Hardin-Simmons University

Introduction

Founded in 1891 by a dedicated group of ministers, ranchers, and merchants, Hardin-Simmons University continues its commitment to developing the minds and nurturing the spiritual lives of its students. HSU, a private university located in Abilene, Texas, has been affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas since 1941. HSU provides an academically challenging undergraduate education based on a liberal arts foundation, and advances scholarly growth by offering specialized graduate and professional degree programs. Combining its commitment to academic excellence and a concern for the development of the total person with a distinctive Christian perspective, Hardin-Simmons serves students through quality educational programs designed to provide An Education Enlightened by Faith.

It is the mission of Hardin-Simmons University to be a community dedicated to providing excellence in education enlightened by Christian faith and values.

HSU Fast Facts

Mission

The mission of Hardin-Simmons University is to be a community dedicated to providing excellence in education enlightened by Christian faith and values.

Location

A large community with a small-town feel, Abilene is a leading educational, business, and medical hub in West Texas with a metropolitan population of approximately 120,000. There are numerous entertainment options available for college students, including a variety of restaurants, shops, and commercial businesses.

Campus

The main HSU campus sits on 96 beautifully landscaped acres, with the total property encompassing 220 acres. Comprised of 33 major buildings, including eight classroom buildings, six residence halls, and two apartment complexes, the HSU campus is a place where students feel at home.

History

HSU was established in 1891 as a private, coeducational, liberal arts university. Affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas and accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, students of all faiths, ethnicities, races, and walks of life are welcome.

The HSU Commitment

Your tuition rate will not be increased while you are enrolled full time as an undergraduate or graduate student during consecutive fall/spring semesters and are making continuous, satisfactory progress toward a degree. (Does not apply to enrollment in doctoral programs or courses in the Patty Hanks Shelton School of Nursing or Logsdon Seminary.)

Student Body Fall 2015

2,212 Total Student Population

  • 1,638 Undergraduate
  • 474 Graduate
  • 97 Master of Divinity
  • 33 Doctor of Ministry
  • 85 Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • 29 Doctor of Education in Leadership
  • 230 Other Graduate Studies

Endowment

In excess of $150 million.

Faculty

Our 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio ensures that each student at HSU receives individualized attention and allows students to develop meaningful relationships with professors. Ninety percent of our faculty hold the highest available degree in their fields.

Academic Divisions

  • College of Fine Arts
  • Cynthia Ann Parker College of Liberal Arts
  • Holland School of Sciences and Mathematics
  • Irvin School of Education
  • Kelley College of Business
  • Logsdon School of Theology
  • Patty Hanks Shelton School of Nursing

Degrees Offered

  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Bachelor of Behavioral Science
  • Bachelor of Business Administration
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts
  • Bachelor of Music
  • Bachelor of Science
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Arts
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship
  • Master of Divinity
  • Master of Education
  • Master of Music
  • Master of Science
  • Master of Science in Nursing
  • Doctor of Education in Leadership
  • Doctor of Ministry
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy

Distinctive Programs

  • Honors Program
  • International Studies
  • Leadership Studies
  • Ethics Minor

Accreditations & Memberships

  • Association Council for Business Schools and Programs
  • Association of Theological Schools
  • Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education
  • Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)
  • Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
  • Council of Social Work Education
  • National Association of Schools of Music
  • Texas Board of Nursing
  • Texas Education Agency
  • Council of Independent Colleges
  • International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities
  • The Center for Student Opportunity: Promoting a College-Bound Culture
  • The Council for Christian Colleges & Universities
  • University and College Accountability Network

Financial Aid

In 2012-13, $47 million was awarded in federal, state, and institutional programs, including scholarships, loans, grants, and work-study. Ninety-four percent of the HSU students received financial aid.

Library

The HSU libraries have 443,979 listed items in the online catalog. The Abilene Library Consortium currently makes available 2,105,926 items.

Technology

Wireless technology is accessible to 95% of the main campus with 235 computers available for student use in 14 labs and three communal areas.

Campus Life

More than 50 student clubs and organizations exist on campus, including: service, religious, honor, academic discipline, civic, and political organizations. Many HSU students participate in local fraternities and sororities, which are campus-based social or service clubs.

Athletics

HSU is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division III, and American Southwest Conference. HSU offers 18 varsity sports, including teams in basketball, golf, tennis, cross country, track, and soccer for men and women, as well as programs in football and baseball for men and volleyball and softball for women.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

View Bachelor »

Programs

This school also offers:

Bachelor

Bachelor in Athletic Training

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

HSU Athletic Training is dedicated to the development of future athletic training professionals through our athletic training degree program. [+]

HSU Athletic Training is dedicated to the development of future athletic training professionals through our athletic training degree program. We strongly believe that our warm and inviting campus with its dedicated professionals provide students with unique and rewarding opportunities to grow personally and professionally as athletic trainers through an “education enlightened by faith.” We encourage you to explore the many opportunities that HSU Athletic Training can offer. ATs are healthcare professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. ATs can be found anywhere there are active people. Athletic training is practiced by athletic trainers, health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and intervention of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations, and disabilities. (www.nata.org) Athletic Training Education Mission Statement The Hardin-Simmons University Athletic Training Program (AT) provides the opportunity for professional preparation and growth of athletic training students and staff members, through a combination of formal and informal education along with structured practical experiences in a Christian environment. Both the classroom and various clinical settings provide a superb environment for athletic training students to obtain the resources and experiences necessary to meet their individual needs to become credentialed athletic trainers, by keeping literature, equipment and techniques current with technological and scientific trends in the athletic training community. Objectively, the AT aims to build a positive reputation among athletic training students, student-athletes, parents, administrators, physicians, community and region by maintaining a professional and ethical environment, to ensure the athletic training student is prepared to become a successful athletic training professional upon graduation. This preparation must include not only knowledge and skills, but values, ethics, and effective critical- thinking and decision-making skills. The dedicated faculty of the HSU AT strive to be leaders in all domains of athletic training. These goals and philosophy will be the foundation on which the entire program is supported. The athletic training faculty will project an image of a skilled, hard-working, integrity-driven and compassionate professional while using ethics, professionalism and good judgment, centering on the well-being of the athletic training student to guide our attitudes and actions. To ensure excellence in athletic training education, frequent evaluations will be conducted, geared to developing strengths and leadership qualities, as well as improving individual weaknesses, in all students and AT faculty members. These evaluations, as well as credentialing examination results and first-year graduate and employer surveys, will directly enhance the AT. This commitment to the constant evaluation of program strengths and weaknesses will allow necessary improvements to be made to strengthen the AT. Program Goals and Objectives To provide students desiring to attend a small, Christian university with an opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in athletic training which will prepare them to provide the broadest range of athletic training services, including injury prevention, recognition, evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation, through both classroom and clinical experiences. To provide athletic training students with the knowledge, skills, values and abilities to successfully complete all requirements for state licensure and BOC certification. To effectively prepare students to enter the athletic training profession in their chosen setting, so they may enhance the provision of health care through prevention, diagnosis and intervention with emergency, acute and chronic medical conditions. To promote athletic training as an allied health profession, and to positively impact public perception of athletic training and its role in the global health care community. Accreditation The first certified/licensed athletic trainer came to Hardin-Simmons in 1982 and the athletic training tradition at HSU was born. From 1986-1999, Hardin-Simmons had a strong internship- based athletic training program. In 1999, HSU began offering a major leading to a Bachelor of Behavior Science (BBS) degree in Athletic Training. The AT program was initially accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in 2005. The AT program underwent reaccreditation during the 2009-2010 academic year and is currently accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) through 2019-2020. Athletic training students who successfully complete the AT degree are eligible for the Texas State Athletic Training Licensure exam offered by the Texas Department of State Health Services/Advisory Board of Athletic Trainers and the Board of Certification, Inc. (BOC) exam. Successful completion of these credentialing examinations will provide the athletic training graduate with Texas licensure and national certification as an athletic trainer. Admissions Incoming students must meet the AT admissions criteria below. Students who transfer to HSU will also have to meet these requirements to gain acceptance into the program. The Director of Athletic Training Education will review the transfer student's transcript to determine if transferring courses and credits meet AT degree requirements. Please refer to the complete AT Transfer Policy here. Full AT Admissions Criteria are: Completion of at least 12 semester hours Prerequisite course: ATTR 1310 – Introduction to Athletic Training (Grade of B or higher) Recommended but not required course: BIOL 2410 – Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology Overall GPA of at least 2.5 in all other coursework Proof of current first aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer certificates (can be earned in ATTR 1310) Student selection criteria will also be based upon the following: Accurate completion of AT admissions application Completion of the AT Admissions Questionnaire Letter of recommendation from former supervising athletic trainers/coaches/allied health/medical professionals (use form provided). Signed AT technical standards document (located here). Performance evaluations provided by professional supervisors during scheduled observation experiences. This will include work ethic, punctuality, adherence to policy(dress code, confidentiality, etc.), professionalism, etc. Personal interview with AT program faculty, preceptors and/or current AT students All applications become the property of HSU and are maintained in the student’s AT application file. The application materials are reviewed by the program director to assure minimum acceptance requirements are met, and provided to other AT faculty. The students’ interests and future goals are considered, as well as strengths and weaknesses considered relevant to the students’ educational process and possible future athletic training career. After reviewing the application materials, the student’s application score is calculated utilizing the Applicant Evaluation Worksheet and the AT director makes a determination of the student’s acceptability into the program. If a student meets the criteria and demonstrates characteristics indicative of success in the athletic training profession, he or she is accepted. If there are more qualified candidates than there are positions in the program, the candidates are rank ordered according to academic records and personal qualifications using the application score sheet. If a student shows promise of success in the field, but has an area of concern or has not completely met a criterion, the student may be admitted provisionally. The student must repair the deficiency within a mutually agreed upon period of time (usually one semester). To maintain good standing in the AT, students must maintain minimum GPA and other requirements listed below: 2.5 minimum overall GPA 3.0 minimum GPA in ATTR courses Satisfactory progression on clinical skills, professionalism and annual practical evaluations (see appropriate Field Experience course syllabus) NATA membership (part of FSSC Professional Development Requirement) Graduation requirements include all of the above, plus: Professional presentation given during senior year (credit given in ATTR 4121) Application submitted for BOC exam (credit given in ATTR 4121) Athletic training students admitted to the program begin taking advanced course work in athletic training and are enrolled each semester in clinical/field experiences with clinical instructors in NCAA- sponsored sports at HSU, as well as clinical/field experiences at Abilene Sports Medicine & Orthopedics Texas Midwest Surgery Center, Texas Sport & Spine D1 Elite Physical Therapy Chad Ezzell, MD (primary care/sports medicine) office Abilene-Cooper High School. [-]

Bachelor in Biology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

We are dedicated to high quality teaching and research about the science of life, from molecules to ecosystems. Our primary job is to prepare students for careers in health science, teaching, research, and graduate study in biology and environmental science. Please consider a quality education in a caring environment at Hardin-Simmons University. [+]

We are dedicated to high quality teaching and research about the science of life, from molecules to ecosystems. Our primary job is to prepare students for careers in health science, teaching, research, and graduate study in biology and environmental science. Please consider a quality education in a caring environment at Hardin-Simmons University. Courses 1301 Modern Concepts in Biology (3-3-0) This course presents the application of the scientific method in the biological sciences at the introductory level. Designed for non-majors, the emphasis of this course will be in the area of expertise of the professor. Fall, Spring 1401 Life Science (4-3-2) [#] A study of the fundamental concepts of biology with special application to man. This is a one-semester course designed to serve as an option to satisfy the core requirement in natural science. Credit is not given for both BIOL 1401 and SCIE 2410. Fall, Spring 1320 General Zoology (3-3-0) [#] An introduction to the study of invertebrates and vertebrates, emphasizing morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology of individuals and populations. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1120 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. This course is designed for students majoring or minoring in biology. (Not intended for core requirement for non-science majors and minors.) Fall, Sprin 1120 General Zoology Laboratory (1-0-3) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to the study of invertebrates and vertebrates emphasizing morphology, physiology, behavior and ecology of individuals and populations. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1320 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. (Not intended for core requirement for non-science majors and minors.) Fall, Spring 1321 Plant Biology (3-3-0) [#] An introduction to the study of plants with major emphasis on plant anatomy, physiology, life histories, and ecology. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1121 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. This course is designed for students majoring or minoring in biology. (Not intended for core requirement for non-science majors/minors.) Fall, Spring 1121 Plant Biology Laboratory (1-0-2) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to the study of plants emphasizing plant anatomy, physiology, life histories, and ecology. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 1321 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. (Not intended for core requirement for non-science majors and minors.) Fall, Spring 2099 (1-4 hrs. credit) Special Topics Special course designed to serve the general interest of students. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Will not count toward a major or minor in biology. 2101 Introduction to Physical Therapy (1-3-0) Introductory study of professions and professional education for students interested in any of the health sciences with emphasis on physical therapy; includes an overview of the duties, responsibilities and education of physical therapists. A major focus of the course will be presentations by physical therapists and visits to health care facilities. Fall 2402 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4-3-2) [#] Structure and function of the human body. Systems covered include muscular, skeletal and nervous. This first course will introduce materials in histology, cytology, and body chemistry. Fall, Summer 2403 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4-3-2) [#] Structure and function of the human body. Systems covered include circulatory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine. Spring, Summer 2405 Public Health Microbiology (4-3-3) Fundamental principles and procedures of bacteriology are emphasized in regard to disease-producing organisms. Organism characteristics, culture, and control are also included. May not be counted toward a major or minor in biology. Will not satisfy science core requirements. Spring, Summer 2410 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology (4-3-2) Survey of the structure and function of the human body. All major body systems are covered. Laboratory emphasis will be placed on skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. (This course will not satisfy the degree requirements for Nursing and Exercise Science majors or Biology as a teaching field) (May be used to satisfy the four-hour core requirement of a science course with lab for non-Science majors). Fall, Spring 2420 Introduction to Cell Biology (4-3-2) Study of structure and function of cells and cell components. Included are biochemical and biophysical aspects of cell architecture, cell cycle, energy transductions, nucleic acid and protein syntheses, membrane structure and function, and cell cycle regulation. This course is required before students can take BIOL 3411.Prerequisites: BIOL 1320 and 1120 or BIOL 1321 and 1121, or approval of instructor. Fall, Spring 3099 (1-4 hours credit) Special Problems Field or laboratory studies of biological material. Emphasis is to be placed in the area of research of the professor teaching the course. Prerequisite: One to three years of biology (depending on level for which credit is given) or permission of the Department Head. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Fall, Spring, Summer 3103 Forensic Science Lab (1-0-2) Laboratory application of techniques used in crime scene investigation and scientific analysis of evidence. The use of microscopes, basic chemical analysis of solutions, some field work, and group projects are required. Videos, demonstrations, and field trips will augment the experience. This lab is designed to parallel the information presented in BIOL 3303. Concurrent enrollment or previous completion of BIOL 3303 required. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Corequisite: enrollment in BIOL 3303. Spring, Summer. 3302 Drugs and Society (3-3-0) A survey of the history of drug development and use in the United States and other countries. The major classes of drugs and their effects on the body, the laws regulating drug development and use, and the sociological and psychological theories on drug use are the core of the class. Comparative cultural views of drug use and a brief history of drug legislation around the world will be included. Both licit and illicit drugs will be studied. This course will not count for science credit for science majors/minors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Fall, even years. 3303 Topics in Forensic Science (3-3-0) A course designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of forensic science including: the role of the forensic scientist, crime scene investigation, analysis of evidence, the forensic laboratory, and careers in various areas of the forensic sciences. Actual case studies, many of which are documented on videos, will enhance the application of information presented in each major area. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Spring, Summer. 3307 Nutrition (3-3-0) A study of the biochemical role of the various food substances essential to good nutrition. Practical experience will be provided in planning diets for persons of different ages and different needs. Prerequisite: 8 hrs of BIOL or consent of instructor. Fall 3312 Statistical Methods (3-3-0) (See MATH 3312 for course description.) Spring, Summer 3313 Kinesiology (3-3-0) (See FSSC 3313 for course description.) Prerequisite: 4 hours of human anatomy. Fall, Spring 3335 Computers in Science (3-3-0) (CSCI 3335) A lecture and project-based course designed to introduce numerical methods, parametric statistics, data analysis, various scientific statistics software, and techniques used to portray data in the sciences will be explored in this course. Various public domain databases, and uses of this data, will be explored. Current topics will include biometry, bioinformatics, and Geographic Information Science (GIS). This course fulfills the university technology competency. Prerequisite: two semesters of science and two semesters of mathematics are required or consent of instructor. Fall 3410 General Ecology (4-3-3) A course studying the interactions of organisms with each other and with their environments. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology. Fall, Spring, Summer 3411 Genetics (4-3-3) Focus on the fundamental principles of genetics including Mendelian inheritance, expression and interaction of genes, linkage, biochemical nature of genetic material and mutation. Prerequisite: BIOL1320, 1120, 1321, 1121, 2420. Spring, Fall 3416 Advanced Vertebrate Biology (4-3-3) A survey of the phylogeny, life history, evolution and behavior of vertebrates. Field and laboratory investigations of vertebrate ecology, natural history, and phylogeny will be undertaken. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology. Fall 3417 General Physiology (4-3-2) Functions of living systems with both theoretical and laboratory investigations. Major emphasis is placed on mammals. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology and CHEM 1410 and 1411. Spring 3418 Advanced Human Anatomy (4-3-2) An in-depth study of structures of the human body incorporating both gross and microscopic coverage of major body systems. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology. Fall 3420 General Microbiology (4-3-3) The biology of microorganisms with an emphasis on bacterial morphology, physiology, and genetics. Topics in applied microbiology, immunology, and virology are introduced. Prerequisite: Eight hours of biology and eight hours of chemistry or consent of instructor. Fall 3421 Advanced Botany (4-3-3) An examination of trends in the morphology, physiology, and life history of plants with emphasis on higher plants. Topics covered include plant anatomy; plant reproduction; plant growth and development; and plant identification. Prerequisites: BIOL 1320 and 1120, 1321 and 1121. Spring (even years) 3424 Cell Biology (4-3-3) An in depth study of eukaryotic cell structure and function at the molecular level. Emphasis will be placed on cellular and molecular mechanisms of development. Prerequisite: BIOL 2420. Spring (even years) 4099 (1-4 hours credit) Special Topics Special topics in biology that meet a special student need. The course may be repeated as different subject matter is taught. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biology and permission of department. Fall, Spring, Summer 4104 Seminar in Biology (1-1-0) Papers and discussion on subjects of biological interest. Prerequisite: 2 years of biology and permission of department. Fall, Spring 4223 Microscopic Anatomy (2-1-1) A general comparative study of human cells, tissues, and organ systems. Principles of cytology, histology and embryology are included. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology. 4302 Immunology (3-3-0) A study of the vertebrate immune system, its chemistry, histology and genetics. Also covered is disease prevention and cause, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Prerequisite: BIOL 1320, 1120, 1321, 1121 and 2420, or consent of instructor. Spring. (Odd years.) 4330 Molecular Biology (3-3-0) An in-depth analysis of the structure, organization, and replication of DNA, and the components that control gene expression through transcription and translation. An emphasis on the theory of current techniques will also be included. Prerequisite: BIOL 3411 or CHEM 4311 or consent of instructor. 4411 Natural History of the Southwest (4-3-3) Travel course designed to provide active learning about the flora, fauna, and habitat associations in the southwestern United States. Emphasis will be placed on the natural history, adaptation and ecology of organisms in these biomes. Prerequisite: 8 hours of biology and consent of instructor. May term 4422 Advanced Environmental Biology (4-2-4) Quantitative and qualitative concepts of plant and animal community structure, interrelationships, and development. Emphasis to be placed in the area of research of the professor teaching the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 3410. Spring (odd years) [-]

Bachelor in Business

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

If you want to contribute meaningfully to the fulfillment of your organization’s purpose, you will need skills, and perhaps highly specialized skills. At Hardin-Simmons’ Kelley College of Business, you will have the opportunity to develop many of them. Some skills will be highly specific, like the ability to read financial statements. Others will be general, but even more important:The ability to read and be aware of subtle distinctions. The ability to write. The ability to manipulate numbers and information. [+]

Most people spend 30 to 50 years of their lives working in some type of organization – a church, a charity, a professional partnership, a corporation, or something else.You will probably do the same. All organizations exist to transform ideas into goods or services.They exist because the process of transformation is complex, and no one person can do it alone. Managers need to work with accountants. Marketing specialists need to work with managers of information systems. Lawyers need to work with everyone. If you want to contribute meaningfully to the fulfillment of your organization’s purpose, you will need skills, and perhaps highly specialized skills. At Hardin-Simmons’ Kelley College of Business, you will have the opportunity to develop many of them. Some skills will be highly specific, like the ability to read financial statements. Others will be general, but even more important: The ability to read and be aware of subtle distinctions. The ability to write. The ability to manipulate numbers and information. Business majors at HSU experience a rigorous academic program designed to prepare them for life in the business world. The Educational Testing Service regularly places our graduates in the top quintile of all business-school graduates nationwide. We thank you for your interest in Hardin-Simmons University’s Kelley College of Business, and we look forward to seeing you here. Sincerely, Michael L. Monhollon - Dean, Kelley College of Business Internship Program During a business student's experience at any university, the majority of learning and exposure to new concepts occurs in a traditional classroom setting. This is an important part of any student's education; it provides them a wealth of information that will enable them to perform deftly when they begin their post-graduation career. There, of course, is the rub - which is the task of parlaying their classroom experience into their first job. The Hardin-Simmons University Kelley College of Business Internship Program permits students to begin working in a business setting while still enrolled in the university. The benefit of such an experience is that students can begin to apply the knowledge they learn in the classroom before graduation. Not only does this experience allow students to gain upper division elective hours, but it also gives them an opportunity to determine what route they plan to follow in business upon graduation. Eligibility for the internship program: students must be enrolled in the Kelley College of Business students must have completed four semesters or at least 60 semester hours of credit toward a business degree students must carry a minimum 2.5 grade point average and meet any other requirements set by individual employers students must be recommended by their advisors for internship credit. Course credit: Students may petition the Kelley College of Business to earn three semester hours of college credit by meeting the following criteria: 1. maintain a journal relative to the job The journal that you keep while taking part in your internship should contain documentation of all tasks performed during the internship, specific experiences pertaining to your major and career field, and observations regarding information and practices that relate to what you have learned in the classroom. This journal will be included with your report as an appendix. 2. submit a typed report summarizing the internship The report is that heart of the internship. An internship bridges the worldplace with the classroom. The report is where you will demonstrate that you are able to link the job and classroom together. In the report, you are to identify how the internship experience relates to what he/she has learned in the classroom. It is important that the student talk about specific information learned in courses that was useful or used during the internship. The report should also include current events in the student's field that they came across and also skills attained on the job. This report should also describe the courses at HSU that were most helpful to you in your internship. 3. prepare and give an oral presentation to the Kelley College of Business faculty The presentation is esentially a summarized, oral form of your report and journal. The student may use visuals such as powerpoint, white board, or an overhead projector in order to facilitate his/her presentation to the faculty. Presentations are typically 20 minutes long (which should include about 5 minutes for questions). 4. receive a satisfactory job evaluation from the employer. This can take the form of a recommendation letter or the completion of a written evaluation of your work by the employer upon request of the student. Course credit counts as an advanced business elective. Pass/fail grades are given for internship credit. The student's faculty advisor must approve the internship. The internship experience requires at least 100 hours of work related to the student's academic field. Student Organizations The Kelley College of Business at Hardin-Simmons University is home to several student organizations. All are vibrant, dynamic organizations existing to develop leadership and business skills and life-long friendships among members. Delta Mu Delta is an International Honor Society in Business. With a total membership that has now surpassed 150,000 undergraduates, graduates, and doctorate students, Delta Mu Delta has a two-fold mission—to promote higher scholarship in education for business and to recognize and reward business students who have distinguished themselves scholastically. The Iota Eta Chapter of Delta Mu Delta at Hardin-Simmons University was chartered in 1999. Invitation to membership is extended to those business students in the top 20 percent of their college class (with a minimum 3.25 gpa). Initiation is conducted in the fall semester each year. More information can be found at the Society’s web site: http://www.deltamudelta.org The KGB Technically called Kappa Gamma Beta, but the common shorthand sounds a bit more intimidating. Hardin-Simmons University has a number of social clubs, this one for business students. Work with other students to develop service opportunities, network, and just have fun. In addition to enjoying volleyball nights and fielding a Relay-for-Life team, the KGB has accompanied professors to the metroplex to visit The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Ranger Stadium, The Bureau of Engraving, Anchor Fabricators, a precision metal fabricator and government contractor, Weaver, a regional accounting firm with offices across Texas, and the VP of Marketing for the Belo Corporation, a Fortune 500 company. [-]

Bachelor in Chemistry & Physics

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

The department offers the student the opportunity of gaining a broad-based foundation in the respective chemistry disciplines. The department provides training in the application of chemical and physical principles to other fields and introduces the liberal arts student to a basic understanding of chemistry and physics. This course of study is designed to prepare the student for teaching, industrial work, and graduate education. [+]

The department offers the student the opportunity of gaining a broad-based foundation in the respective chemistry disciplines. The department provides training in the application of chemical and physical principles to other fields and introduces the liberal arts student to a basic understanding of chemistry and physics. This course of study is designed to prepare the student for teaching, industrial work, and graduate education. Courses CHEMISTRY (CHEM) 1101 Essentials of Chemistry I Lab (1-0-3) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to inorganic chemistry emphasizing chemical reactions, solution chemistry, gas laws and acid base chemistry. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of CHEM 1301 is required. 1102 Essentials of Chemistry II Lab (1-0-3) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to the principals of organic and biochemistry. Topics covered will include an introduction to organic chemistry, biologically important molecules and metabolism. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of CHEM 1302 is required. 1110 General Chemistry I Lab (1-0-3) [#] Laboratory course for studying the principles of chemistry: atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, reactions in solution, gas laws and thermochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1310 or concurrent enrollment. 1111 General Chemistry II Lab (1-0-3) [#] Laboratory course for studying of the properties of liquids, solids and solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311 or concurrent enrollment. 1301 Essentials of Chemistry I (3-3-0) [#] An introduction to the principles of inorganic chemistry. Number handling, solution chemistry, gas laws and acid/base chemistry will be among the topics covered. This course may not be used to satisfy the degree requirements of science majors or minors. 1302 Essentials of Chemistry II (3-3-0) [#] An introduction to the principals of organic and biochemistry. Topics covered will include an introduction to organic chemistry, biologically important molecules and metabolism. The course may not be used to satisfy the degree requirements of science majors or minors. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301. 1310 General Chemistry I (3-3-0) [#] This course covers the foundational concepts of general chemistry: atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, reactions in solution, gas laws and thermochemistry. Prerequisite: MATH 1310 or 1320 or concurrent enrollment. 1311 General Chemistry II (3-3-0) [#] This course covers the more advanced concepts of general chemistry: properties of liquids, solids and solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1310. 2099 (1-4 hours credit) Special Topics Topics will be chosen to meet special student needs. Topics that may be covered are one semester organic chemistry, history of chemistry, etc. One, two or three hours of lecture each week. Laboratory may be included for some topics. May be repeated for credit when different subject matter is taught. 3401, 3402 Organic Chemistry I, II (4-3-3) A study of principles of organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1311, 1111, 3401 (for 3402). Fall, Spring 3410 Quantitative Analysis and Electrochemistry (4-3-3) The theory and application of quantitative analysis techniques and electrochemistry to the chemistry of both inorganic and organic systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 3402 or consent of instructor. Fall 3411 Spectroscopy and Chromatography (4-3-3) Theory and application of the principles of chromatography to analytical chemistry in both inorganic and organic systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 3402 and 3410 or consent of instructor. Spring 4099 (1-4 hours credit) Selected Topics Special topics chosen to meet a special student need or to take advantage of the specialties of the faculty. Topics may be general such as advanced physical chemistry, etc., or more specific such as quantum mechanics. One, two, or three hours lecture each week. May be repeated when different subject matter is taught. 4105 Chemistry Seminar (1-1-0) A student seminar course that explores topics of current importance in chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisites: 24 hours of chemistry coursework and permission of the department head. 4120 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (1-0-3) Laboratory course for CHEM 4320. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4320 or consent of instructor. As needed. 4121 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1-0-3) Laboratory course for CHEM 4321. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4321 or consent of instructor. As needed. 4140, 4240, 4340 Individual Research Qualified students may elect individual work in a specialized field under supervision of faculty members. May be repeated for credit when nature of a problem requires or when a new problem is started. 4301 Biophysical Chemistry (3-3-0) A study of the principles of physical chemistry and their application to biophysical systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 4311 and MATH 1320. As needed. 4304 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3-0) A study of the structure and reactions in inorganic chemistry with emphasis on the area of transition metals. Prerequisite: CHEM 3401 and 4401. Spring (odd years) 4310 Biochemistry I (3-3-0) Study of the structure properties and function of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and biological membranes. Prerequisite: CHEM 3402 and BIOL 2420. Fall 4311 Biochemistry II (3-3-0) Study of bioenergetics, biosignalling and the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids.. Prerequisite: CHEM 4310. Spring 4312 Biochemical Techniques (3-1-6) A laboratory course that presents methodology and instrumentation used to study biomolecules. Techniques for the purification and analysis of proteins as well as basic molecular biology protocols will be presented. Prerequisite: CHEM 4311 or concurrent enrollment. Spring. 4320 Physical Chemistry I (3-3-0) Thermodynamics and its application to systems in equilibrium. Topics include equations of state, equilibrium thermodynamics, ideal and nonideal solutions, phase equilibrium and thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Prerequisite: MATH 1321 and PHYS 2402. Fall (odd years). 4321 Physical Chemistry II (3-3-0) Study of the macroscopic properties of chemical systems from a microscopic analysis. Topics include kinetic- molecular theory, molecular energy levels, fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 4320. Spring (even years). 4405 Environmental Chemistry (4-3-3) A study of the earth’s natural processes as they occur in air, water, and soil. This course will focus on both naturally operating and altered environmental systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 3410. Spring. PHYSICS (PHYS) 1099, 2099, 3099, 4099 Selected Topics (1-4 hours credit) Topics will be chosen to meet student needs. One, two or three lecture hours each week. May be repeated when different subject material is taught. 1105 Applied Physics of Sports Lab (1-0-2) Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1305 that investigates the physics involved in sports, exercise, and the human body. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1305 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. Spring (even years). 1110 General Physics I Lab (1-0-2) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat, and sound. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1310 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. 1111 General Physics II Lab (1-0-2) [#] Laboratory course providing an introduction to fundamental concepts of magnetism, electricity, light and atomic physics. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1311 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. 1120 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab (1-0-2) A calculus-level laboratory course providing an introduction to mechanics and heat. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1320 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. Fall (odd years). 1121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Lab (1-0-2) A calculus-level laboratory course providing an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1321 is required unless waived by the student’s advisor. Spring (even years.) 1305 Applied Physics of Sports (3-3-0) An abridged physics course covering the applications of mechanics, fluids, heat and electromagnetism to sports and exercise as well as the human athlete. This course may not be used to satisfy the degree requirement for majors or minors. Prerequisite: MATH 1311. Spring (even years). 1310 General Physics I (3-3-0) [#] A general course in physics: mechanics, heat, and sound. Prerequisite: MATH 1311. 1311 General Physics II (3-3-0) [#] A general course in physics: fundamental concepts of magnetism, electricity, light and atomic physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1310. 1320 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (3-3-0) A calculus-level introduction of the principles of mechanics and heat. Prerequisite: MATH 1320 or permission of the instructor. Fall (odd years). 1321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (3-3-0) A calculus-level introduction of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1320 and MATH 1321 or permission of the instructor. Spring even years. 2405 Introduction to Speech Acoustics (4-3-2) A laboratory course that introduces the nature of sound produced by the spoken human voice and the aural perceptions of sound and speech. This course covers vibrations, wave phenomena, sound generation and propagation, the nature of hearing, room acoustics, and the analysis of sound. The analysis and sound production of the spoken voice will be of particular emphasis. This course may not be used to satisfy the degree requirement for science majors or minors. Prerequisite: MATH 1301 or 1310. Spring (odd years). 2406 Introduction to Musical Acoustics (4-3-2) A laboratory course that introduces the nature of sound produced by the human voice and musical instruments. The course will cover vibrations, wave phenomena, sound generation and propagation, the nature of hearing, room acoustics and the analysis of sound. The analysis of the sound production of musical instruments will be of particular emphasis. This course may not be used to satisfy the degree requirement for science majors or minors. Prerequisite: MATH 1301 or 1310. Fall (even years). 2410 Modern Physics (4-3-3) Introduction to aspects of modern physics; relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, nuclear physics and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1321, 1121 and MATH 1321. Fall (even years). 3320 Classical Dynamics (3-3-0) Introduction to advanced classical dynamics: particle motion in one and three dimensions including oscillatory motion and motion under a central force, dynamics of many particle systems, and Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations. Prerequisite: PHYS 2410 and MATH 2321 or concurrent enrollment. Spring (odd years). 3340 Statistical Physics and Thermodynamics (3-3-0) Introduction to thermodynamics and the statistical description of thermal processes. Prerequisite: PHYS 2410 and MATH 1321. Fall (odd years). 4090 Special Problems (1-4 hours credit) Advanced work in physics, the nature of which is determined by the previous preparation and interest of the student. Credit hours will depend on the nature of the problem and the amount of completed coursework. May be repeated when different subject material is taught. Prerequisite: PHYS 2410 or consent of the instructor. 4310 Quantum Mechanics (3-3-0) This course offers an introduction to quantum mechanics, including such topics as wave mechanics, Schrödinger’s equation and its applications, barrier problems, harmonic oscillators, angular momentum, and applications to atomic and molecular processes. Prerequisite: PHYS 3320 and MATH 2321 and 3305. Spring (odd years) [-]

Bachelor in Criminal Justice

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

The field of criminal justice is dynamic and our local, state, and federal agencies are recruiting men and women of integrity, dedication, and a strong desire to serve their communities. HSU is committed to providing an education that will enhance personal and professional goals for each student. The Criminal Justice Department is invested in the education and development of individuals toward achieving their goals and in preparing them to demonstrate those qualities sought by agencies at all levels of this vital system. [+]

The field of criminal justice is dynamic and our local, state, and federal agencies are recruiting men and women of integrity, dedication, and a strong desire to serve their communities. HSU is committed to providing an education that will enhance personal and professional goals for each student. The Criminal Justice Department is invested in the education and development of individuals toward achieving their goals and in preparing them to demonstrate those qualities sought by agencies at all levels of this vital system. At HSU, we recognize that men and women with the strength of purpose to serve in the field of criminal justice are among the most valuable members of our society. Therefore, we have taken steps to establish a criminal justice program which inspires as well as educates. In addition, the Christian values associated with HSU’s hundred years of academic excellence make lifetime impressions on those who choose a career in the criminal justice profession. HSU Criminal Justice Association The HSU Criminal Justice Association is an organization that allows students to become actively involved with the many aspects of the law enforcement and corrections systems. Guest speakers, demonstrations, field trips, and participation in various service and application driven activities provide students with a greater understanding of the many facets of the criminal justice system while promoting opportunities for professional networking within the community. Employment Opportunities A career in criminal justice affords men and women many and varied employment opportunities at the local, state, and federal level. The Criminal Justice program at HSU will prepare students for careers in the criminal justice system. Careers in the field of criminal justice include: Law Enforcement Officer District Parole Officer Community Supervision Officer Forensics Technician Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agent Juvenile Probation Officer Juvenile Program Case Manager Prison Warden Correctional Officer Drug Enforcement Agent Victims Assistance Coordinator Border Patrol Agent Secret Service Agent Residential Program Professional Private Security Investigations Case Management for Specialized Caseloads Forensics Studies Minor This course of study provides students with the skills requisite to the investigation of criminal offenses and the identification, apprehension, and prosecution of criminal offenders. This curriculum integrates different disciplines pertaining to deviant and criminal behavior with the practice of identification, procurement, and presentation of evidence resulting from criminal activity. The curriculum blends crime scene analysis, laboratory analysis, behavioral analysis, and criminal law. The program’s objective is to develop a sound educational foundation for graduate work or professional practice at the bachelor’s level. Requirements: The minor requires 19 hours. Required Courses: 10 hours BIOL 3303 and 3103 Topics in Forensic Science and the Forensic Science Laboratory POLS/CRIJ 4313 Forensic Evidence and Expert Witness Testimony CSCI 3332 Introduction to Computer Forensics Elective Courses:Students may choose any three [3] of the following courses CRIJ 2301 Criminal Investigation POLS/CRIJ 2306 Evidence and Procedure POLS/CRIJ 3307 Criminal Law PSYC 3335 Psychology of Crime CRIJ 3311 Crime Scene Investigation CRIJ 4309 Terrorism and Homeland Security CRIJ 4355 Search and Seizure CRIJ 4309 Criminal Profiling What is Forensics? The term forensic investigation refers to the use of science and/or technology in the investigation and establishment of facts or evidence to be used in criminal justice and other legal proceedings. Forensic investigation is a rather broad field with many different subdivisions. The American Academy of Forensic Scienceand the International Association for Identificationare major professional organizations that advance the application of scientific methods and their relevance in the legal system. Forensic investigation is increasingly playing an important role in the pursuit of justice. However, the reality of forensic investigation is not the clear-cut endeavor that is portrayed in many television programs and other mass media sources. Forensic investigation is very complex. Forensic investigation techniques, when used appropriately, can be an incredible tool for practitioners and society. Used inappropriately, forensic investigation techniques can generate error and injustice in the system. Internship Requirement Each student is required to complete a 100-hour internship with a criminal justice agency during their senior year. This internship enables the student to obtain supervised field training, practical experience, and to integrate knowledge gained in the classroom. There are multiple internship sites from which to choose and students may obtain experience from more than one internship agency. [-]

Bachelor in Education

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

The goals for the Department of Educational Studies includes providing quality, value-centered pre-professional and professional education in a Christian environment, and encouraging students to lead lives of service to the community, the profession, and to our world. [+]

The goals for the Department of Educational Studies includes providing quality, value-centered pre-professional and professional education in a Christian environment, and encouraging students to lead lives of service to the community, the profession, and to our world. The Department of Educational Studies offers the following undergraduate certification programs: EC-6 (grades Early Childhood-6th Grade) 4-8 (specialized content areas: English/Language Arts/Reading, English/Language Arts/Reading/Social Studies, Math, and Science) 7-12 (specialized content areas) EC-12 (Art, Music, Theater, Physical Education, Spanish) The HSU faculty members embed opportunities through field experiences and summer camps within teacher preparation courses for education majors to collaborate and partner with public school administrators and faculty members in local, regional. Students develop confidence in preparing relevant and meaningful instruction for diverse learners, a professional attitude while teaching in various settings, and a balanced view of best teaching practices. We also offer certification at the graduate level for Master Reading Teacher, Reading Specialist, and Gifted and Talented Supplemental Certification, as well as graduate degrees in Reading Specialist Education and Gifted Education. The Department of Educational Studies also provides a post baccalaureate certification program, Express Teacher Certification (ETC) for those graduates seeking teacher certification. Admission Admission to the teacher education program of the University is by application to the Dean of the Irvin School of Education preferably upon completion of 36 semester hours. A candidate for admission must complete the Application for Admission to Teacher Education. He/she must met all University approved standards to be admitted including, but not limited to minimum achieved 2.8 gpa, have a degree plan on file, demonstrated proficiency in reading, oral and written communication, and mathematics. Admission policy and standards for admission are available upon request in the dean's office, Irvin School of Education. All standards must be met prior to making application to the teacher preparation program and to enrolling in any professional development course. Students who plan to make application to the teacher preparation program are encouraged to obtain the admission policy and standards for admission as early as possible to avoid delays in the admission process. All students interested in the teacher preparation program at HSU should meet with the HSU Certification Officer in Abilene Hall to discuss the teacher preparation program and admission requirements. The HSU teacher education program is approved by the State Board of Education as a Center for Professional Development and Technology. One requirement for being a center is that there be field-basing within the teacher preparation program. Those courses that have a field-based component require students to interact with public school students and teachers at a public school site. Certification Nothwithstanding the fact that a student has been retained in teacher education to the point of completing all academic requirements, University recommendation for certification of the candidate is contingent upon evidence of having fulfilled all requirements and standards of the teacher education program of the unviersity. This is determined by a final review of the candidate's complete record as concerns: (1) academic record, (2) student teaching, (3) professional ethics, and (4) passing the required state mandated TExES examinations. The HSU Certification Officer recommends graduates to the State Board for Educator Certification/TEA for certification when all certification requirements have been met. No student is eligible to be recommended for certification if he/she has a grade of D or unsatisfactory in his/her area(s) of preparation/teaching field(s), PSYC 3333, or in any course in pedagogy and professional development. Certification and/or eligibility for certification are NOT requirements for graduation. Accreditation Hardin-Simmons University teacher preparation program is accredited annually by The Texas Education Agency. Accreditation is based on meeting and/or exceeding the minimum pass rates on the TExES examinations. The State Board for Educator Certification, Office of Accountability has assigned Hardin-Simmons University Irvin School of Education teacher preparation program a rating of "Accredited" under the Accountability System for Educator Preparation authorized by Texas Education Code 21.045 every year since rating of teacher preparation entities has been assigned. Detailed information related to accountability and Title II report can be accessed at the www.sbec.state.tx.us. Details related to specific courses required in each of the teacher preparation programs and course descriptions can be accessed in the current Hardin-Simmons Undergraduate Catalog. [-]

Bachelor in Music

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

The School of Music serves as a professional school offering Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees to prepare students for careers in music education, church music, performance, and theory/composition. [+]

The School of Music serves as a professional school offering Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees to prepare students for careers in music education, church music, performance, and theory/composition. A Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music general studies or with an emphasis in Music Business is also offered for those students interested in greater concentration in liberal arts. In addition, the School of Music provides opportunities for creative, culturally enriching experiences for the university community. Emphasis is on academic excellence, creativity, and aesthetic and spiritual growth. Admissions & Scholarships Music Scholarships are available to all students regardless of major. Students wishing to major in music must apply for admission to the School of Music. All students seeking a degree in music must complete an audition. Your audition time will be limited to 12 minutes. All those auditioning will be considered for a music scholarship. No additional audition is required. Ensembles School of Music ensembles are committed to the highest standards of performance. They have received great acclaim across the globe. The large ensembles are open to all students regardless of their major. [-]

Bachelor in Psychology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

Understanding the basic principles that guide human behavior can help us to live more successfully in this world. The Undergraduate Psychology Program is focused on providing our students with a strong foundation in these principles. [+]

Understanding the basic principles that guide human behavior can help us to live more successfully in this world. The Undergraduate Psychology Program is focused on providing our students with a strong foundation in these principles. We teach students how to investigate and think about "wonderfully made" persons by integrating: the biological dimensions interpersonal/social contexts psychological perspectives Given this broad focus, a major or minor in psychology can be of great value to students who wish to combine this knowledge with studies from other disciplines such as business, communications, criminal justice, philosophy, sociology, social work, speech pathology, and religion. As well, our undergraduate program provides an excellent foundation for those students who plan to pursue an advanced degree in psychology or counseling. Former students who have maintained their grades have been accepted to Master's and Doctoral degree programs throughout the country. Finally, the department of Psychology & Counseling also offers a Master's degree in Clinical Counseling & Marriage and Family Therapy which prepares students for licensure and practice as a therapist in a variety of settings. [-]

Bachelor in Theology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Abilene

Exploring God's call to ministry in your life presents exciting prospects and decisions. The choice of a school where you will continue your preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry is one of the most important you will make. Our desire is that you will have a clear sense of direction as you take the next steps in response to God's call. Let me take a moment to explore with you reasons for choosing Logsdon. [+]

The Logsdon School of Theology I am very grateful for your interest in Logsdon School of Theology. Exploring God's call to ministry in your life presents exciting prospects and decisions. The choice of a school where you will continue your preparation for a lifetime of service in ministry is one of the most important you will make. Our desire is that you will have a clear sense of direction as you take the next steps in response to God's call. Let me take a moment to explore with you reasons for choosing Logsdon. First, you will study with an outstanding theological faculty. The Logsdon faculty embodies the highest level of academic scholarship with a deep passion for the church. Each faculty member has outstanding academic credentials, but also brings a wealth of experience through serving local churches to the classroom. At Logsdon we believe that theological education must engage both mind and spirit. We place a priority upon spiritual formation as well as thorough academic training. Our classes are intentionally small so that students truly get to know their professors. Students and faculty also interact outside the classroom through worship experiences, special conferences on campus, and social gatherings. The Logsdon Master of Divinity program provides the necessary preparation to enter vocational ministry. We offer five tracks that allow a student to specialize his/her training in response to God's calling: Pastoral Ministry, Educational Ministry, Family Ministry, Spiritual Care Ministry, and Missions and Cross Cultural Ministry. Each track provides the learner with essential knowledge from the classical disciplines – biblical, theological, and ministry – while also developing necessary skills for ministry in the 21st century. We combine quality classroom experiences with ministry-based learning in order to prepare our students for serving God's Kingdom. Abilene, the gateway to "The Big Country," is a regional center for west and central Texas with many fine churches located throughout the area. Logsdon also offers a Master of Arts in Religion designed for those seeking an advanced degree in religion. This degree is ideal for those contemplating further graduate study. The beautiful facilities of Logsdon are located in the heart of a vibrant university. Students and their families can enjoy the cultural events afforded by the university, including concerts, theater, and athletics. The university environment provides a rich environment for dialogue with other academic disciplines as part of the Logsdon experience. As you prayerfully consider where to continue your preparations for a lifetime of ministry, I hope you will explore fully the opportunities that await you at Logsdon. We are a committed community of people who are vitally engaged in equipping people to fulfill God's call upon their life. We invite you to join us, and stand ready to assist in every way we can. Sincerely, Don Williford - Dean, Logsdon School of Theology [-]