University of Toronto

Introduction

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

Mission

The University of Toronto is committed to being an internationally significant research university, with undergraduate, graduate and professional programs of excellent quality.

Purpose of the University

The University of Toronto is dedicated to fostering an academic community in which the learning and scholarship of every member may flourish, with vigilant protection for individual human rights, and a resolute commitment to the principles of equal opportunity, equity and justice.

Within the unique university context, the most crucial of all human rights are the rights of freedom of speech, academic freedom, and freedom of research. And we affirm that these rights are meaningless unless they entail the right to raise deeply disturbing questions and provocative challenges to the cherished beliefs of society at large and of the university itself.

It is this human right to radical, critical teaching and research with which the University has a duty above all to be concerned; for there is no one else, no other institution and no other office, in our modern liberal democracy, which is the custodian of this most precious and vulnerable right of the liberated human spirit.

Objectives of the University of Toronto

The University of Toronto is determined to build on its past achievements and so enhance its research and teaching. The University anticipates that it will remain a large university. It will continue to exploit the advantages of size by encouraging scholarship in a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, sciences and the professions. It will continue to value its inheritance of colleges and federated universities that give many students an institutional home within the large University. It will strive to make its campuses attractive settings for scholarly activity.

Research

The University will continue to promote high quality research. The University is committed to:

  • Providing an environment conducive to research;
  • Emphasizing research, publication and related professional contributions in defining the career expectations of professorial staff;
  • Ensuring that faculties and schools engaged in undergraduate teaching also engage in graduate teaching and research;
  • Maintaining a capacity to respond selectively to new fields of research as they emerge;
  • Requiring national and international peer assessment of the quality of its programs;
  • Collaborating with other universities, industry, business, the professions, public sector institutions and governments, where appropriate to research objectives;
  • Providing information, library and research services of the highest international standards.

Teaching

The University will strive to ensure that its graduates are educated in the broadest sense of the term, with the ability to think clearly, judge objectively, and contribute constructively to society.

The University wishes to increase its ability to attract students from elsewhere in Canada and abroad, in the belief that while these students gain an education their presence will enrich the experience of students from the local community. In all its teaching programs, the University is committed to:

  • Achieving the highest academic standards;
  • Attracting students whose abilities and aspirations match the programs available;
  • Responding to the needs of a diverse student population;
  • Providing the best possible facilities, libraries and teaching aids;
  • Insisting on the importance of teaching in the career expectations of the professorial staff, recognizing excellence in teaching and providing opportunities to improve teaching;
  • Ensuring that professorial staff normally teach both graduate and undergraduate students;
  • Continuing to attract students from other provinces of Canada and from abroad; 8 Enriching the experience of students by cooperating with and assisting them in the realization of their educational goals especially as these involve their life-long learning and career development, their physical and emotional growth and well-being, their needs, including special or temporary ones, and their cultural and recreational activities.

Campuses

At the University of Toronto, students, faculty and staff study, work and live on three campuses. With some of the most prestigious architecture and beautiful green space in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area, and more than 1,000 extracurricular activities available to students, U of T offers an extraordinary environment in which to learn and work.

The University of Toronto is situated in one of the world's most vibrant urban environments. Ranked the most diverse city in North America, Toronto and the surrounding Greater Toronto Area are dynamic, inviting areas with something for everyone. From sports teams to cultural happenings, festivals to street fairs, Toronto has it all.

There are three campuses to choose from at U of T – Downtown Toronto (St. George), Mississauga (in the west) and Scarborough (in the east).

Mississauga (UTM)

Established in 1967, the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) is U of T’s second largest division with a student population that totals over 12,000.

Featuring 15 academic departments, an Institute of Communication, Culture and Information Technology, 148 programs and 89 areas of study, UTM offers undergraduate and interdisciplinary graduate studies programs.

The campus also boasts a vibrant research environment and many of its faculty and researchers are recognized internationally for their innovative work. UTM’s award-winning facilities are situated on 225 acres of protected greenbelt along the Credit River, 33 kilometres west of U of T’s Downtown Toronto (St. George) Campus.

Downtown Toronto (St. George)

The Downtown Toronto (St. George) campus blends historical architecture and inviting green spaces as a backdrop to a truly remarkable community.

Set in the centre of Toronto, one of the world’s most dynamic and diverse cities, it is a place where students, staff and faculty engage with a vibrant academic life and countless co-curricular activities.

Just beyond the campus are the many events, neighbourhoods and industries that Toronto has to offer. From Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, an annual art festival that runs from dusk until dawn, to sports games at one of the Varsity Centre's high-performance facilities, this location is intrinsically linked with city's renowned cultural offerings to create a rich and unique experience for everyone.

Scarborough (UTSC)

Experiential education is the hallmark of the University of Toronto’s Scarborough Campus (UTSC). Students get a head start on their futures through U of T’s only co-op program as well as internships, hands-on research, community engagement and a vibrant campus life.

Located next to popular natural landmarks in Toronto’s greenest area, the UTSC campus is experiencing dynamic growth. The new Aquatics Centre and Field House represents Canada’s largest investment in amateur sport infrastructure, and will open for the Pan Am/Para Pan American Games in 2015.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

View BBAs » View BAs » View BScs » View Bachelor »

Programs

This school also offers:

Bachelor

Bachelor of Applied Science in Chemical Engineering

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Chemical engineers combine chemistry, biology, math and engineering to solve urgent problems and create innovative processes and products. As a Chemical Engineering student, you will learn to address issues with a large impact on society: the need to decrease our environmental footprint, create sustainable processes and improve human health. Our professors are at the forefront of research to develop renewable fuels and materials, use biotechnology to... [+]

Bachelor of Applied Science in Chemical Engineering Chemical engineers combine chemistry, biology, math and engineering to solve urgent problems and create innovative processes and products. As a Chemical Engineering student, you will learn to address issues with a large impact on society: the need to decrease our environmental footprint, create sustainable processes and improve human health. Our professors are at the forefront of research to develop renewable fuels and materials, use biotechnology to clean up pollution, manufacture products sustainably, create artificial organs, and fortify foods to address malnutrition. U of T ranks as the best university in Canada for chemical engineering and offers one of the top programs worldwide. In the first two years, you will gain a solid foundation in chemistry, physics, math and engineering principles. In your upper years, you can explore any of the Faculty’s six minors and choose courses in areas like bioprocess engineering, biomedical engineering, sustainable energy, water & wastewater treatment, and environmental engineering. You are also eligible to do a research project as part of the program. Your program will teach you to design, build and improve products, systems and processes. You’ll put theory into practice in our innovative courses and laboratories, including the unique Unit Operations Lab, filled with large-scale industrial equipment including a two-storey distillation column. In your fourth year, you’ll be part of a student team that will design an industrial processing plant from concept to implementation in just 10 weeks. You can also take advantage of support for summer research and opportunities to study abroad. The Core Program Year 1 of the four-year undergraduate program is designed to provide a fundamental background in all areas of engineering. Classroom lessons are reinforced with laboratory studies. Year 2 focuses on the fundamentals of chemical engineering: chemistry; heat, mass and momentum transfer; and applied mathematics. It also presents opportunities to develop skills in communications. Labs are an important part of the program. Year 3 the fundamentals are "scaled up" to applications of engineering and chemistry, including hands-on learning in our labs. Emphasis is on the design and economics of industrial units and processes. Year 4 brings it all together and lets you choose an area of interest. Emphasis is on engineering and applied science applications, as well as on plant design and a research thesis. Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Bachelor of Applied Science in Computer Engineering

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

Computer science is offered by the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto. It is primarily concerned with the progamming side of computers as well as computational theory, numerical analysis and artificial intelligence. Computer engineering is offered by the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering at U of T, which means you will be an engineer when you graduate. Computer engineering students learn the hardware and... [+]

Bachelor of Applied Science in Computer Engineering Computer science is offered by the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto. It is primarily concerned with the progamming side of computers as well as computational theory, numerical analysis and artificial intelligence. Computer engineering is offered by the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering at U of T, which means you will be an engineer when you graduate. Computer engineering students learn the hardware and software of computers. They study computer architecture and how computers can be used in industry, medicine and other systems, like communications or transit systems. They can choose from many areas of study including electronics, photonics, energy systems, electromagnetics, communication networks, nano engineering, biomedical engineering, to name just a few. The computer engineering program at U of T allows students to focus their studies in the area of computers that most interests them. The Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering is a small Faculty within the University of Toronto. As such, students get to know each other very well. They attend the same classes, work together in labs and create design projects with their fellow engineering students. What do Computer Engineers do? One of the newer engineering disciplines, computer engineers work in every sector of society and industry. They design the control systems for automated production lines, create software for digital telephone switching systems, plan and supervise the installation of a Local Area Network (LAN), and develop new operation systems for clients with specific needs. There are three options within computer engineering to choose from: communication networks, software engineering or hardware engineering. Some students prefer to include all of these areas in their program of study. The choice is up to you. Electrical and computer engineers work in a variety of fields including biomedical engineering, the aerospace industry, and intellectual property law. Many can be found in the business world where their tecnology and their problem-solving, time-management, communication and team-building skills are highly valued. Both are found in the banking and finance sectors, communications industry, power sector and IT businesses. Admissions The basic course requirements for all U of T undergraduate Engineering programs are: Grade 12 Physics, Chemistry, English, Advanced Functions and Calculus & Vectors; One other grade 12 U or M course. Students with less than four years in an English-speaking country at the time of their high school graduation will be asked to provide proof of English proficiency. Extracurricular activities are also important and applicants will be asked to list them on a Student Profile Form, which is completed online during the admission cycle. These activities can actually raise your average for admission and scholarships. You will be automatically considered for all entrance scholarships when you apply to U of T Engineering. You do not need to apply for them. Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Bachelor of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Mechanical engineers design, manufacture, and operate systems that extend our physical abilities. A mechanical engineer's work is seen every day in anything that moves. This includes designing an aircraft, planning a building's ventilation system and improving a car's fuel economy. Mechanical engineering also saves lives through bioengineering technologies. The world's first artificial heart was partially designed, manufactured and... [+]

Bachelor of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Mechanical engineers design, manufacture, and operate systems that extend our physical abilities. A mechanical engineer's work is seen every day in anything that moves. This includes designing an aircraft, planning a building's ventilation system and improving a car's fuel economy. Mechanical engineering also saves lives through bioengineering technologies. The world's first artificial heart was partially designed, manufactured and implanted using mechanical engineering principles. As a mechanical engineer, you are an innovator. You're interested in the physical principles involved in a product's design, its manufacture and assembly, it’s safe operation and final disposal. You must also consider appearance and ease of use, the costs of design, manufacture, operation and effects on the environment of your product. Robotics, automation for manufacturing, environmentally responsible power generation or any form of transportation are just some of the areas where your product can be used. In fact, it would be hard to find an area or object in everyday life that is not in some way affected by a mechanical engineer. Should You Become a Mechanical Engineer? Here are some common traits of our mechanical engineering students: Enjoy physics and math. Problem-solve creatively. Like to understand how and why things work. Have an interest in bioengineering, aerospace or robotics. Are curious about the use of alternative fuels and energy. Want to use their ideas to help solve global problems. Our Program University of Toronto and mechanical engineering is an unbeatable combination. Our world-class facilities and faculty make University of Toronto 's mechanical engineering program one of the best of its kind in Canada and internationally renowned. Beyond research, our professors are also award-winning teachers. UTMIE professors have won nearly half of the Faculty teaching awards, while making up only a third of the total professors in engineering. As Canada 's largest mechanical engineering program, we offer you an extensive range of subjects and options where you benefit from our groundbreaking research and top academics. Located in the heart of Toronto , mechanical engineering at the University of Toronto is driven to excellence by the research strengths of the department and the demands of our industry partners. Just think of how many companies have their head-offices in the Greater Toronto Area, easily accessed by you. This means great work and networking opportunities for you, too. Fundamental courses include mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, dynamics, material science plus complementary courses in the humanities. If you want, you can even get a minor as a mechanical engineer. You can do this through engineering, with bioengineering, or through Arts and Science. Essential to the curriculum is the incorporation of hands-on design. You learn and execute the fundamentals in creating great design during the first few years. Upper-year courses incorporate your knowledge of topics such as biomedical engineering, aerospace, manufacturing, product design, environmental studies, robotics, space system design and embedded microprocessors in the overall design process. Students can take two of five areas of focus, including: manufacturing, mechatronics, solid mechanics and machine design, energy and environment or bioengineering. If you select our mechatronics strand, the oldest in North America , you learn the principles of integrating electronics and software into a mechanical design in well-established labs supported by outstanding professors, support engineers and graduate students. The Professional Experience Year and the combined Bachelor of Applied Science and Master of Business Administration degrees (Skoll program) are opportunities available to all engineering students at the University of Toronto. Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Bachelor of Commerce

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

The commerce programs combine economics and the various sub-disciplines of business and management enabling students to develop analytical skills and gain knowledge of institutions. This background is useful for solving problems and making decisions in business and government environments... [+]

Bachelor of Commerce The commerce programs combine economics and the various sub-disciplines of business and management enabling students to develop analytical skills and gain knowledge of institutions. This background is useful for solving problems and making decisions in business and government environments. Commerce graduates frequently become professional accountants, economists, actuaries, financial analysts, marketing analysts, managers of firms and government, or proprietors of small businesses. Some commerce students choose to do post-graduate studies; law schools and MBA programs have been favoured by recent graduates. The Specialist Program in Accounting allows students to complete the prerequisite studies for professional accounting qualifications within the BCom. There are also Specialist Programs in Finance and Marketing. Commerce students have the opportunity to participate in an international exchange program during third year. This is an excellent opportunity for students to enhance their university experience through living and studying in a new and different environment. Exchange programs give commerce students valuable international experience necessary in today's global marketplace. Commerce is a deregulated fees program and, therefore, tuition fees for students enrolled in this program are higher than for other regulated fee programs. Fees are charged on a program and not a per course basis. Professional Skills Development Program (PSDP) The Professional Skills Development Program (PSDP) has been created exclusively for Commerce and BBA/Management students as a way to encourage skill development beginning in the second year through to final year. The information and skills gained through participation in this program will help students to: Strengthen technical and soft skills necessary for workplace success. Increase awareness of marketability on the job market and confidence in abilities Effectively make the transition from school to the workplace Manage their career by navigating through the working world more effectively By participating in the program, students will be officially recognized and rewarded for their co-curricular activities through a transcript notation. Students will need to earn a minimum of at least 46 PSDP skill points over the course of their academic program. Upon completion of this requirement, students can submit an application to the PSDP Advisory Committee for transcript notation consideration. NOTES: The Program requirements in effect at the time the student is admitted to the program must be met in order to fulfill the Degree requirements. No more than 15.0 credits from MGD, MGM, MGT, RSM and ECO, combined, for degree credit. STA248H5, 250H1, 256H5, 257H5, 258H5, 260H5, 261H5 are counted as ECO courses. Students interested in combining a BCom degree with an Economics Specialist Program should refer to the appropriate Program of Study for details. Students are encouraged to take one course towards the Distribution Requirement in First Year. During the Fall-Winter session, Commerce students must take ECO204Y5 and 209Y5. They will not have access to ECO200Y5 or 202Y5. Mississauga (UTM) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

Architecture is both a profession and a discipline of study, relating to a broad spectrum of career opportunities. As a profession it plays a pivotal role in the production of the built environment, bridging the technical and social, practical and theoretical. It is a cultural and artistic practice that is critically engaged with the forces of urbanization and technological change, the challenges of environmental... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies Architecture is both a profession and a discipline of study, relating to a broad spectrum of career opportunities. As a profession it plays a pivotal role in the production of the built environment, bridging the technical and social, practical and theoretical. It is a cultural and artistic practice that is critically engaged with the forces of urbanization and technological change, the challenges of environmental sustainability, and the struggle for cultural expression. It involves the design, production, and organization of material culture from the scale of domestic objects to the scale of the metropolitan region. As such, studies in architecture interact with numerous related disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, as well as engineering, technology, and media. These studies may lead to professional graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, planning and urban design, as well as careers in related design disciplines, the arts, history, business, journalism, and public policy. Honours Bachelor of Arts, Architectural Studies: Two Honours Bachelor of Arts majors in architectural studies are offered by the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts and Science. The architectural studies programs provide degree options for students wishing to study architecture as part of a liberal arts education. The programs serve as an introduction to the discipline of architecture, focusing on the state of the art, current issues and emerging practices, all considered from critical, theoretical and historical perspectives. Studio courses in design and visual communications provide opportunities to learn practical, formal and analytical skills, and are augmented by advanced courses in allied design arts, such as landscape, furniture, graphic, and stage design. The Architectural Studies Major Program allows a choice between concentrations in architectural design or in history, theory, and criticism. The architectural design concentration is intended for students wishing exposure to architectural design within a broad liberal arts education while the history, theory, and criticism concentration is intended for students wishing a broad interdisciplinary education in architectural studies but not wishing to pursue design. Introductory courses begin at the first-year level and lead into a sequence of courses in architectural design and representation, history, theory and technology. Emphasis is placed on advanced theory and interdisciplinarity, since contemporary architecture is inexorably tied to knowledge and practice in urbanism, environmental studies, literature, media, cultural theory, art, science and technology, as well as philosophy, economics and political science. This program could be combined with a major in another discipline, for example fine art, urban studies or book and media studies. Graduates who have completed this program and have a BA degree may apply to graduate professional programs in architecture. Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

The Rotman Commerce Program

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

Offered jointly by the Rotman School of Management and the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Arts and Science, our program provides a balanced approach to business that is unique within undergraduate business education in Canada. In pursuing your BCom with us, you will receive a solid grounding in management fundamentals, while having the freedom to choose from a flexible and innovative curriculum. [+]

Offered jointly by the Rotman School of Management and the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Arts and Science, our program provides a balanced approach to business that is unique within undergraduate business education in Canada. In pursuing your BCom with us, you will receive a solid grounding in management fundamentals, while having the freedom to choose from a flexible and innovative curriculum. You’ll spend your first year getting introduced to the major areas of business study, as well as exploring subjects that appeal to you in the arts and sciences. In your second year, you will pick a specialization in one of three core areas: Accounting, Finance and Economics, or Management. Depending on your own personal interests, you may also choose to minor or major in a second subject. Your third and fourth years will be spent in advanced courses to satisfy your specialist, major or minor (if applicable), and elective requirements. In addition, your academic program will be complemented throughout by extensive professional and personal learning opportunities, as well as many extracurricular programs, events, and workshops organized by our Rotman Commerce staff and our student groups. Specialists The Bachelor of Commerce from Rotman Commerce is a four-year Honours program degree granted by the Faculty of Arts & Science. To obtain your BCom, you will need to fulfill a number of requirements, including a Commerce Specialist program. Each Specialist program has specific courses that must be completed in order to meet the requirements for its Specialist designation. Typically, students complete the requirements in four years. Specialist in Accounting The Rotman Commerce Accounting Specialist program exists to provide in-depth accounting education to students wishing to pursue careers or graduate studies in accounting. Starting in the 2013-2014 academic year, students enrolled in the specialist must choose one of the following two streams: Public Accounting or Financial Reporting and Control. Specialist in Finance and Economics The Specialist in Finance and Economics is designed for those who wish to pursue graduate studies or a career in finance or economics. Faculty are drawn from the Rotman School of Management – the leading business school in Canada for finance – and the Faculty of Arts and Science, which boasts the nation’s top-ranked economics department. Moreover, Rotman Commerce is a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Institute Program Partner, an internationally recognized designation certifying that the Rotman BCom has covered the generally accepted body of knowledge required by CFAs. Specialist in Management The Specialist in Management is for students who are interested in management education more broadly. Students pursuing the Management Specialist may choose to concentrate in one of five areas: Innovation and Entrepreneurship, International Business, Leadership In Organizations, Marketing, or Strategy. The flexibility of this program provides students with the room to pursue a minor, or even a second major within the Faculty of Arts and Science. International Study Opportunities Students wanting a global perspective on business can take advantage of our extensive international study opportunities offered in over a hundred countries around the world. Rotman Commerce, in conjunction with UofT’s Centre for International Experience (CIE), offers a variety of full-year, semester, or summer exchange programs. Picture yourself at one of our 150 prestigious partner universities while paying UofT tuition and receiving credit towards your degree. Scholarships and bursaries are available for qualifying students from the CIE. In addition, Rotman Commerce students can participate in Woodsworth College’s Summer Abroad Program. Enrolling in these four to six-week sessions will give you the chance to gain valuable international experience in such diverse places as Hong Kong or Siena, Italy while earning credits towards your degree. These courses are taught in English (except for language courses) by UofT professors and faculty from the host universities, and offer a fantastic opportunity for you to travel while gaining credit. Whether you go for 6 weeks or a full semester, our staff are committed to helping our students take advantage of international study opportunities. Our students have studied in universities across the globe and they all agree that gaining this global perspective gives them an edge in their future careers. [-]

BSc

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Computer science is concerned in the broadest sense with the study of computation and applications of computing. Its development has been stimulated by collaborations with many areas including engineering, the physical and life sciences, mathematics and statistics and commerce. However, computer science is much more than a set of techniques used in these application areas. Computer science as a discipline encompasses a wide range of research areas... [+]

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Computer science is concerned in the broadest sense with the study of computation and applications of computing. Its development has been stimulated by collaborations with many areas including engineering, the physical and life sciences, mathematics and statistics and commerce. However, computer science is much more than a set of techniques used in these application areas. Computer science as a discipline encompasses a wide range of research areas. For example, "human-computer interaction" is the study of computer usage patterns and the design of interfaces between users and computing systems. "Software engineering" includes both the process of building software and the study of software production as a business. "Systems" (networks, operating systems, databases, compilers) is concerned with the design and analysis of complex computing systems. "Numerical analysis" involves the design, testing, and analysis of numerical methods for solving computational problems in science and engineering. "Cryptography" is the study of the hiding of information. "Theory" encompasses computability - what can and cannot be computed by machines; complexity - the relative effort required to perform various computations; and verification - the formal proof of the correctness of programs. Course offerings in the Computer Science program are intended to serve a wide variety of students, ranging from those whose primary interest is in information processing to those interested in applying computing to other fields. Enrolment is restricted in all CSC specialist and major programs. CSC108H5, CSC148H5, MAT102H5 and MAT135Y5/137Y5 are the standard first year courses for students who plan to continue in a Computer Science program. Notes: All CSC programs require MAT102H5, MAT135Y5/137Y5, and CSC148H5. To take these courses, you must have obtained a minimum of 70% in Grade 12 Advanced Functions (MHF4U) or equivalent, and you must have completed Grade 12 Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U) or equivalent. A minimum of 70% in MCV4U is recommended. All CSC specialist and major programs have a writing requirement. The recommended course to satisfy that requirement is CSC290H5. All students can also satisfy the writing requirement with any of CCT110H5; ENG100H5, 110Y5; HSC200H5, 300H5; LIN204H5; WRI203H5. If a student wishes to substitute another course to satisfy the writing requirement, the student should consult the Computer Science Faculty Advisor. Students enrolled in any of the Computer Science programs are strongly encouraged to consider participating in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program. Students in any University of Toronto program may complete up to 1.5 credits of third and fourth year CSC courses. Enrolment in additional CSC courses is restricted to students in CSC specialist and major programs. CSC courses are offered on all three campuses of the University of Toronto. Some course numbers are unique to a specific campus, and others are shared between campuses. When a course with a common number is offered at U of T Mississauga, students are expected to take the course at the U of T Mississauga, even if that course is offered on a different campus in a different academic term. Due to enrolment pressures, U of T Mississauga students may not always be able to enrol in courses unique to the other campuses. We welcome inquiries from U of T students at the other two campuses about taking Computer Science courses unique to the U of T Mississauga campus. A reciprocal statement holds: Due to enrolment pressures at the U of T Mississauga campus, U of T students from the other two campuses may not be able to enrol in courses unique to the U of T Mississauga campus. For courses in this area see: CCT Communication, Culture, Information and Technology CSC Computer Science ENG English HSC Biomedical Communications LIN Linguistics MAT Mathematics STA Statistics WRI Professional Writing and Communication Scarborough (UTSC) campus Mississauga (UTM) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology

Campus Full time 5 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Biotechnology has been practised by human society since the beginning of recorded history in such activities as baking bread, brewing alcoholic beverages, or breeding food crops or domestic animals. In modern society, biotechnology is the application of scientific knowledge associated with molecular biology, genomes and proteins for the enhancement or protection of organisms. The Biotechnology industry hopes to enhance the future potential... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology Biotechnology has been practised by human society since the beginning of recorded history in such activities as baking bread, brewing alcoholic beverages, or breeding food crops or domestic animals. In modern society, biotechnology is the application of scientific knowledge associated with molecular biology, genomes and proteins for the enhancement or protection of organisms. The Biotechnology industry hopes to enhance the future potential of biotechnology with respect to drugs, agriculture, forest and environmental products. This specialist program in Biotechnology offers students a firm grounding in the science of biotechnology and a thorough understanding of the industry, and its social and ethical implications in a global framework. Faculty are drawn from the Biology and Chemistry departments, with cooperation from the Faculty of Management. Degree Requirements The degree received depends upon the combination of programs a student completes and specific degree requirements. Consult an academic advisor in the Office of the Registrar regarding degree requirements. Exceptions to degree requirements may only be granted by petition through the Office of the Registrar. Consult the departmental program advisors regarding program requirements. Departmental program advisors may only grant exceptions to program requirements that are not needed towards fulfilling degree requirements. To qualify for an Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) degree, a student must meet the following requirements: COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Obtain standing in at least 20.0 credits (i.e. complete with a grade of 50% or more or CR), meeting the following criteria: No more than 6.0 credits may be 100 level; At least 6.0 credits must be 300/400 level (no more than 1.0 300/400 level transfer credit may be counted with the exception of courses taken through an official university exchange program); and No more than 15.0 credits may have the same three-letter designator (e.g. "ANT," "ENG," etc.). DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS: Complete the distribution requirement, which consists of at least 1.0 credit from each of the following divisions: Humanities, Sciences, Social Sciences. Each course in the calendar has a distribution assignment to help you select courses that fulfill these requirements. GRADE REQUIREMENT: Achieve a Cumulative GPA of 1.85 or more by the time of graduation. Students who meet all the requirements for the Honours BA/Honours BSc except for the GPA requirement may elect to graduate with a 4-year BA/BSc degree provided they are in Good Standing (i.e. CGPA is 1.50 or more). PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR AN HONOURS BSc DEGREE: O ne specialist in a Science area, OR Two Major programs in a Science area (two Majors must include at least 12 distinct credits), OR One Major in a Science area plus one Major in an Arts area leads to either an HBSc or an HBA -- it is the student's choice, however, the default shall be an HBSc unless notification is given to the Office of the Registrar (two Majors must include at least 12 distinct credits), OR One Major and two Minors. At least one Major, or both the Minors, must be in the Science area for an HBSc (combinations must include at least 12 distinct credits) Mississauga (UTM) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Human activity is a major cause of environmental change. Study of the dynamics of both natural and anthropogenic changes requires knowledge spanning many scientific disciplines. Recent environmental degradation such as surface and subsurface water pollution, air and soil pollution, climate change, depletion of resources, extinction of species and problems of waste disposal are all a result of the lack of understanding of... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Human activity is a major cause of environmental change. Study of the dynamics of both natural and anthropogenic changes requires knowledge spanning many scientific disciplines. Recent environmental degradation such as surface and subsurface water pollution, air and soil pollution, climate change, depletion of resources, extinction of species and problems of waste disposal are all a result of the lack of understanding of environmental systems and processes. Environmental degradation has an impact not only on human beings but on all species and most natural systems, so that its understanding requires approaches and skills from many disciplines such as biology, chemistry, geology, geography, mathematics, physics, and ecology. The following programs in Environmental Science are available at UTSC: Four Specialist Programs (Environmental Biology, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Geoscience and Environmental Physics) A Major Program in Environmental Science A Minor Program in Environmental Science Note: enrolment in the Joint Specialist Program in Environmental Science and Technology has been suspended. All Environmental Science Specialist programs (Environmental Biology, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Geoscience, Environmental Physics, and Environmental Science), in addition to the Specialist (Joint) program in Environmental Science and Technology, and the Major program in Environmental Science have earned official accreditation from Environmental Careers Organization (ECO) Canada and the Canadian Environmental Accreditation Commission (CEAC). These UTSC programs have met the national standard required to earn accredited status, which connects industry and academics in the environmental sector. Graduates of these programs are eligible to receive their Environmental Professional in Training (EPt) designation, which is a developmental certification for emerging environmental professionals. The overall purpose of the various programs in Environmental Science is to provide education and training which will produce highly qualified scientists with excellent field and laboratory experience, with a view to future employment in consulting, government, non-governmental organizations and research and teaching. Mississauga (UTM) campus Toronto (St. George) campus Scarborough (UTSC) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

U of T Mississauga's Forensic Science BSc program, the first of its kind in Canada, is designed to provide the student with an understanding of scientific analyses, theories, laboratory skills, applications, and field techniques -- while allowing the student to emphasize one particular area in greater detail. This is accomplished through the requirement of a either a Forensic Science Major program - which must be pursued together with a... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science Forensic Science is the study of physical evidence in a modern legal context. It is best defined as "science in service to the courts." There are many subfields of Forensic Science including Forensic Anthropology, Forensic Biology, Forensic Chemistry, Forensic Computer Science, Forensic Psychology, etc. The single, unifying paradigm of Forensic Science is the search for truth and the meaning of evidence in both criminal investigations and through courts of law. U of T Mississauga's Forensic Science BSc program, the first of its kind in Canada, is designed to provide the student with an understanding of scientific analyses, theories, laboratory skills, applications, and field techniques - while allowing the student to emphasize one particular area in greater detail. This is accomplished through the requirement of a either a Forensic Science Major program - which must be pursued together with a second science major program in an approved area of study OR a Forensic Science Specialist program where students pursue one of the streams of specialization. Entry into the Forensic Science programs is limited. Students are urged to read program information in this calendar very carefully. ALL students contemplating Forensic Science as their intended area of study MUST first complete the required introductory university level courses before they can apply to be considered for admission into the program. The selection of the second science major is limited. While other majors must be approved by the FSC Faculty Advisor, the following are approved: Anthropology B.Sc. with emphasis on forensic and biological anthropology Biology with emphasis on forensic biology and molecular biology Chemistry with emphasis on forensic chemistry Computer Science with emphasis on forensic computer science Psychology with emphasis on forensic psychology Each of these approved second science majors has basic departmental requirements that must be fulfilled (students must check individual departmental listings for specific second science major program requirements). In addition to these basic requirements, there are provisions for a number of options. Students are strongly advised to consult with the Forensic Science program advisor who can provide recommended courses among these options to direct student preparation for a career in their chosen field of interest. Students are also advised to consult with the individual departmental faculty student advisor for recommended guidelines for course selection within their second science major. In addition to the Forensic Science (Double) Major program, the following Forensic Science Specialist programs are available for more directed study: Forensic Anthropology; Forensic Biology; Forensic Chemistry and Forensic Psychology. Mississauga (UTM) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Neuroscience encompasses aspects of a variety of disciplines that have the common goal of understanding how the nervous system works. Techniques from constituent disciplines like anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, physiology, psychology and zoology are used to unravel some of the mysteries of the brain and its mechanisms of action. Investigators in Neuroscience have also made fundamental contributions to clinical aspects of neurodysfunction and behaviour... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience Neuroscience encompasses aspects of a variety of disciplines that have the common goal of understanding how the nervous system works. Techniques from constituent disciplines like anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, physiology, psychology and zoology are used to unravel some of the mysteries of the brain and its mechanisms of action. Investigators in Neuroscience have also made fundamental contributions to clinical aspects of neurodysfunction and behaviour. The Major Program is intended for students who wish to combine their studies of Neuroscience with other areas of interest. The Specialist Program is designed for students who have a particular interest in the Neurosciences and wish to focus their studies in this area. The Specialist (Co-operative) Program provides the student with a broad background in neuroscience, with intensive lab experience and practical experience in real job settings. In a very few instances, courses from the other campuses may be used to satisfy Program requirements. However such substitutions must be pre-approved by the Program Supervisor, in writing on an official form obtained from the Registrar's Office. Admission to Neuroscience Programs The Specialist and Major programs in Neuroscience have enrolment limits. Every year students will be admitted to the Specialist Programs in Neuroscience including Co-operative studies and the major program in NRO. Entry into these programs can be gained as follows: Direct entry: Students may be admitted directly from high school, on the basis of academic performance and must have completed math and chemistry (biology is recommended). Physics is recommended for students interested in applying to the specialist program. Students will be required to have a cumulative GPA of 2.30 or higher at the end of 1st year (i.e. at the end of the session in which they complete their 4th credit) to remain in the Specialist program. Students whose cumulative GPA at the end of 1st year is between 2.00 and 2.49 may transfer to the major program. Admission after first year: Students may apply to the program after completing a minimum of 4.0 credits including 1 credit in biology, chemistry and psychology. Admission will be based on cumulative GPA with 2.8 or higher guaranteeing admission to the Specialist program and 2.0 to the Major program. Students with lower GPAs will be considered to the extent that laboratory spaces are available for both programs. The minimum GPA used to admit these students will be determined in May (after the Winter session) and August (after the Summer session). Application for admission will be made to the Registrar through ROSI, in April/May and July/August. Neuroscience courses Priority access to Neuroscience courses will be given to Major and Specialists in Neuroscience programs and other programs requiring these courses. During the first two weeks of Fall/Winter registration, the courses will be restricted to these students. Provided space is available, the courses will be opened to other students in the third week. First-Year Students in Neuroscience BIOA01H3, BIOA02H3, CHMA10H3, CHMA11H3, PSYA01H3 and PSYA02H3 are recommended in the first year if you are intending to pursue a Specialist or Major Program in Neuroscience. For Specialists, MATA30H3 is recommended in first year and [PHYA10H3 or PHYA11H3] is recommended in the first two years. Toronto (St. George) campus Scarborough (UTSC) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Psychology is that branch of science which seeks to understand behaviour and mind. Why organisms - human and infrahuman - act as they do is one of the most compelling and longstanding questions in the history of human thought. Philosophers, artists, novelists, theologians and others have sought the answer through a variety of means. Psychology uses the methods of scientific enquiry to address the question... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Science in Psychology Psychology is that branch of science which seeks to understand behaviour and mind. Why organisms - human and infrahuman - act as they do is one of the most compelling and longstanding questions in the history of human thought. Philosophers, artists, novelists, theologians and others have sought the answer through a variety of means. Psychology uses the methods of scientific enquiry to address the question. The areas of interest encompassed by the discipline of psychology include: How humans learn, adapt, and remember; how they change over their lifetimes; how they are affected by the presence of others; how their behaviour relates to their physiological functions; how mental processes can exhibit pathologies and how these pathologies can be treated. Our course offerings in Psychology include all of these topics, covering how psychologists go about answering the important questions in each, and what we have learned about each. The Specialist Program in Psychology focuses on normal thought, feelings and behaviour whereas the Specialist Program in Mental Health Studies focuses on abnormal psychological processes. The Specialist Program in Psychology is intended both for students with a strong interest in the science of psychology and for those who wish to pursue graduate work in psychology after the first degree. The Specialist in Mental Health Studies is intended for students with a strong interest in pathologies of the mind and in their treatment. Students considering graduate study should plan to include the PSYD98Y3 (thesis course) in their undergraduate Program. Advice for First Year Students who are interested in enrolling into a psychology program should take PSY 100H1 in either the Fall or Winter terms of their first year. Successful completion of this course with a grade that meets the requirement outlined in the Arts & Science Calendar is required for entry into psychology programs. However, since our Psychology programs have limited capacity, the grade listed is only the minimum required and does not guarantee admission into any of our programs. PSY 100H1 is also the prerequisite for all second year psychology courses. Note: While there is no math requirement to enrol in PSY 100H1, admission to all Psychology Programs requires a high school Calculus course at the senior/grade 12-level. Careers The department of psychology offers research-based BSc programs that focus on the experimental and biological approaches to the discipline rather than on a clinical approach to psychology often found at other universities. Admission Information Apply to the Life Sciences admission category on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English and Calculus & Vectors are required A senior high school credit in biology is recommended Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits Toronto (St. George) campus Scarborough (UTSC) campus Mississauga (UTM) campus [-]

BA

Bachelor of Art in Economics

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

Economics deals with any issue arising out of the conflict between the demand for goods and services, and a limited supply of resources to satisfy those demands. Undergraduate training in economics familiarizes students with the discipline of economic thinking, and equips them for intelligent appraisal of contemporary economic... [+]

Bachelor of Art in Economics Economics deals with any issue arising out of the conflict between the demand for goods and services, and a limited supply of resources to satisfy those demands. Undergraduate training in economics familiarizes students with the discipline of economic thinking, and equips them for intelligent appraisal of contemporary economic problems. Economics offers programs leading to both Hon. BA and Hon. BSc degrees. First-Year Courses ECO 100Y1 - Introduction to Economics MAT 133Y1 - Calculus and Linear Algebra for Commerce MAT 135H1 - Calculus I(A) MAT 136H1 - Calculus I(B) MAT 137Y1 - Calculus MAT 157Y1 – Analysis I Advice for First Year Students intending to complete a minor, major or specialist program in any of the above programs must take two key courses: Introductory Economics: ECO 100Y1 is the relevant course for any student planning to enroll in an economics program. Students intending to study International Relations, Peace and Conflict Studies or Employment Relations, may take ECO 105Y1 instead. First-Year Calculus: All economics programs build on first year mathematics, with greater mathematical content in the specialist programs. Students planning to enroll in the Specialist program must take MAT 135H and MAT136H, or MAT 137Y. Similarly, students interested in Financial Economics should take either MAT135H and MAT136H, or MAT137Y. MAT 137Y is the minimum level of first year calculus for those interested in the joint specialist program in Economics & Mathematics. Students planning to major or minor in economics, or to take second-year or higher courses in economics, should take MAT133Y (or higher). Careers All programs in economics offer solid training for a variety of career opportunities. The specialist programs prepare students for employment in business or government, or for graduate studies in economics, business and law. Economics programs can be combined with many other disciplines (e.g., computer science, political science, geography, philosophy, sociology) to provide a strong economics background for students interested in careers in these areas. Admission Information Financial Economics or Economics & Mathematics Apply to the Physical and Mathematical Sciences admission category on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English and Calculus and Vectors are required Economics or Environmental Economics Apply to the Social Sciences admission category on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English are required Calculus and Vectors is required Mississauga (UTM) campus Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Drama

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

The program of the Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies combines high standards of practical, professional theatre training with a broad, rich, and rigorous academic program. Offering courses in dramatic literature, dramaturgy, world theatre, and critical theory and history, as well as practical streams in acting, production and design, and playwriting and directing, the Drama Centre emphasizes the integration of academic and... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Drama The program of the Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies combines high standards of practical, professional theatre training with a broad, rich, and rigorous academic program. Offering courses in dramatic literature, dramaturgy, world theatre, and critical theory and history, as well as practical streams in acting, production and design, and playwriting and directing, the Drama Centre emphasizes the integration of academic and practical work in its holistic approach to classical through contemporary theatre and performance. First-Year Courses DRM 100Y1 - Drama: Form and Style Advice for First Year DRM 100Y– Drama : Form and Style is a mandatory pre- or co-requisite for all DRM courses, including the entry points to the three practical streams: DRM 200Y – Introduction to Performance, DRM 228H – Introduction to Playwriting, and DRM 254Y – Production, all of which are open to first-year students. Acceptance into DRM 200Y is based on an audition and interview held in April and again in August; acceptance into DRM 254Y is based on an interview held in April; and acceptance DRM 228H is based on a portfolio submission due in May. Careers A Drama Major or Minor may be combined with programs in a wide variety of other fields, such as programs in languages and literature and programs such as Anthropology, Canadian Studies, Cinema Studies, Classics, Commerce, Fine Art, History, Music, Psychology, Religion, Sociology, and Women’s Studies. Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in English

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

Our degree programs and courses introduce students to the full range of literary genres and traditions in English, from eleventh-century elegies written in Old English to contemporary postcolonial novels. Courses may focus on the development of particular forms (e.g., the lyrical poem), a particular period (e.g., the Victorian age), or a particular author (Shakespeare, for instance, or Jane Austen). Students receive in-depth training in... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in English Together with the visual arts and music, literature has for millennia provided humanity with the means to depict, reflect on, and understand our existence, from the most personal details of daily life to grand philosophical or religious efforts to comprehend the world as a whole. The literary arts are essential to what it means to be human; their study necessarily plays a central role in the modern university. Our programs specifically focus on how literature in English has developed through the centuries, all over the world, and in a rich variety of different forms and modes, from oral recitations to digital media. Our degree programs and courses introduce students to the full range of literary genres and traditions in English, from eleventh-century elegies written in Old English to contemporary postcolonial novels. Courses may focus on the development of particular forms (e.g., the lyrical poem), a particular period (e.g., the Victorian age), or a particular author (Shakespeare, for instance, or Jane Austen). Students receive in-depth training in critical reading and writing skills. Perceptive and attentive reading and clear and persuasive writing are key to the craft of literary criticism, and our programs are designed to make students better critics; but these skills are equally crucial in all areas of research, business, and professional activity, and are therefore of lasting value both within and beyond the university. Courses are arranged in four levels. Courses at the 100-level are introductory; 200-level courses provide broad surveys of a genre, a national literary tradition, or a subject; 300-level courses offer more detailed investigations of texts written at particular moments, in particular places in literary history, or by particular authors; and 400-level courses are small-group, discussion-based seminars on a specific subject. First-Year Courses ENG 100H1 - Effective Writing ENG 110Y1 - Narrative ENG 140Y1 - Literature for our Time ENG 150Y1 – The Literary Tradition Advice for First Year The Department of English offers several first-year literature courses as different ways of introducing you to the study of English. ENG 100H1 does not meet the needs of students primarily seeking to develop English language proficiency and cannot be used in the fulfillment of any English program. Only one first-year course counts toward any program in English; however, a first-year course is not required. Second year English courses may be taken concurrently with ENG 110Y1/140Y1/150Y1. Careers Those qualities of mind which the study of English encourages—the ability to imagine, to analyze, to judge, to synthesize various impressions, to express complicated ideas coherently, and, in particular, the ability to write well—are of vital importance to every society. International organizations, governments of all kinds, multi-national corporations, small businesses, and the professions in general, depend upon these skills. English is widely valued as pre-professional training. Admission Information Apply to the Humanities admission category on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English, are required Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits Mississauga (UTM) campus Toronto (St. George) campus Scarborough (UTSC) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in International Relations

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

The International Relations program takes an interdisciplinary approach and includes courses offered by the departments of history, political science and economics. The program explores the enduring questions of the origins of war and the maintenance of peace, the nature and exercise of power within an international system, and the changing character of the actors (both state and non-state) who participate in the various levels of... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in International Relations The International Relations program takes an interdisciplinary approach and includes courses offered by the departments of history, political science and economics. The program explores the enduring questions of the origins of war and the maintenance of peace, the nature and exercise of power within an international system, and the changing character of the actors (both state and non-state) who participate in the various levels of international decision-making. Careers The primary function of the program is to offer students the best education available in Canada regarding the nature of international relations. Some graduate do further work in international relations at graduate school. Others seek further complementary education, for example, by attending law school, masters programs in business or public administration, teacher training, or journalism schools, in preparation for careers in the private or public sector. Advice for First Year Students interested in the International Relations specialist program must take: HIS 103Y1 - Statecraft and Strategy or the International Relations stream of Trinity One or the Pearson stream of Vic One. ECO 100Y1 - Introduction to Economics or ECO 105Y1 - Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists. Students are strongly encouraged to take ECO 100Y1 One introductory modern language course or MAT 133Y1 – Calculus and Linear Algebra for Commerce or MAT 137Y1 Calculus Students interested in the major program must take: HIS 103Y1 - Statecraft and Strategy or the International Relations stream of Trinity One or the Pearson stream of Vic One. ECO 100Y1 - Introduction to Economics or ECO 105Y1 - Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists Admission Information Apply to either the Humanities or Social Sciences admission categories on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English are required A senior high school math course is recommended. Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits Toronto (St. George) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Journalism

Campus Full time Part time 4 - 5 years September 2017 Canada Toronto + 1 more

Students in Journalism can earn an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree and an Ontario College Advanced Diploma while learning from leading academics and professionals. The program focuses on the critical thinking, research, ethics, writing and communications skills needed to examine the changing issues concerning news media, journalism and society... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Journalism Students in Journalism can earn an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree and an Ontario College Advanced Diploma while learning from leading academics and professionals. The program focuses on the critical thinking, research, ethics, writing and communications skills needed to examine the changing issues concerning news media, journalism and society. Students learn to tell the story from every angle in every media form relevant to today's audiences. Graduates take with them a portfolio demonstrating experience gained from producing a real community newspaper, online publications and internet radio, and are ready for professional careers in the media or in public and private sector communications. Get a head start on your career by combining the best in university and college education. The University of Toronto and Centennial College joint programs offer exceptional faculty at the forefront of their fields and real experience in cutting-edge environments. This program may be taken in fulfillment of the requirements of a four-year (20.0 credit) Honours B.A. Degree and requires four to five years to complete. In addition to completing the requirements for the degree, students who intend to qualify for the Advanced College Diploma from Centennial College must complete a short non-credit course on journalism career management at Centennial. Courses are taught at both U of T Scarborough and at Centennial College (The Centre for Creative Communications in East York). Centennial courses are taken during three consecutive college semesters starting in the third year of the program. Students must be registered on a full-time basis while at Centennial College. The course work may include evenings and weekends. Students must maintain a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 2.0 or higher to remain in the program. Guidelines for 1st year course selection Students intending to complete the program should include the following in their first year course selection: MDSA02H3 and JOUA01H3 & JOUA02H3 and ACMA01H3 & other courses of interest. Guidelines for computer and software selection Students accepted in the Joint Program in Journalism are advised to purchase an industry standard laptop and obtain designated software and hardware. Computer: 13-inch Apple MacBook Pro or laptop wiht Windows 7 or higher operating system which is capable of running the current version of Adobe software. Software: Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Powerpoint), 2010 or more recent version, and Adobe Photoshop (most recent version). Scarborough (UTSC) campus [-]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics

Campus Full time September 2017 Canada Toronto

Linguistics is the scientific study of human language. It encompasses theories of linguistic structure in all domains: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax), meaning (semantics), and texts or conversations (discourse). Other sub-fields of linguistics include psycholinguistics (language acquisition, language processing, learning how to read, and associated disorders, as well as the neural... [+]

Honours Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics Linguistics is the scientific study of human language. It encompasses theories of linguistic structure in all domains: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax), meaning (semantics), and texts or conversations (discourse). Other sub-fields of linguistics include psycholinguistics (language acquisition, language processing, learning how to read, and associated disorders, as well as the neural architecture underlying all of these): sociolinguistics (language variation according to region, gender, class, etc., as well as the social functions of language); historical linguistics (how languages change across time, and why); and applied linguistics (e.g. second language learning, translation, clinical linguistics). The Major Program in Linguistics is designed to help students prepare for entry into professional programs in areas with a significant language component, such as speech/language pathology, education, and language teaching. Students with a particular interest in psycholinguistics can enrol in the Specialist Program in Psycholinguistics which provides excellent preparation for entry into postgraduate programs in speech/language pathology, psycholinguistics and education. The Specialist Program in Linguistics is designed for students who are interested in a more intensive study of linguistics or entry into a graduate program in linguistics. Guidelines for 1st year course selection Students intending to complete the Specialist Program in Psycholinguistics should include the following in their first year course selection: LINA01H3, LINA02H3, PSYA01H3, PSYA02H3. Students intending to complete the Specialist or Major Program in Linguistics should include LINA01H3 and LINA02H3 and should consider including a language course. Students intending to complete the Minor Program in Linguistics should include LINA01H3 and LINA02H3. Advice for First Year All of the Linguistics programs require LIN 100Y1 as a first year course. The Linguistics specialist program requires two years of a non-Germanic, non-Romance language. It is recommended that you begin the study of this language in your first year. Linguistics naturally combines as a major or minor with many disciplines, including, but not limited to, Psychology, Philosophy, Computer Science, Cognitive Science, French, Spanish and Portuguese, Slavic languages, German and Italian. Careers Linguistics is an important element in the study of speech pathology. Students of linguistics are good writers, and are more sensitive to language matters. Computational linguists, who work in such fields as natural language processing or voice recognition, are in high demand. Admission Information Most student study linguistics for the first time at university, there are therefore no specific high school prerequisites for the first year Linguistics course. Exposure to languages other than English either through high school courses or at home might help you in linguistics, but is not necessary. Since most people rarely think about the languages they speak, linguistics will be an eye-opener! Apply to the Humanities admission category on the St. George campus Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English are required Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits Scarborough (UTSC) campus Toronto (St. George) campus Mississauga (UTM) [-]

BBA

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management (BBA)

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 Canada Toronto

The University of Toronto Scarborough offers the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree to students who complete one of the Specialist Programs in Management. We also offer a Co-operative version of the Management Program as well as a non-Co-op Certificate in Business... [+]

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management (BBA) The design of the curriculum in Management is guided by our mission statement, which follows: "The mission of the Department of Management at the University of Toronto Scarborough is to provide our students with the best pre-professional undergraduate management education in Canada. With special emphasis on our co-op model of education, we aim to provide a coherent set of learning experiences that simultaneously teaches management skills and develops the capacity to think analytically about managerial, economic and societal problems and opportunities. Our faculty engages in nationally and internationally recognized research which advances the frontiers of knowledge, serves the interests of our community, and brings new insights to our students. We will improve our students' current and future experiences by building and maintaining close links with private and public sector organizations, by helping students to bridge the gap between education and employment, and by providing a continuing and lively connection among current and former students of the Department." The University of Toronto Scarborough offers the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree to students who complete one of the Specialist Programs in Management. We also offer a Co-operative version of the Management Program as well as a non-Co-op Certificate in Business. Limited enrolment Because of pressures of demand for places, it has been necessary to place enrolment limits on most Management courses including those given in the summer session, and on admission to Programs. Information on how to apply for admission to a Program and to limited enrolment courses will be available prior to the end of classes in April. Prerequisites Students are responsible for ensuring that they have the prerequisites for all Management courses. Students who knowingly or unwittingly register for courses for which they do not have the necessary prerequisites will be denied access to those courses. Students are reminded that an SDF (Standing Deferred) in a course is considered as not meeting the prerequisite for the subsequent course. Management Programs The degree offered to management students (Co-op and Non-Co-op) is the BBA - all BBA programs have a Co-op option. Students qualify for the BBA by completing one of the specialist programs in Management. BBA students are not permitted to request either the Major Program in Economics for Management Studies or the Minor Program in Economics for Management Studies. Admissions Each year, 400 students will be admitted to the Specialist Programs in Management including Co-operative studies. There are three possible ways to be admitted to the Specialist Programs. Students interested in Co-op should also refer to additional application information in the following Co-op Programs section. Directly from Secondary School - Most of the students will be admitted directly from high school, on the basis of academic performance. Applicants interested in the Specialist Programs in Management must have completed Grade 12 English and Grade 12 Calculus. At the End of First Year - Pre-program students will be considered for admission to the various BBA programs at the end of the winter session of their first year. A second round of admissions takes place at the end of the following summer session. The minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) to guarantee admission to Non-Co-op BBA is calculated annually. For this year, it will not be greater than 3.3. Typically the cut-off for admission to Co-op will be higher than the cut-off for admission to Non-Co-op. Applicants for the Specialist Programs in Management must have completed at least 4.0 credits at the University of Toronto. Courses completed must include MGTA01H3/(MGTA03H3) and MGTA02H3/(MGTA04H3) MGEA02H3/(ECMA04H3), MGEA06H3/(ECMA06H3), MATA32H3 & MATA33H3. MATA32H3 & MATA33H3 are strongly recommended, however MATA30H3/A31H3 and MATA35H3/A36H3/A37H3 may also be used to satisfy the calculus requirement. Decisions will be made when all grades are received. To be considered for admission to the BBA program, a student must request a Management subject post on ROSI. There are two rounds of admission each year. Application for admission will be considered only for the round during which the student has made the subject post request. Late Admission - A limited number of places in the BBA will be available to students beyond the two application periods described in the previous section. Students may apply until they have completed up to 10.0 full credits, and admission will be on the basis of all grades received. Students who have completed more than 10.0 full credits will not be considered for admission to the Programs. Since the number of students accepted in this category is very limited, students who are denied admission after first year (in the periods at the end of the winter session and the end of the summer session in first year) are strongly advised to visit the Academic Advising & Career Centre to explore alternative program options. Scarborough (UTSC) campus [-]