace and by graduate programs. They speak on their work at regional and national conferences and publish in research journals. Four courses have a lab component in which students explore mathematics in an activity-rich, collaborative environment. Upper level mathematics courses typically have an enrollment cap of 16 students so that faculty can craft courses that fit the needs of each student. Requirements for the Major (37 cr.) MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. MATH191 - Mathematical Problem Solving 1 cr. MATH210 - Calculus III 4 cr. MATH230 - Linear Algebra 3 cr. MATH301 - Foundations of Mathematics 3 cr. MATH310 - Intro to Modern Algebra 3 cr. MATH320 - Mathematical Analysis 3 cr. AND Students must complete twelve credits of Mathematics electives, with at least three classes between MATH325 and MATH499 (12 cr.) Auxiliary courses (23 cr.) CSIS110 - Intro to Computer Science 3 cr. CSIS120 - Intro to Programming 4 cr. PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. AND Students must successfully complete the requirements for a minor or major in biology, chemistry, physics or computer science. OR Students must successfully complete 9 additional credits in biology, chemistry, physics, or computer science that count for the degree in that major. Of these 9 credits, students must successfully complete 6 credits from one of the following sequences: PHYS 250, 310, 320, 410 or 440 OR CHEM 310 and 320 OR CSIS 310 and 385 Math Education Program Highlights Even in a difficult education market, almost 100% of graduates are employed as math teachers. Over the last 30 years approximately 200 of our mathematics majors have become secondary mathematics educators. While 50% of new teachers quit the teaching profession in their first five years, over 90% of Siena’s math graduates are still teaching. When one of our students arrived at a school to work with her cooperating teacher she was told: “You’re from Siena so you must be good.” Our mathematics students student-teach in almost every school system within 25 miles of campus. The Association of Mathematics Teachers of New York State awards four scholarships per year to the most promising new mathematics teachers from 75 New York colleges and universities. Siena students have been awarded 5 out of the last 70 scholarships. The college’s education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the teaching profession’s gold standard in establishing high quality teacher preparation. What our Students Say “Doing math research has been an eye-opening experience to all of the opportunities a career in math has to offer. Six weeks of research has given me more problem solving skills than sitting in a classroom for four years would, and these skills are applicable to all kinds of situations. Because of the research I did, I am now determined to go on and receive my Ph.D. in mathematics.” - Francesca Romano ‘14 “While interviewing at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, my interviewer was very interested in my independent research project. My math background taught me to be disciplined in my work ethic and quickly assess if an approach to solving a problem will work. These skills are invaluable in my line of work and really gave me an advantage over the other candidates.” - Matt Farrelly ‘08 “This experience was an irreplaceable glimpse into what graduate research entails. Fully analyzing an open problem to find new approaches was a completely new concept to me. Now that I am applying to graduate schools, it is very helpful to have already worked with faculty on research, written and published a paper, and presented my results. I also traveled to Shanghai, China with Dr. Bannon to attend a mathematics conference!” - Maureen Jeffery ‘13 “Not only did my summer research experience clarify and enhance my understanding of number theory and other areas of math by allowing me to think critically on problems that I thought were interesting outside of the classroom setting, but it also gave me skills valuable for any career path. These skills include the ability to read and understand complex papers and the ability to communicate clearly ideas and results in both written word and oral presentation.” -Lindsay Kulzer ‘12 Employers/Graduate Schools of our Graduates CommerceHub Knolls Atomic Power Labs SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Syracuse University [-]

B.S. in Physics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena's physics degree focuses on active student participation in cutting-edge research. This hands-on experience, in addition to a demanding curriculum, teaches you how to think critically and prepares you for exciting careers in a broad range of fields. [+]

Siena's physics degree focuses on active student participation in cutting-edge research. This hands-on experience, in addition to a demanding curriculum, teaches you how to think critically and prepares you for exciting careers in a broad range of fields. Program Highlights Undergraduate research Small class sizes Dynamic, growing department Commitment to exploring new and effective pedagogical techniques Accessible faculty Student travel (Puerto Rico, China, Greenland and more) Access to computational cluster Interdisciplinary work in biophysics, electrical engineering and astrochemistry Requirements for the Major PHYS130 - General Physics I 4 cr. PHYS140 - General Physics II 4 cr. PHYS220 - Modern Physics 4 cr. PHYS250 - Intro to Computational Physics 3 cr. PHYS260 - Thermal Physics 3 cr. PHYS470 - Advanced Laboratory I 1 TO 3 cr. PHYS472 - Advanced Laboratory II 1 TO 2 cr. AND PHYS370 - Experimental Techniques 2 cr. OR PHYS380 - Observational Astronomy 3 cr. AND And students must complete 4 additional advanced courses (numbered 300 and above). Courses must total at least 13 credits. At least two of the courses must come from the following: PHYS310 - Mechanics I 4 cr. PHYS410 - Electromagnetic Theory I 4 cr. PHYS440 - Quantum Physics 3 cr. Auxiliary courses (32 cr.) CHEM110 - General Chemistry 1 4 cr. MATH110 - Calculus I 4 cr. MATH120 - Calculus II 4 cr. MATH210 - Calculus III 4 cr. MATH325 - Differential Equations 3 cr. MATH330 - Intro to Applied Mathematics I 3 cr. SCDV230 - Electronic Instrumentation 4 cr. AND MATH230 - Linear Algebra 3 cr. OR MATH430 - Intro to Applied Math II 3 cr. AND One Computer Science Course, CSIS 110 or higher (3 cr.) Transfer students from two-year colleges may receive credit for General Physics I, II, Modern Physics, Thermal Physics, Calculus I, II, III, Differential Equations, General Chemistry I and General Chemistry II. Pre-engineering students are advised to take General Physics I and II in the freshman year. Success Stats 100% of recent graduates are employed or in graduate school 100% of students participate in an independent study or research project and 80% of students have received paid summer research internships $4 million in active research grants was secured by the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Department of Defense and Department of Energy The freshman retention rate is 94% Skills Developed Understanding of the fundamental concepts and theories of physics. Strong analytical skills and facility with mathematical modeling. Demonstrated ability with laboratory equipment and techniques including computers as analytical and experimental tools. Ability to analyze and interpret experimental data, and assess the statistical significance of results. Aptitude for researching and clearly expressing scientific ideas using oral, visual and written communication. Ability to evaluate the quality of scientific information. Competence in designing, planning and conducting an independent research project. Familiarity with the historical development of physics. Recent Employers of our Graduates General Dynamics GE GlobalFoundries IBM Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory NASA Plug Power Sematech Southwest Research Institute SuperPower Inc. Unique Technical Services U.S. Air Force U.S. Army X-Ray Optical Systems Zoetis Pharmaceutical Internships Sites Jet Propulsion Laboratory American Museum of Natural History University of Vermont University of Colorado, Boulder Northern Arizona University Sematech X-Ray Optical Systems Where our Alumni Go to Graduate School Boston University Dartmouth College Duke University East Caroline University Hofstra University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute San Francisco State University Stanford University SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Temple University University of Connecticut University of Maryland University of Pennsylvania University of Washington Job Titles of Recent Graduates Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer Engineer Medical Physicist Physician (MD) Physics Teacher Project Manager Quality Control Technician Research Assistant Science Writer [-]

BA

B.A. in American Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena's American Studies program allows the inquisitive student to explore the United States through a multitude of disciplines such as history, literature, art, sociology, political science, religion, gender and multicultural studies. American Studies majors are diverse thinkers who often combine this flexible major with study abroad, Pre-Law, certificate programs, minors or another major. f [+]

Siena's American Studies program allows the inquisitive student to explore the United States through a multitude of disciplines such as history, literature, art, sociology, political science, religion, gender and multicultural studies. American Studies majors are diverse thinkers who often combine this flexible major with study abroad, Pre-Law, certificate programs, minors or another major. Program Highlights Small class sizes guarantee that students will work closely with faculty, and enjoy maximum flexibility and opportunity. A special connection with the American Studies program at Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Albany’s sister city), brings Dutch students to Siena and sends Siena students to the Netherlands. The McCormick Center for the Study of the American Revolution gives Siena American Studies majors access to internships and opportunities unique to our campus and our region. A focus on service learning and community engagement gives students valuable skills and contacts through their regular academic program and beyond. Opportunities to work alongside active historians as assistants, gaining experience with artifacts, documents and pedagogical techniques. Internship placements throughout the historically rich Capital Region give students hands-on experience at sites of local, regional and national importance. Senior capstone experience. Requirements for the Major (39 cr.) HIST203 - American History I 3 cr. HIST204 - American History II 3 cr. AMST250 - The American Dream 3 cr. AMST451 - American Studies Capstone 3 cr. 6 credits in American Literature (LTAM) The remaining 21 credits in American Studies must be chosen from Areas A, B, and C, with no less than 6 and no more than 12 credit hours in each area. The Areas are: Area A - Courses with AMSA attribute AMST485 - Topics:Revoltionary Era 3 cr. HIST310 - Colonial-Revolut US 1600-1789 3 cr. HIST311 - North Amer colonies 1492-1763 3 cr. HIST312 - Amer Rev Atlantic World 3 cr. HIST313 - Antebellum America 1815-1854 3 cr. HIST315 - Civil War and Reconstruction 3 cr. HIST320 - Industrial America 1877-1920 3 cr. HIST323 - Contemporary America 3 cr. HIST325 - U S Women's History 3 cr. HIST327 - New York State History 3 cr. HIST401 - Colloquium in History: Topics 3 cr. HIST451 - US Soc and Cult Hist to 1877 3 cr. HIST453 - US Soc and Cult Hist post 1877 3 cr. HIST455 - Westward Movement-1750-1890 3 cr. HIST457 - Amer Immigr in Hist Perspectve 3 cr. HIST461 - African-American History 3 cr. HIST463 - US Military History 3 cr. HIST465 - Spanish Borderlands 3 cr. HIST390 - Honors Seminar 3 cr. HIST490 - Honors Seminar 3 cr. Area B - Courses with AMSB attribute ECON230 - U.S. Economic History 3 cr. POSC100 - Contemporary U.S. Politics 3 cr. POSC205 - State and Local Government 3 cr. POSC305 - Metropolitan Government 3 cr. POSC313 - American Political Parties 3 cr. POSC315 - U.S. Congress 3 cr. POSC320 - American Presidency 3 cr. POSC329 - Spec Studies in Amer Politics 1 TO 3 cr. POSC351 - U.S. Foreign Policy 3 cr. POSC370 - Civil Liberties I 3 cr. POSC372 - Civil Liberties II 3 cr. SOCI120 - Global Social Problems 3 cr. SOCI130 - The Family 3 cr. SOCI150 - American Indians 3 cr. SOCI210 - Race and Ethnic Relations 3 cr. Area C - Courses with AMSC attribute ATDV105 - Topics in Film 3 cr. CREA255 - American Art 3 cr. CREA256 - American Music 3 cr. CREA240 - American Theatre 3 cr. EDUC220 - Democracy-Pluralism Amer Ed 3 cr. ENGL213 - Survey of American Literature 3 cr. ENGL345 - Early Amer Lit 1500 1820 3 cr. ENGL350 - Amer Renaissance 1820 1865 3 cr. ENGL355 - Realistic Movement in Amer Lit 3 cr. ENGL360 - American Lit of the Jazz Age 3 cr. ENGL368 - Lit of the War in Vietnam 3 cr. ENGL370 - African American Literature 3 cr. ENGL372 - Native American Literature 3 cr. ENGL374 - Asian - American Literature 3 cr. ENGL376 - Latinola Literature 3 cr. PHIL420 - Classic American Philosophy 3 cr. RELG305 - Religion in America 3 cr. RELG310 - American Evangelical Tradition 3 cr. RELG315 - American Catholicism Auxiliary Courses (6 cr.) Two semesters in the same foreign language These languages include: French, Spanish, German, Latin, Russian, Greek, Italian, or Arabic. American Sign Language does not fulfill this requirement. Skills Developed According to the American Studies Association, “the greatest value of the American Studies major is diverse thinking. In no other curriculum is the student offered such a wide exposure to thinking and scholarship in so many areas.” American Studies majors know how to weigh a variety of evidence, whether visual, literary, historical, or statistical, and how to evaluate it for validity and perspective. Exposed to a wide range of methods, they are uniquely equipped to consider which tools are best for gathering, interpreting, and sharing information, fitting them for a wide variety of careers. Employers of our Graduates ABC News CenturyLink (Carlisle, PA) Children’s Village (Nanuet, NY) Fort Ticonderoga GE Oil & Gas History Press Maple Leaf Realty Parsons Family and Child Center Siena College U.S. Army U.S. House of Representatives U.S. Marine Corps Internship Sites Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (through the McCormick Center’s William & Mary semester). ABC (Good Morning America) Grant Cottage State Historic Site New York State Military Museum and Veteran’s Research Center NBC [-]

B.A. in Classics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The study of our classical heritage from the Greeks and the Romans is not only exciting, it gives students the tools that will help them succeed in a wide range of future careers. Classics incorporates practically every aspect and discipline of the liberal arts tradition: history, literature, religion, philosophy, art, culture and language. [+]

The study of our classical heritage from the Greeks and the Romans is not only exciting, it gives students the tools that will help them succeed in a wide range of future careers. Classics incorporates practically every aspect and discipline of the liberal arts tradition: history, literature, religion, philosophy, art, culture and language. The major in Classics strives to involve students in an investigation into the foundations of Western Civilization, which are to be discovered in our Greco-Roman heritage. Without the broad perspective that a solid grounding in the origins of Western culture provides, we, as inheritors of that tradition, cannot meaningfully engage in an intelligent dialogue with other cultures and attitudes. Unique among the liberal arts in the breadth of its historical and cultural scope, the study of Classics embraces over two millennia of history, beginning with the splendid early achievements of the Minoan-Mycenaean Age in Greece and ending with the decadence and decay of the Roman Empire, as the West moved into the Middle Ages. There is no a significant aspect of the political arts that was not experienced in antiquity. To study the literature of the ancient world is to sit at a great banquet and taste the philosophical profundity of Plato and Aristotle, the archetypal epics of Homer and Vergil, the historical inquiries of Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, and Tacitus, the sparkling comedies of Aristophanes, Plautus, and Terence, the sublime lyrics of Sappho and Catullus, and the eternal tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. There is hardly a literary genre that was not first given form by the Greeks and Romans. The remarkable achievements in ancient sculpture, painting, and architecture can be explored through the study of Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology. Greek and Roman Mythology has been perhaps the most pervasive of all influences upon the literature and art of Western Civilization. We take great pleasure in allowing students to discover for themselves how the creative, artistic, and intellectual life of the Ancients has given inspiration to and influenced our own culture. Classics provides a solid liberal arts background and offers one of the best possible foundations for a variety of future careers. Program Highlights Opportunity to study all aspects of the classical past, including Greek and Latin literature, Greek and Roman history, philosophy, myth and religion, art, and archaeology, and of course both Latin and Greek. Travel Study courses to Italy, Greece, Turkey, France and the Netherlands, to name just a few. Archaeology classes taught by a field archaeologist. Requirements for the Major (36 cr.) 24 credits in Classics Either 12 credits in Greek OR 12 credits in Latin Students who plan to enter graduate study in Classics are advised to take additional courses in the second of the classical languages. For students planning an advanced degree it is also recommended that they begin the study of French and/or German. Skills Developed Creative thinking Problem solving Advanced language skills Advanced writing skills Critical thinking Cultural literacy Leadership skills Presentation skills Teaching methods Managing complex projects Communicating with confidence Making informed decisions Curiosity across a range of interests Self confidence to pursue any goal Research skills Logic argumentation Persuasive presentations Employers of our Graduates Doctored Apps Georgetown University The Cheese Traveler Durham University The College of Saint Rose AmeriCorps [-]

B.A. in History

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

History majors at Siena College experience history. We require it. Siena students conduct research in archives, record oral histories, intern at museums, travel to historic sites and work with active scholars. Our rigorous program empowers our graduates in business, law, government, education and public history in the U.S. and abroad. [+]

History majors at Siena College experience history. We require it. Siena students conduct research in archives, record oral histories, intern at museums, travel to historic sites and work with active scholars. Our rigorous program empowers our graduates in business, law, government, education and public history in the U.S. and abroad. Why study history? History helps us understand the past so we can explain the present and gain insights into the future. History enables us to make sense of a complex world and provides us with a sense of identity. And history trains us to reason and weigh evidence, to consider multiple interpretations, and to forward our own ideas with vigor, precision, and confidence. Why study history at Siena? At Siena, your education isn’t confined to the classroom—it happens in museums and libraries. It happens at historic sites here and abroad. It happens in the real world, with plenty of real-world experience along the way. Here, you have immediate access to active scholars and professionals, historic documents, recordings, and artifacts. And you’ll be trained to discover—and make sense of—important historical resources. Program Highlights Small classes Personalized advising Tracks in American History, European History, Non-Western History and Social Studies Education Students complete a “History Outside the Classroom” requirement through mini-internships, teaching or study abroad Service-learning opportunities abound, from engaging with local refugee immigrant communities to assisting historic sites through original research Certificate programs in Revolutionary Era Studies and Latin American/Caribbean Studies Innovative capstone requirement noted by the American Historical Association has led to awards, published research and helped graduates get into graduate and law schools Award-winning chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honor society Active history club that sponsors trips and a “Day of Living History” on campus Undergraduate opportunities to work as research assistants with active scholars Internships where students enjoy hands-on experience in sites of local, regional and national importance Summer Scholars work alongside active historians as assistants, gaining hands-on experience with artifacts, documents and pedagogical techniques A foreign language requirement and frequently offered travel courses to destinations like Italy, the Netherlands and Russia Requirements for the Major (39 cr.) HIST101 - Shaping of Contemporary World 3 cr. OR HIST190 - Honors: Contemp World History 3 cr. AND HIST110 - History Outside the Classroom 0 cr. HIST201 - West and World I 3 cr. HIST202 - West and World II 3 cr. HIST203 - American History I 3 cr. HIST204 - American History II 3 cr. * Students may opt out of HIST- 201, 202 sequence, and replace those courses with 6 hours in European or non-European/ non-U.S. history above 200 level (HEUR and HNW attributes); or, they may opt out of HIST- 203, 204 sequence, and replace those courses with 6 hours of U.S. history above 200 level (HAM attributes). Students must take at least one of the sequences, HIST-201 AND HIST-202 OR HIST-203 AND HIST-204, but can choose to take both sequences. Students should consult with their advisor on their course selection. HIST497 - Proseminar for Capstone 3 cr. The course normally is taken the semester preceding enrollment in HIST 499 in the senior year. It cannot be taken concurrently with HIST 499. HIST499 - History Capstone 3 cr. 6 credits in European history (HEUR) AND 6 credits in non-European/non-U.S. history (HNW) AND 6 credits in History electives Auxiliary courses (6 cr.) Two semesters in the same foreign language These languages include: French, Spanish, German, Latin, Russian, Greek, Italian or Arabic. *American Sign Language does not fulfill this requirement. Success Stats 100% of students gain hands-on experience with history outside the classroom 97% job or graduate school placement rate 40% go on to earn a master’s doctorate or professional degree One in three say a Siena connection led to their first or current job 44% participate in internships Employers of our Graduates and Student Internship Sites Albany Institute of History and Art Antietam National Battlefield Apple Autotask Discovery Communications Irish-American Heritage Museum New York State Assembly New York State Department of Labor New York State Military Museum and Veteran’s Research Center New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation New York State Senate Saratoga National Historical Park Shaker Heritage Society Syracuse City School District U.S. Air Force U.S. Department of Education U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Walt Disney Co. Wells Fargo Job Titles of Recent Graduates Analyst Assignment Editor Associate Director Assistant District Attorney Attorney Branch Manager Historic Site Interpreter Legislative Assistant Marketing Executive Teacher [-]

B.A. in Philosophy

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Philosophy teaches students to think clearly and critically about the most important questions of life. We explore not only how things are, but also how they could have been and how they ought to be. Philosophy majors and minors routinely score high on all standardized tests and go on to successful careers in business, education, government, law, medicine and public policy. [+]

Are you the type who likes to question authority? Ever wonder whether the script of your life has already been written? Is an afterlife compatible with modern science? Philosophy is a discipline having two hearts: one is to encourage reasoned and critical thinking; the other is to explore the nature of goodness and living well as humans. Thus a student of philosophy has the ability to tackle any job or career that prizes reasoned and ethical interpretative skills, as well as the ability to create text and discourse; that is, philosophy majors are highly flexible and employable. Our department explores contemporary philosophical questions through the lens of the history of philosophy. We have broad research and teaching interests in the Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Modern Philosophy, and a variety of topics in American Pragmatism, Analytic Philosophy, and Continental Philosophy. We are home to the Symposium of Living Philosophers - a unique undergraduate educational experience, where students have the opportunity to take a yearlong seminar on the work of one of the central figures in contemporary philosophy. Students have the opportunity to work directly with the featured philosopher, as well as with a variety of guest lecturers from universities around the country. Featured philosophers have included: Richard Rorty, Michael Walzer, John Caputo, Anthony Appiah, and Judith Butler. Our students achieve an understanding of the central figures and texts in the history of philosophy, the four traditional theories of ethics together with an understanding of the nature of justice, and the formal techniques used to evaluate arguments. They are taught to carefully read, comprehend and compress written material, to compare and contrast a range of positions on a given topic, to defend a specific position on a topic, and to write clearly and in an organized fashion. And they develop the ability to apply philosophical positions and arguments to other academic disciplines and to matters of public interest. ​Program Highlights Exploration of contemporary philosophical questions through the lens of the history of philosophy. Students achieve an understanding of the central figures and texts in the history of philosophy, the four traditional theories of ethics together with an understanding of the nature of justice, and the formal techniques used to evaluate arguments. A focus on teaching students to carefully read, comprehend and compress written material, to compare and contrast a range of positions on a given topic, to defend a specific position on a topic and to write clearly and in an organized fashion. Development of the ability to apply philosophical positions and arguments to other academic disciplines and to matters of public interest. Faculty with broad research and teaching interests in the Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Modern Philosophy, a variety of topics in American Pragmatism, Analytic Philosophy and Continental Philosophy. Home to the Symposium of Living Philosophers, a unique undergraduate educational experience where students have the opportunity to take a yearlong seminar on the work of one of the central figures in contemporary philosophy. Students then work directly with the featured philosopher, as well a variety of guest lecturers from universities around the country. Featured philosophers have included: Richard Rorty, Michael Walzer, John Caputo, Anthony Appiah and Judith Butler. Requirements for the Major (33 cr.) Choose one of the following (Only one of these may count towards the major.) PHIL101 - Philosophy and the Human Being 3 cr. OR PHIL103 - Reason and Argument 3 cr. AND PHIL155 - Symbolic Logic 3 cr. PHIL210 - Ethics 3 cr. PHIL290 - Greek and Roman Philosophy 3 cr. PHIL294 - Early Modern Philosophy 3 cr. AND One History of Philosophy course (3 cr.) from PHIL342 - Medieval Philosophy 3 cr. PHIL346 - Late Modern Philosophy 3 cr. PHIL348 - Existentialism 3 cr. PHIL350 - Phil Influences on Theology 3 cr. PHIL400 - Philosophy of Language + Mind 3 cr. PHIL420 - Classic American Philosophy 3 cr. PHIL440 - Contemp Continental Philosophy 3 cr. AND PHIL450 - Great Figures in Philosophy 3 cr. AND a Philosophy Seminar PHIL490 - Seminar in Philosophy 3 cr. OR PHIL491 - Symposium Living Philosophers 3 cr. If the student chooses the PHIL 491 Seminar, it must be taken for two semesters. The student earns three credits per semester, six total over the one year Philosophy electives (9 cr.) Electives should be chosen in consultation with departmental advisor. Recent Graduate/Professional Schools Albany Law School Albany Medical School MA Program in Environmental Policy, Lehigh University MA Program in Philosophy, Boston College MA Program in Philosophy, Colorado State University Washington & Lee University School of Law [-]

B.A. in Psychology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Siena's psychology program prepares students for entry into graduate programs and/or careers in academic and professional psychology. It also provides an excellent background for entry into fields such as law, business and the health professions. [+]

Siena's psychology program prepares students for entry into graduate programs and/or careers in academic and professional psychology. It also provides an excellent background for entry into fields such as law, business and the health professions. Siena’s psychology program focuses on skill development necessary for careers in the helping and health professions. Here, you’ll develop strong critical thinking, scientific reasoning, communication, and micro-counseling skills, as well as experience in research and data analysis. Studying psychology at Siena As a psychology major at Siena, you’ll take a wide range of courses in child, adolescent, and adult psychology, as well as courses in personality, abnormal and physiological psychology, perception, testing, and research methods. You’ll also get plenty of hands-on experience in laboratories and internships, as well as through independent research and opportunities to collaborate on faculty research. Our psychology faculty At Siena, you’ll learn from faculty who are experts in their field. Their expertise spans the spectrum from clinical and counseling psychology to cognitive, experimental, and school psychology. Our professors are also active in research interests that include romantic relationships, bullying and school violence, health psychology, and stereotypes and prejudice. Life after Siena Siena’s psychology graduates have had considerable success in competitive graduate programs, including those at the University of Connecticut, Seton Hall University, St. John’s University, SUNY Albany, and Lehigh University. Our alumni also have launched successful careers in psychology practices, counseling centers, human resources departments, colleges, and school systems. "I loved the interactive psychology professors and enjoyed the conversations we had because they cared about our opinions and thoughts." Ellen Lowndes '13 ​Program Highlights Faculty with expertise in a variety of psychology fields including clinical, counseling, cognitive, social and school psychology. Critical skill development, including: Critical thinking, scientific reasoning, information literacy, written communication, oral communication, microcounseling skills, empirical research method, as well as data analysis and interpretation. Students may opt to complete independent research via our advanced research class or by completing an honors thesis. Requirements for the Major (31 cr.) PSYC100 - General Psychology 3 cr. PSYC260 - Social Psychology 3 cr. PSYC300 - Research Methods in Psych I 4 cr. AND PSYC200 - Child Psychology 3 cr. OR PSYC205 - Adolescent Psychology 3 cr. OR PSYC210 - Adult Development 3 cr. AND PSYC215 - Theories of Personality 3 cr. OR PSYC220 - Abnormal Psychology 3 cr. AND PSYC240 - Learning 3 cr. OR PSYC340 - Human Cognition 3 cr. AND PSYC350 - Physiological Psychology 3 cr. OR PSYC355 - Sensation and Perception 3 cr. AND PSYC310 - Tests and Measurements 3 cr. OR PSYC400 - Research Methods in Psych II 3 cr. OR PSYC490 - Seminar in Psychology 3 cr. Psychology electives ( 6 cr.) Auxiliary courses (7 cr.) ATDV110 - Statistics for Social Science 3 cr. BIOL140 - Gen Biology for Social Sci 4 cr. Courses in Computer Science and the other social sciences are recommended. Students who plan to attend graduate programs are strongly encouraged to take Research Methods in Psychology II (PSYC—400). Psychology majors are encouraged to work closely with their faculty advisor in planning academic programs consistent with their interests and career goals. Success Stats The freshman retention rate is 91% For the Class of 2013, 100% of graduates are employed or in graduate school One in three psychology students participate in an internship Only 1% of undergraduate psychology programs have a nationally certified school psychologist on the faculty… and Siena is one of them! Employers of our Graduates and Student Internship Sites Aeropostale Albany Leadership Charter High School for Girls Behavioral Health Recovery Center CDPHP Center for Child Study Children’s Hospital Colorado Coolidge Unified School District Ellis Medicine Equinox Domestic Violence Services Fortitude Sport Psychology Counseling Hope House, St. Mary’s Promise Program Human Resources Associates Keller Williams Leukemia and Lymphoma Society National Alliance on Mental Illness New York City Department of Education New York State Society of Orthopedic Surgeons North Colonie Central School District Northeast Parent and Child Society Parsons Child and Family Center Where our Alumni Get Graduate Degrees Boston University Columbia University Ithaca College New York University North Carolina State University Northeastern University Pace University St. John’s University University of Connecticut University of Maryland University of Massachusetts University of Pittsburgh Job Titles of Recent Graduates Actor Analyst Attorney Behavioral Health Case Manager Business Analyst Campaign Manager Chemical Dependency Counselor Executive Director Human Resource Manager Producer Owner Realtor Registered Nurse School Counselor School Psychologist Social Worker Speech and Language Pathologist Teacher [-]

B.A. in Religious Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The Religious Studies Department gives all students at Siena College a general knowledge of religion in the modern world, and offers a major and minor to those desiring a career or more in-depth study in religion. [+]

Studying the world's religions is a central part of understanding human cultures. Religions shape how human beings interpret and interact with other humans, with nature, and with what we take to be most sacred. If you find human beings interesting, you'll find studying the world's religions interesting. The principal mission of the Religious Studies Department is to help students at Siena understand and appreciate the meanings and roles of religion in human culture. The academic investigation of religion is a component of a liberal arts education and clearly has an important function at a college sustained by the Franciscan tradition. The Department presents in its courses a critical study and appreciation of the various religious traditions of the world. Through this approach to Religious Studies, the Department provides students with an opportunity to explore the significance of human existence in its relation to the sacred, and alerts them to the importance of religious beliefs and practices in the political, social, aesthetic, and economic arenas. Our courses are designed for all students, regardless of their personal religious stance, and approach religious experience from cross-cultural, multidisciplinary and global perspectives. Siena’s Religious Studies Department seeks not to persuade students to become religious or to adhere to one religion rather than another. We explore the historical and contemporary diversity of the world’s religions, helping students better understand the roles religions play in society, in politics, in the arts, and in economics. ​ Program Highlights Fieldwork that allows students to learn firsthand about the experiences of local religious persons. A focus on improving our students’ abilities to analyze complex arguments and to articulate and defend reasoned responses to them. Students develop marketable skills such as communicating ideas clearly, listening carefully, valuing teamwork and appreciating the impact of beliefs and practices others typically take for granted. Internationally recognized faculty experts with degrees from top U.S. universities. Preparation for a wide-variety of career paths, including teaching, social service, counseling, various forms of ministry, law, medicine and business. Requirements for the Major (36 cr.) RELG101 - Religion in Western Culture 3 cr. OR RELG121 - Intro to Biblical Studies 3 cr. OR RELG141 - Intro to Religious Thought 3 cr. OR RELG181 - Experiences of the Sacred 3 cr. Historical Studies (RSHS) (3 cr.) Scriptural Studies (RSSC) (3 cr.) Religious Thought (RSRT) ( 3cr.) Ethics (RSET) ( 3cr.) World Religions (RSWR) ( 3cr.) AND RELG490 - Seminar in Religious Studies 3 cr. Religious Studies Electives (15 cr.) *INSA 400 and INSA 480 may be counted as elective Religion credits by Religious Studies majors. Students are encouraged to take advantage of religious studies course offerings in the Hudson-Mohawk Association of Colleges. Auxiliary courses (6 cr.) Two semesters in the same foreign language. These languages include: French, Spanish, German, Latin, Russian, Greek, Italian or Arabic. *American Sign Language does not fulfill this requirement. [-]

B.A. in Social Work

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Do you desire to make a difference in the world through helping others? Siena's social work program provides the knowledge, skills and values necessary for a professional career in social work. [+]

Are you a good listener, find that friends seek your support and advice? Do you want to make a difference in the world by helping people with their problems? Are you interested in human rights and social justice? Would you like a professional career? If “yes,” you may want to consider studying social work. Baccalaureate Social Work (BSW) education equips students with the knowledge, skills, and values for a professional helping career in a variety of settings (schools, hospitals, poverty programs, addiction services, shelters, etc). Employers recognize BSW graduates as entry level professionals MSW grad schools offer advanced standing options to those from an accredited BSW program, earning a Master's Degree in Social Work in less than 2 years! Siena' s BSW Program has been accredited since 1985 Program Highlights Nationally accredited since 1985. Department has a leadership role with the New York State Social Work Education Association. Emphasis on both classroom and hand-on experiences. 450-hour internship requirement in professionally supervised sites matching students’ interests. Example settings include schools, nursing homes, probation offices, programs serving homelessness, domestic violence shelters and mental health settings. Focus on the development of communication skills and understanding of social problems necessary to become a professional interviewer and community change agent. Hands-on experience working with individuals, families, groups and communities to solve problems. Preparation for social work careers in diverse settings such as hospitals, family service agencies, domestic violence programs and more immediately after graduation. Preparation for Master’s in Social Work programs. Requirements for the Major (37 cr.) SWRK100 - Intro Soc Welfare and Soc Work 3 cr. SWRK200 - Social Work Practice Skills 3 cr. SWRK300 - Human Bhvr and the Soc Envir I 3 cr. SWRK310 - Human Bhvr and Social Envir II 3 cr. SWRK315 - Social Wk Pract W Orgs & Comm 3 cr. SWRK320 - Social Wk Prac w Indiv and Fam 3 cr. SWRK410 - Field Education I 4 cr. SWRK415 - Social Work Practice w/Groups 3 cr. SWRK420 - Field Education II 5 cr. SWRK430 - Social Work Research 3 cr. SWRK440 - Social Welfare Policy 3 cr. SWRK491 - Child Abuse Neglect Workshop 0 cr. AND SWRK301 - Internship in Social Work 1 cr. OR PCST480 - Internship in Peace Studies 3 cr. OR INSA480 - Internshp Franciscan Serv Advo 1 TO 3 cr. Auxiliary courses (21 cr.) ATDV110 - Statistics for Social Science 3 cr. BIOL025 - Human Biology 3 cr. PSYC100 - General Psychology 3 cr. SOCI101 - The Sociological Perspective 3 cr. AND PSYC220 - Abnormal Psychology 3 cr. OR PSYC340 - Human Cognition 3 cr. OR PSYC350 - Physiological Psychology 3 cr. AND ECON101 - Principles of Economics,Micro 3 cr. OR ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. AND POSC100 - Contemporary U.S. Politics 3 cr. OR POSC130 - Political Theory 3 cr. OR POSC140 - Comparative Politics 3 cr. OR POSC150 - World Politics 3 cr. OR POSC205 - State and Local Government 3 cr. Students must achieve and maintain a minimum social work major GPA of 2. 7 for required SWRK courses following admission into the Social Work Program (i.e. Junior and Senior level courses). Any student who falls below a 2. 7 major GPA for the required SWRK courses at any point following formal admission into the program will be terminated from the program and required to declare another major. (The gap between the current major GPA and the required 2.7 GPA as well as any extenuating circumstances will be evaluated on a case by case basis according to the program's review process.) Internship Sites Albany County Dept of Children, Youth, and Families Albany Medical Center Hospital Alzheimer’s Association Guilderland Elementary School Joseph’s House & Shelter Parsons Child and Family Center Rensselaer County Probation Samaritan Hospital Mental Health Clinic Troy High School Unity House Domestic Violence Program [-]

B.A. in Sociology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Are you looking for a socially relevant liberal arts discipline that opens your career options in the field of: Non-Profit, Education, Public Policy, Law, Law Enforcement, Social Work, Government, Business, and Administration? Are you looking for analytical skills to develop socially relevant knowledge from the vast amount of information available around you? Then Sociology is the subject for you! [+]

Sociology addresses the most challenging matters facing society today. If you desire to better understand the complex social forces that affect people’s lives, as well as to become engaged in the study of and solutions to these issues, sociology is the place for you. The sociological perspective is both intellectually rewarding and practically useful for future career paths. If you want both an involved understanding and a set of practical skills to address these issues, then Sociology is the subject for you! Are you looking for a socially relevant liberal arts discipline that opens your career options in the field of: Non-Profit, Education, Public Policy, Law, Law Enforcement, Social Work, Government, Business, and Administration? Are you looking for analytical skills to develop socially relevant knowledge from the vast amount of information available around you? Then Sociology is the subject for you! Program Highlights Franciscan perspectives on social justice, human rights and civic engagement. Civic-oriented travel courses to places such as Mississippi, Maine, Canada, Brazil, Thailand, Bolivia and Scotland. Diverse faculty expertise, including: the Civil Rights Movement, health and aging, criminology, immigration, labor migration, civic engagement, media studies and subcultures. Applied media studies courses where students learn new technology, including photography, documentary film and visual sociology tools. Ability to participate in annual sociology student symposium. Students and faculty attend sociology conferences together. Project and team-based learning. Senior capstone course. Service learning programs, volunteer work and internships. Preparation for careers in community and social services, administrative support/management, program coordinators/human resources, criminal Justice and law enforcement, education, government, research, marketing and the nonprofit sector. Requirements for the Major (36 cr.) SOCI101 - The Sociological Perspective 3 cr. OR SOCI120 - Global Social Problems 3 cr. OR SOCI130 - The Family 3 cr. AND SOCI304 - Research Methods I 3 cr. SOCI306 - Research Methods II 3 cr. SOCI390 - Social Theory Seminar 3 cr. SOCI490 - Seminar in Sociology 3 cr. SOCI495 - Senior Capstone Thesis 3 cr. Four courses with a SGLB attribute (12 cr.) Sociology Electives (6 cr.) Auxiliary courses (6 cr.) ECON102 - Principles of Economics,Macro 3 cr. AND ATDV110 - Statistics for Social Science 3 cr. OR QBUS200 - Business Statistics I 4 cr. Skills Developed Critical thinking Communication and writing Research and statistical analysis Understanding of cultural diversity Civic and social responsibility Leadership skills Computer literacy Public speaking Networking Employers of our Graduates Unity House Girls, Inc. City Year Veteran Affairs Colonie Police Department NYC Commission on Human Rights Internship Sites Commercial Investigations, Troy, NY Best Buddies New York Siena Research Institute Homeless and Travelers Aid Society, Albany Cancer Services Program, American Cancer Society St. Pius X School Siena College Athletics Department Unity House USCRI (Columbia University) South End Improvement Corporation Media Alliance [-]

B.A. in Spanish

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

A major or minor in Spanish opens the door to Hispanic and Spanish cultures, incredible travel experiences, and a language spoken by 400 million people in the world. Speaking Spanish is a marketable skill valued by employers. It creates possibilities for interacting with others in many environments such as business, healthcare and education. [+]

A major or minor in Spanish opens the door to Hispanic and Spanish cultures, incredible travel experiences, and a language spoken by 400 million people in the world. Speaking Spanish is a marketable skill valued by employers. It creates possibilities for interacting with others in many environments such as business, healthcare and education. Program Highlights Service learning opportunities: students have worked with local reading programs, pre-K schools and numerous nonprofit organizations that serve local immigrant populations. Class excursions to places such as the Williams College Museum of Art and Repertorio Español, a theater company in New York City. Travel courses to Mexico and Spain allow students to experience what they learn in the classroom firsthand. Students regularly meet and interact with invited scholars, authors and filmmakers from the Spanish-speaking world. Notable speakers include author Julia Alvarez, filmmakers Francesco Taboada Tabone and Juan Carlos Zaldívar, and Eduardo González, a scholar of Transitional Justice. Film screenings and regular tertulias are held by the Spanish Club. Opportunities for research on topics ranging from literary works to artistic movements and medical terminology Multiple study abroad programs allow our students to grow in their Spanish-speaking skills and return even more excited to study Spanish. A Facebook page, SpanishatSiena, keeps students informed of local and campus events, as well as job opportunities. Requirements for the Major (33 cr.) SPAN301 - Communication in Spanish I 3 cr. SPAN302 - Communication in Spanish II 3 cr. SPAN320 - Intro to Hispanic Literature 3 cr. SPAN340 - Advanced Grammar 3 cr. SPAN350 - Spanish Civilization 3 cr. OR SPAN360 - Spanish American Civilization 3 cr. One course which is SPAN 400 or higher and has a SPUL attribute. One course which is SPAN 400 level or higher Either SPAN 400 or SPAN with the SPUL attribute must be taken at Siena. Spanish Electives (12 cr.) Courses below Spanish 201 cannot count in the major. A study abroad experience is strongly advised (preferably a minimum of one semester during the junior year). Courses taken abroad may count toward the major. Skills Developed Ability to communicate in Spanish with confidence. General knowledge of key elements of the Spanish language (geography, family life, educational system, etc.) Awareness of key historic events related to the Spanish language. Ability to interpret texts linguistically and stylistically. Ability to analyze authentic cultural materials such as literary pieces, news broadcasts and films. Critical thinking by making intercultural connections, as well as comparing and contrasting cultures. Spanish writing skills for social, academic and professional purposes. Careers Spanish graduates are employed as elementary and secondary school teachers, writers, editors, legal aids and English teachers abroad, as well as in medical professions, travel businesses, study abroad offices and programs such as AmeriCorps and Teach for America. Many pursue graduate studies in Hispanic Studies, Latin American Studies, English as a Second Language and TESOL programs. Employers of our Graduates Albany Academies and a number of other elementary, middle and high schools North American Language and Cultural Assistants program sponsored by the Spanish Ministry of Education. Fulbright Program The College of Saint Rose Graduate Programs at multiple universities as Graduate Teaching Assistants FlipKey (A division of TripAdvisor) AmeriCorps Teach for America [-]

English Major

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

Through the careful analysis of diverse, multicultural literature and film, Siena English majors develop the skills most-prized by employers: the ability to think critically, to communicate ideas clearly to various readers and audiences, and to engage in dialogue and collaborative problem-solving techniques. [+]

Through the careful analysis of diverse, multicultural literature and film, Siena English majors develop the skills most-prized by employers: the ability to think critically, to communicate ideas clearly to various readers and audiences, and to engage in dialogue and collaborative problem-solving techniques. Why study English? As an English major, you will develop important, lifelong skills that will serve you well in any career—skills including critical thinking, effective communication, and research. You will better understand the human experience through diverse perspectives. You will learn to engage in respectful discussion and debate about historical, social, theoretical, and ethical concerns. In the process, you will sharpen your language and writing skills and expand your imagination and creativity. English at Siena Our students choose from a diverse range of courses in literature, film, criticism, writing and rhetoric, as well as special topics Honors seminars. English majors write for the college newspaper, the yearbook, and Siena’s Pendragon literary magazine. They study abroad, pursue internships at PR and marketing firms, newsrooms, and businesses, and our English Education majors fulfill their student teaching requirements at area schools. Each year, our best majors are inducted into Sigma Tau Delta, the English Honors Society. All our English graduates are versatile, well rounded, and well prepared for civic and intellectual life beyond Siena. Careers for English majors Our English majors often go on to careers in education or journalism, but many also pursue successful careers in business, law, medicine, public service, theater, and counseling. Some of our majors pursue graduate programs in English or writing. When you graduate with an English degree, you are prepared for any career that requires strong communication, effective collaboration, critical evaluation, and the ability to write clearly. Program Highlights: Small class sizes Student-centered approach Combines students’ desire for knowledge and self-understanding Discussion based courses Focus on the development of critical thinking skills Collaborative spirit Fosters connections to a broader, more diverse world Requirements for the Major (39 cr.) ENGL011 - Literary Perspectives 3 cr. OR ENGL090 - Honors-Great Books 3 cr. AND ENGL200 - Survey of English Literature I 3 cr. ENGL205 - Survey of English Lit II 3 cr. ENGL213 - Survey of American Literature 3 cr. English majors must also complete one course from each of the following area. Please note that although ENGL 240, 300, 205, 320, 325, 320 and 345 have two attributes, when these are taken they only count in one area. Period course in British or Irish Literature (LTIB) (3 cr.) choose from: ENGL240 - Shakespeare 3 cr. ENGL300 - Chaucer 3 cr. ENGL305 - Elizabethan Literature 3 cr. ENGL310 - English Renaissance Literature 3 cr. ENGL315 - Lit of the Enlightenment 3 cr. ENGL320 - Romantic Literature 3 cr. ENGL325 - Victorian Literature 3 cr. ENGL330 - Modern British Writers 3 cr. ENGL335 - Irish Literary Revival 3 cr. ENGL340 - Contemporary Irish Literature 3 cr. ENGL342 - Contemporary British Culture 3 cr. ENGL365 - Cold War Literature & Culture 3 cr. ENGL368 - Lit of the War in Vietnam 3 cr. ENGL370 - African American Literature 3 cr. ENGL372 - Native American Literature 3 cr. ENGL374 - Asian - American Literature 3 cr. ENGL376 - Latinola Literature 3 cr. ENGL378 - Contemporary American Lit 3 cr. British or American Literature prior to 1820 (LTBA) course (3 cr.) choose from: ENGL240 - Shakespeare 3 cr. ENGL300 - Chaucer 3 cr. ENGL305 - Elizabethan Literature 3 cr. ENGL310 - English Renaissance Literature 3 cr. ENGL315 - Lit of the Enlightenment 3 cr. ENGL320 - Romantic Literature 3 cr. ENGL345 - Early Amer Lit 1500 1820 3 cr. Special Topics (LTTP) course (3 cr.) choose from: ENGL210 - Women in Literature 3 cr. ENGL215 - Sexuality in Literature 3 cr. ENGL220 - Literature and the Environment 3 cr. ENGL222 - Reading Film 3 cr. ENGL225 - The Comic Spirit in Literature 3 cr. ENGL235 - Science Fiction 3 cr. ENGL236 - Adolescent Literature 3 cr. ENGL285 - Topics in English 3 cr. English Electives (15 cr.) Auxiliary courses (6 cr.) Two semesters in the same foreign language including American Sign Language (6 cr) Success Stats For the Class of 2013, 91% are employed or in graduate school One in three students study abroad 40% receive a master’s, doctorate or professional degree The freshman retention rate is 92% One in five students participate in an independent study or research project 58% participate in internships Skills Developed Critical thinking Written and oral communication Collaborative problem-solving Facility for addressing diverse, multicultural, and theoretically complex topics and concerns Capacity for dialogue, peer-to-peer, and small-group engagement Lifelong passion for reading and new learning Employers of our Graduates Albany Medical Center ESPN Federal Judiciary Fidelity Investments GE InStyle Magazine J. Crew New York City Department of Education Peace Corps Pearson Education PepsiCo The New York Post The Walt Disney Company Verizon Univision Internship Sites Cengage Learning College Fashionista Events With Style Her Campus New York State O Magazine Times Union Troy Business Improvement District Saratoga Living Magazine Siena Sports Communications SUNY Press WAMC WTEN YNN Albany Job Titles of Recent Graduates Editor Editorial Assistant English Teacher Legislative Assistant Manager of Creative Strategy Marketing Manager Media Relations Coordinator Online Media Planner Performance Manager Project Manager Public Information Specialist Public Relations Associate Technical Editor Television Anchor/Reporter Web Marketing and Social Media Strategist [-]

Political Science Major

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Loudonville

The political science program provides our students with a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the study of politics. Students actively participate in local, state and international communities. We foster informed and empowered citizens and prepare them for successful careers in today's diverse, connected and complex world. [+]

The political science program provides our students with a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of the study of politics. Students actively participate in local, state and international communities. We foster informed and empowered citizens and prepare them for successful careers in today's diverse, connected and complex world. As a political science major you’ll be trained to think critically about domestic and international political issues and gain a deep understanding of political institutions, processes, and value systems. You’ll also develop analytical and research skills critical to analyzing public opinion polls, statistics, laws, public policy, and the ways political issues affect national and international communities. Political Science at Siena Siena’s political science program will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of and appreciation for U.S. and world politics. Here, you’ll actively participate in local, state and international political arenas. You'll graduate as an informed and empowered citizen ready for a range of careers in this diverse, interconnected and complex world. Career options for political science majors As a political science major at Siena, you’ll graduate ready for graduate study or a career in government service, public policy, law, international affairs, education, journalism, or nonprofit and private-sector business. Our political science alumni attend graduate programs at Berkeley, the University of Michigan, the University of Texas, Rockefeller College, and Syracuse University, as well as law schools including William & Mary, Boston University, Boston College, American University, Fordham, and Albany Law. Program Highlights Commitment to shaping students as global citizens. Proximity to New York State’s Capital. Student clubs, including Model UN, Moot Court/Mock Trial and Political Science Society. Emphasis on development of diverse and cutting-edge research skills, including interviewing, focus groups, survey data and content analysis. Established Washington Semester Program with American University. Senior capstone, which allows students to engage in an independent research topic of their choice. Travel courses to Latin America, Nordic countries and more. Requirements for the Major (36 cr.) POSC100 - Contemporary U.S. Politics 3 cr. POSC130 - Political Theory 3 cr. POSC140 - Comparative Politics 3 cr. POSC150 - World Politics 3 cr. POSC178 - Political Research I 4 cr. POSC182 - Political Research II 4 cr. POSC495 - Capstone Prep Seminar 1 cr. POSC497 - Senior Capstone Thesis 3 cr. Political Science Electives (12 cr.) Success Stats 97% job or graduate school placement rate One in three pursue independent study or research 76% receive a master’s, doctorate or professional degree 66% participate in internships Skills Developed Independent research skills Leadership Critical thinking Confidence in writing and public speaking Ability to synthesize and/or distill large amounts of information Ability to make lucid, compelling and/or persuasive arguments Curiosity Adaptability Social responsibility Awareness of diversity and complexity Ability to work cross-culturally Career Preparation Students who major in political science have a foundation for future careers or graduate study in government service, public policy and administration, law, international affairs, teaching, journalism and nonprofit or private sector careers. Graduate and Professional Schools Attended by our Graduates University of California, Berkeley University of Michigan University of Texas, Austin School of International Training, University of Vermont Maxwell School of Public Affairs, Syracuse University College of William and Mary University of Virginia Boston University Boston College American University Fordham University Albany Law School Employers of our Graduates and Student Internship Sites Alliance for Quality Education American Medical Association Campaign for Terrance Modglin, Virginia House of Delegates Dow Chemical Company Edward Jones Foreign Policy Initiative Golub Corporation New York State Division of Criminal Justice New York State Governor’s Office New York State Senate’s Independent Democratic Conference New York State Senator David Carlucci New York State Senator Timothy Kennedy New York State Senator Kevin Parker New York State Unified Court System Pfizer St. Lawrence County District Attorney’s Office The White House U.S. Army U.S. Department of Homeland Security U.S. House of Representatives U.S. Representative Chris Gibson U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Job Titles of Recent Graduates Account Executive Associate Legal Advisor Attorney Communications Director Director of Government Affairs General Counsel Legislative Aide Legislative Policy Analyst Managing Director Manager of Media Services Marketing Counsel Paralegal Program Manager Public Relations Specialist Researcher Senior Consultant Senior Project Manager Senior Policy Analyst [-]

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