Bachelor Program in Green Bay USA

Top Bachelor Programs in Green Bay USA 2017

Bachelor

Bachelor degrees from accredited colleges and universities can be important stepping-stones toward a successful career.The most common type of undergraduate program is a bachelor's degree, usually awarded after four years of successful study

A Bachelor is a popular college degree that is pursued by students who want to gain knowledge in a specific area of study. Completed in three to five years, it is available in a variety of study disciplines.

Education in the United States is mainly provided by the public sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: state, local, and federal, in that order. The common requirements to study at a higher education level in United States will include your admissions essay (also known as the statement of purpose or personal statement), transcript of records, recommendation/reference letters, language tests

Green Bay is a city in Wisconsin well-known as the home town of the Green Bay Packers, an NFL team. Green Bay is known as one the most vibrant, concentrated and supportive NFL football towns in the United States.

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Bachelor in Biology

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The Biology program provides insights into living systems from the sub-cellular level to the ecosystem level. The <strong>Biology major</strong> prepares students for careers in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, plant and animal biology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and field biology. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. The Biology program provides insights into living systems from the sub-cellular level to the ecosystem level. The Biology major prepares students for careers in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, plant and animal biology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and field biology. A curriculum can be developed to prepare for medical, dental, veterinary, agriculture, or other professional schools, or for graduate study. The major also establishes a foundation for interdisciplinary careers in biological resources management, human biology, nutritional sciences, and science communications (technical writing, journalism, and nature interpretation). Biology graduates are employed in industry (pharmaceuticals, paper making, food processing, hospitals and clinics, agriculture, and others); government agencies (Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Department of Agriculture, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources); environmental consulting firms; and educational institutions. About 40 percent of Biology graduates pursue advanced degrees in graduate and professional schools. Biology majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Human Biology is the minor commonly chosen by Biology majors with interests in health sciences or exercise science. Students interested in ecology, biodiversity, and management of biological resources such as wildlife, forests, and fisheries, typically take a minor in Environmental Science. Other interdisciplinary areas that may be useful, depending upon a student's career goals, include Business Administration and Environmental Policy and Planning. Students who prefer a Biology minor (rather than a major), coupled with an interdisciplinary major, might consider majors in Environmental Science or Human Biology. Students in Education who desire to become science teachers have found the Biology major important. A particular advantage of the UW-Green Bay Biology program is the opportunity for undergraduate students to gain practical experience. Many students work with faculty on research projects. There is an active internship program with private, state and national agencies, and with industry. Such experiences are beneficial when entering the job market or seeking admission to graduate and professional schools. The program has well-equipped laboratories for teaching and student/faculty research. In cellular and molecular biology laboratories, students become familiar with techniques of tissue culture, in situ hybridization, affinity chromatography, agarose and polyacrylamide gel, electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and the use of monoclonal antibodies. In physiology laboratories, students learn techniques to study physiological functions. Teaching and research facilities available to field and ecology students include the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, the 290-acre Cofrin Memorial Arboretum on the campus, off-campus natural areas managed by the University, the Richter Natural History Museum, small animal laboratory, herbarium, greenhouse, and computer labs. Students get to practice their knowledge in both field and laboratory settings, and master basic skills including statistical analysis, various laboratory methods and techniques, and taxonomic (identification) skills. Many occupations today require a college-educated individual who can write and speak well, solve problems, learn new information quickly and work well with others on a team. Students in the Biology program develop these skills with excellence. Who should be a Biology major? Anyone who is interested in discovering how organisms function and exploring how life exists in the world should consider the Biology program. Those who have a general interest in working with the principles of math, chemistry, physics, and of course Biology should consider majoring (or having a minor) in Biology. Biology majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Students interested in areas such as resource management, field ecology, or science communication normally take a minor in Environmental Science. Human Biology is the minor commonly chosen by Biology majors with interests in health sciences or adult fitness. Other interdisciplinary areas that may be useful, depending upon a student's career goals, include Environmental Policy and Planning or Business Administration. [-]

Bachelor in Chemistry

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The <strong>UW-Green Bay chemistry program</strong> is an integrated progression of lecture and laboratory instruction that is designed to provide students with the skills needed by chemists today. [+]

The UW-Green Bay chemistry program is an integrated progression of lecture and laboratory instruction that is designed to provide students with the skills needed by chemists today. These skills include a solid understanding of chemical principles, hands-on training in the use of modern instrumentation, experience in the design of experiments and the ability to analyze data and present results. Students are encouraged to refine these skills by engaging in research. The majority of UW-Green Bay chemistry majors have opportunities to work as research assistants on faculty projects, or to conduct their own independent projects. UW-Green Bay faculty are active in research on chemical catalysis, sol-gel chemistry, natural product synthesis, alternative and renewable energy, chemistry of ultrasound, polymeric surfactant synthesis and application, mesoporous material synthesis and application, chemistry of colors (computation), photocatalysis, sensors, environmental chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology. Experience in research is very important when entering the job market and in applying to graduate and professional schools. The UW-Green Bay chemistry program is certified by the American Chemical Society (ACS). Students who want to add depth to their programs may pursue an ACS-certified major in either chemistry or environmental chemistry. Students who complete these majors are registered with the ACS and have the certification recorded on their official University credentials. Chemistry majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary major or minor. A chemistry major combined with a minor in human biology is excellent training for students aiming for professional schools in the health sciences, medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine. Environmental science would be an appropriate interdisciplinary minor for students planning careers as chemists or in environmental studies, or pursuing graduate studies in chemistry. About half of UW-Green Bay chemistry majors continue their studies in graduate or professional schools. Who Should Be A Chemistry Major? Elements - For those interested in becoming a Chemistry major, consider the following: you must have a desire to know how things work (on a chemical or atomic level); you must also have strong math skills (math is a huge component of Chemistry!); have a mechanical aptitude; have strong problem solving skills; and have good computer skills (computers are used a lot!) Minor Decisions - Chemistry majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Students aiming for professional programs in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or pharmacy, or graduate programs in biomedical sciences including biochemistry should minor in Human Biology. A minor in Environmental Science is appropriate for students planning careers in chemistry or environmental science, or graduate studies in chemistry. What You Can Do With A Major In Chemistry The Chemistry major opens doors to many different careers. Many students go onto graduate school in chemistry, biochemistry, biomedical sciences, medicine, or law. With a bachelor's degree, your imagination is the only limit with Chemistry. It's very flexible! Any company that manufactures a product will need chemistry majors! Use the following as an idea list, and remember that they represent some, but not certainly all, of the careers you might consider in Chemistry. The following list represents a few of the kinds of career titles for Chemistry majors: Agricultural Scientist, Assayer, Biochemist, Brewer Lab Assistant, Cepalometric Analyst, Chemical Oceanographer, Chemistry Technologist, College Professor, Crime Lab Analyst, Cytotechnologist, Environmental Health Specialist, Fire Protection Engineer, Food Scientist Technician, Forensic Chemist, Genetic Counselor, High School Teacher, Hospital Administrator, Hydrologist, Industrial Hygienist, Molecular Biologist, Occupational Safety Specialist, Perfumer, Pharmaceutical Sales Representative, Physician, Plastics Engineer, Product Tester, Quality Assurance Manager, Risk Manager, Science Lab Technician, Soil Scientist, System Analyst, Toxicologist, Underwater Technician, Veterinarian, Wastewater Treatment Chemist, Water Purification Chemist. [-]

Bachelor in Accounting

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

In the Accounting program you gain both the in-depth accounting knowledge and the broad background in business needed to understand the role of accounting in the business world. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. Disciplinary Both the major and minor in Accounting are disciplinary. "Disciplinary" means that all accounting students receive vigorous and thorough training in accounting. More than 90 percent of UW-Green Bay Accounting graduates typically find employment in their chosen career within six months of graduation. Alumni surveys indicate that alumni perceive the Accounting program very favorably, their program of study prepared them extremely well for their careers, the quality of the Accounting faculty is "excellent" and they would definitely recommend the program to others. Recent surveys also suggest that well over 30 percent of the Accounting graduates pass all four parts of the C.P.A. exam during their first sitting; of those who take it a second time, 75 percent pass all four parts. These figures compare very favorably with the national averages, where the first time pass rate is approximately 20 percent. These successes may be attributed to Accounting’s contemporary and rigorous curriculum, a dedication to teaching excellence and to an emphasis on the skills basic to career advancement such as effective writing, speaking, quantitative analysis, computer proficiency, decision making and problem solving. In the Accounting program you gain both the in-depth accounting knowledge and the broad background in business needed to understand the role of accounting in the business world. Accounting faculty are committed to serving the needs of business and society and to providing an outstanding learning environment. The Accounting program addresses contemporary accounting and business issues, including the role of accounting in continuous quality improvement, the implementation of computer technology, advances in accounting information systems and ac¬counting ethics. These issues and more are addressed in specific classes and throughout the curriculum. Today's business¬es require employees who are effective communicators and prob¬lem solvers with broad-based liberal educations. Accounting students take courses that develop their communi¬cation skills and they gain breadth through courses in the arts, humani¬ties, social sciences and natural sciences. Extensive opportunities are available to meet business professionals and to gain practical experience. Active student organizations, such as the Accounting Students Association, provide opportunities to meet others with like interests and to develop contacts with businesses. Participation in the internship program is strongly encouraged. Here students learn while working in an actual business setting. Many students continue working full-time for their internship sponsors upon graduation. Since the major in Accounting is a disciplinary major, the student must complete an interdisciplinary minor. Students who complete the Accounting major automatically fulfill the requirements for the minor in Business Administration. [-]

Bachelor in Economics

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The systematic study of economics helps one to better understand this complex system of markets, enterprises (profit-motivated, government, and private, not-for-profit), unions, and many other economic and political interest groups that influence the economy and the role of government. [+]

Economics is everywhere! As workers, consumers, and sometimes business owners all of us have through our daily activities gained some knowledge of how the economy functions. This knowledge, however, is not systematic and precise. The modern economy is an extremely complex system of social institutions. The systematic study of economics helps one to better understand this complex system of markets, enterprises (profit-motivated, government, and private, not-for-profit), unions, and many other economic and political interest groups that influence the economy and the role of government. Here are a few basic practical questions the study of economics helps one to understand. Why are wages and salaries so different? Some workers work for $5 per hour while others thousands of dollars per hour. Why does the price of housing different so much across cities? One can buy a very nice house in Green Bay for $200,000. That very same house would cost five or ten times more in many parts of the east and west coasts. Why do airfares differ so much for the same flight? For example, on a flight from, say, Chicago to Los Angeles in economy class, some people are paying a $200 fare while others are paying $800. Questions on a broader level include the following: - Why are countries such as the United States so rich while others are so poor? Workers in the poorest countries of the world earn only about 10 cents per hour. - What can be done to improve their standard of living? And even in rich countries such as the United States, 12 to 15 percent of the population lives in poverty. - What can be done to improve the lives of the poor? - Why is it that some countries at times have had inflation rates of 10,000 percent or even more than one million percent per year whereas others tend have inflation rates of one or two percent. - Why is it that the unemployment rate fluctuates from year to year and sometime economic recessions and depressions arise? - And can the government successful fight high unemployment? If so, how? - Economics used to be called “political economy” and for good reason. Most political issues are linked, directly or indirectly, to economics. Resources are scare and political choices must be made. Should more or less money be spent on the military? Or should more resources be devoted to health care, education, a cleaner and more sustainable environment, and so on? Should the legal minimum wage be raised? Should taxes be raised or lowered? But there are many taxes. For example, there is the personal income tax, the payroll tax, the corporate income tax, various sales and excise taxes, tariffs, and inheritance taxes, to name a few. Any tax changes will have different impacts on the efficiency of the economy as well as the distribution of income and wealth. In short, there are an endless number of questions that voters and politician must decide on. Consequently, studying economics helps a person become a more informed voter. Finally, studying economics will help a person make better economic decisions throughout their life. Two key questions of personal finance are very relevant to everyone. Throughout your life you will faced with choices with respect to various kinds of insurance products. But there are many kinds of insurance: auto insurance, health insurance, homeowners insurance, life insurance, etc. The costs and benefits of these insurance products require significant economic knowledge. Moreover, studying economics will greatly help you make better saving and investment decisions. Again, these are rather difficult decisions but good saving and investment decisions can greatly increase your wealth. For example, the yearly income of the average American household is about $52,000. If a household can save some $8,000 per year and invest this amount in broadly diversified investments in 30 to 40 years their wealth is likely to range from $500,000 to $1.5 million. One must note, however, that economics as a discipline is far broader than the economy itself. At the most fundamental level, economics is the study of human choices and behavior grounded on the crucial assumption that humans choose with a purpose and consequently respond to incentives, economic and noneconomic. Consequently, in recent decades economics has become increasingly interdisciplinary. Economists have increasingly made important contributions in many other social and behavioral sciences including history, sociology, political science, and geography. Likewise, the methods and insights of other disciplines have been increasingly introduced into economics. Psychology is most prominent in this respect. Indeed, just a few years ago a leading psychologist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics. Moreover, an examination of the Nobel Prize contributions over the last several decades shows that approximately 40% of the winners have received their award for research clearly outside the conventional boundaries of economics. [-]

Bachelor in Music

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The Music program is a leader in the performing arts at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay providing a musical education grounded in performance, historical, and cultural contexts. The program offers music courses to all University students to broaden their understanding and enjoyment of music as a fine art. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. The Music program is a leader in the performing arts at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay providing a musical education grounded in performance, historical, and cultural contexts. The program offers music courses to all University students to broaden their understanding and enjoyment of music as a fine art. We offer a comprehensive array of experiences that can be individualized within the context of an outstanding liberal arts education and the amenities of a multifaceted university. Music ensembles are open to all university students who successfully audition. Great musical experiences and a fine music education begin with an outstanding faculty. At UW Green Bay students have the opportunity to study with experts on their instrument or voice. Our faculty of professional musicians are creative artists who make teaching their first priority. Being a musician requires not only talent, desire, and hard work, but it also requires an environment in which you can develop your musical talents to their fullest. The UW Green Bay Music program provides a supportive environment along with the thorough education you need to succeed. A fully accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM), the Music program offers two degrees, a professional degree – the Bachelor of Music, and a liberal arts degree – the Bachelor of Arts. The Bachelor of Music in Music Education prepares students to enter the teaching profession, with Wisconsin DPI licensure available in Pre-K-12 Choral and General Music, and Pre-K-12 Instrumental and General Music. The Bachelor of Music in Performance is a professional degree that prepares students for a career in music performance or graduate study of their instrument or voice. The Bachelor of Arts degree offers the study of music in a liberal arts framework. It is intended for students who wish to major in Music as a part of a liberal arts program. The degree can help students prepare for a broad array of career options and may also be appropriate for those intending to pursue advanced study in music. With this comprehensive background, our graduates have gone on to careers as performers, teachers, arts managers, business entrepreneurs and many have furthered their education through graduate study. It is also possible to choose Music as a disciplinary minor, which provides breadth to an interdisciplinary major. The Music minor may be especially appropriate for students who have an interest in studying music, but who intend to pursue careers in other fields. The Music program maintains a strong commitment to strengthening its cooperative links with the local and regional communities, arts organizations, and music educators. The Music program serves as a cultural resource for Northeastern Wisconsin and the first introduction to the campus for thousands of secondary students. Furthermore, the Music program provides arts education as part of UW Green Bay’s comprehensive general education program and will continue to promote the University's tradition of a strong liberal arts education. Admission to the music program is contingent upon successful completion of a performance audition and a written placement exam in music theory and ear training. All entering students who do not meet the minimum standards to be majors in the department may be admitted conditionally. However, students must remove identified deficiencies within the first year of matriculation before being fully admitted into the program. Students from any academic program may participate in music courses, ensembles, and applied lessons and may fulfill General Education requirements by doing so. [-]

Bachelor in Design Arts

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The <strong>Design Arts major</strong> is geared towards students who are interested in Graphic Design, Environmental Design and the broadening field of Visual Communications. The program provides a formal education in design with an emphasis on promoting the development of problem solving and design skills that are practical, portable and enduring in rapidly changing, technologically driven, creative fields. [+]

The Design Arts major is geared towards students who are interested in Graphic Design, Environmental Design and the broadening field of Visual Communications. The program provides a formal education in design with an emphasis on promoting the development of problem solving and design skills that are practical, portable and enduring in rapidly changing, technologically driven, creative fields. The Design Arts major consists of Studio Art, Graphic Design, Environmental Design, Communications and English Composition courses. The breadth of the curriculum reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the program and is structured to promote intellectual and esthetic understanding of visual communications, environmental design and promote the development of problem solving skills. Students enrolled in upper-level courses will learn how to apply design principles to a variety of media including graphic design for print and publishing and web design. Studio courses integrate technology use and skills development in a problem-based learning environment. Students learn to use standard professional design software as tools of the design process. The environmental design studios develop design skills through the exploration of human scale problems. The studio courses have typically been centered on a variety of real-world projects that have included the design of business and living spaces, the redesign of industrial river frontage into green space and urban renewal projects to name a few. The studio projects typically have actual clients, with students responding to important community issues that require creativity based in design and problem solving methodologies. The ultimate goal of the program is to equip students with the knowledge, problem-solving ability and design skills that will enable them to make significant contributions as design professionals. [-]

Bachelor in Humanistic Studies

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The humanities comprise those fields that study human creations of all sorts. The humanities thus include literary studies, philosophy, history, (including art history and history of science), foreign languages, cultural studies (including First Nations Studies), musicology, interdisciplinary studies, and parts of fields such as psychology, anthropology, and sociology. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. The humanities comprise those fields that study human creations of all sorts. The humanities thus include literary studies, philosophy, history, (including art history and history of science), foreign languages, cultural studies (including First Nations Studies), musicology, interdisciplinary studies, and parts of fields such as psychology, anthropology, and sociology. There are two kinds of Bachelor's level degrees: a) those that train you for a specific career, and b) those that educate you to be able to be trained for a wide variety of careers. Examples of degrees that train you for a specific career are nursing, accounting, and social work. These degrees train you well to practice a specific profession, but they do not prepare you well to be trained for many other professions. Degrees that educate you, thus enabling you to be trained in a wide variety of fields, are found in the Humanities and other Liberal Arts. These degrees emphasize skills such as: - reading effectively - communicating well in both speaking and writing - thinking critically - developing research skills - learning how to learn They also emphasize perspectives like a) understanding and appreciating other cultures, and b) valuing rational thought and effective analysis. Employers have found that people with degrees in the Humanities are among the most flexible and best able to learn how to do a job. People with degrees in the Humanities tend to climb higher and faster in whatever career track they choose than do people trained in particular fields. The Humanistic Studies internship program will place you in a good learning situation in a local business or agency allowing you to build your resume while getting credits. With a Humanistic Studies major or minor you learn to understand and appreciate the greatest works that human beings have produced and set yourself on a road to a fulfilling and satisfying life. Who should be a Humanistic Studies major? Students who are interested in investigating human values by studying and discussing their expressions in history, literature, art, and philosophy should consider Humanistic Studies. Also, those who have a passion for ideas and culture, and who enjoy reading would be ideal for this program. If you are looking for a well-rounded education that will prepare you for a variety of careers, then this program is right for you! Humanistic Studies is a natural accompaniment to majors or minors in First Nations Studies, History, Philosophy, English, French, German or Spanish as well as to minors in Global Studies and Women's Studies. Humanistic Studies also complements such areas of study as Business, Psychology, Sociology, Political Science, and the natural sciences. [-]

Bachelor in Psychology

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 USA Green Bay + 1 more

Psychology is the systematic and scientific study of behavior and experience. It seeks to explain how physiological, personal, social, and environmental conditions influence thought and action. Research with humans aims to understand, predict, and influence behavior. [+]

Psychology is the systematic and scientific study of behavior and experience. It seeks to explain how physiological, personal, social, and environmental conditions influence thought and action. Research with humans aims to understand, predict, and influence behavior. Overview In the past century, psychology has moved from being a branch of philosophy to being both an experimental science and an active helping profession. It has developed several specialized sub-areas with foci spanning from the level of the nerve cell (e.g., the neural basis of memory) to that of society (e.g., the developmental consequences of the Head Start program). A strong grasp of psychology requires knowledge of the approach and content of each of its sub-areas. Students gain this understanding by completing courses in the four main cores: Physiological/Cognitive, Social/Personality, Developmental, and Clinical. They choose additional courses to meet individual needs with the help of a psychology adviser. Furthermore, students who major in psychology learn to evaluate research articles and to design, conduct and report experiments. The Psychology Program: Our graduates are employed in a variety of positions with social and community service agencies, businesses, research firms, and governmental agencies. The program offers several special opportunities for students to strengthen their professional preparation: faculty frequently work with students on collaborative research projects, and many of our students present papers at national conferences. Support for advanced student research is enhanced by a state-of-the-art Social Sciences Lab. Internships are available in a variety of community settings. Should You Major/Minor in Psychology? Look at the Careers Link to see if psychology is the right major or minor for you. Psychology majors must choose an interdisciplinary minor. Such a minor strengthens preparation in psychology and enables students to prepare for a diversity of careers. Human development is the most chosen minor, though a number of minors are also completed in human biology, business, and in the social science interdisciplinary programs. Learning Outcomes Goal 1: Knowledge Base in Psychology 1.1 Describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology 1.2 Develop a working knowledge of psychology’s content domains 1.3 Describe applications of psychology Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking 2.1 Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena 2.2 Demonstrate psychology information literacy 2.3 Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem-solving 2.4 Interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological research 2.5 Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry Goal 3: Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World 3.1 Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice 3.2 Build and enhance interpersonal relationships 3.3 Adopt values that build community at local, national, and global levels Goal 4: Communication 4.1 Demonstrate effective writing for different purposes 4.2 Exhibit effective presentation skills for different purposes 4.3 Interact effectively with others Goal 5: Professional Development 5.1 Apply psychological content and skills to career goals 5.2 Exhibit self-efficacy and self-regulation 5.3 Refine project-management skills 5.4 Enhance teamwork capacity 5.5 Develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation [-]

Bachelor in Human Development

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

Human Development is an interdisciplinary program that explores human growth, development, and change, and that conceptualizes it as a lifelong process. The process occurs in multiple and diverse contexts and involves biological, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. Human Development is an interdisciplinary program that explores human growth, development, and change, and that conceptualizes it as a lifelong process. The process occurs in multiple and diverse contexts and involves biological, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development. Human Development is a suitable major or minor for students who plan any type of career that involves working with people and helping to solve human problems. Because it is a liberal arts major, career possibilities are varied, but many options fall within the broad areas of human services, education, and business. Alumni have worked as staff members of a domestic violence shelter, case managers at a social service agency, and as employees for advocacy groups such as AARP. Other graduates are involved in education-related careers, such as educational support, daycare and preschools, and college admissions. Another area in which many majors seek jobs is the business world, whether in sales, customer service, or even human resources. Human Development students also pursue graduate and professional training in fields such as human development and family studies, gerontology, community and public health, higher education/student affairs, marriage and family therapy, law, and other fields. Admission is highly selective and requires very strong academic credentials. Faculty advisers can help students tailor their choice of academic plan and electives to their individual career goals. As just one example, although a minor is not required to graduate with a Human Development major, minors or double-majors in such areas as Business, Human Biology, Public and Environmental Affairs, Women's and Gender Studies, and Psychology may be helpful when pursuing some specific career objectives or applying to certain types of graduate school programs. One particular advantage of the Human Development program is the opportunity for undergraduate students to gain practical experience, and many work with faculty on independent research projects or as research assistants or teaching assistants. Human Development strives to educate students who are committed to and engaged in their communities. Therefore, students are strongly encouraged to complete an internship in an approved community agency or to seek applied experience through part-time employment or volunteer work. All of these experiences are also beneficial when entering the job market or seeking admission to graduate and professional schools. So you want to be a Human Development major? Great! But first there are a few things to consider before you declare your major. - Ensure you have a firm sense of why you want to be a Human Development major. - Examine the course requirements and suggested timeline for taking courses. - Explore the career options. - Be aware of the independent study options. - Identify your advisor. - Carefully follow the instructions for declaring a major. - When you do declare your major, joining the Psychology/Human Development student club and doing volunteer work in the community could help you get involved and give you additional career information and directions! Who should be a Human Development major? The Human Development major can be great preparation for any type of career that involves working with people and helping to solve human problems, including many options in human service, business, and educational settings. Career possibilities are varied, and some entry-level sample jobs might include developing activities for older adults at a nursing home or for young children in an after school program, serving as a client advocate or case manager for a private human services agency, or addressing member questions and concerns for a large health insurance company. Some careers, such as college academic advisor, marriage and family therapist, development director for a non-profit organization, or human resources manager may require master's degrees or doctoral-level preparation. Admission to graduate school is highly selective and requires very strong academic credentials. Your advisor and Career Services can provide you with more information on how to prepare for careers or graduate school. [-]

Bachelor in Communication

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The Communication Department Mission is to develop core competencies in oral, written and visual communication for our interdisciplinary program. [+]

The Communication Department Mission is to develop core competencies in oral, written and visual communication for our interdisciplinary program. All students should have a basic competency in each of these areas in order to enhance their effectiveness in their chosen communication area of emphasis. Students should have a conceptual grasp of the major communication theories and the impact of technology on the communication process. Skills Acquired Selecting an area of study is an important decision because it will shape your thinking style and personal skills for the rest of your life. Listed below are many of the skills you will refine in the program. Some of the skills are more important in certain areas of emphasis than in others. Interdisciplinary Degree The Communication program is interdisciplinary and requires you to integrate a broad range of competencies, approaches, and theories. Although a minor is not required for Communication majors, we recommend a minor that complements your study such as Business Administration, Public Administration, or Communication and the Arts. Learning Outcomes Basic Competencies - Development of visual communication skills and concepts at a level appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. - Development of verbal (oral) communication skills and concepts at a level appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. - Development of written communication skills and concepts at a level appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. Critical Thinking - Development of information management skills, including searching, evaluating, organizing, and presenting information appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. - Ability to design, select appropriate methodologies, conduct, and report communication research according to standard protocols. - Understanding of legal and ethical aspects of professional communication. - Ability to plan, design, and evaluate communication strategies appropriate to message, communications medium/technology, and context. Professional Applications - Ability to collaborate with colleagues and clients in a team-based environment to analyze problems and design and evaluate solutions. - Ability to assemble, organize, and present a portfolio of professional communication materials appropriate to the student's area of emphasis. - Ability to effectively synthesize images, text, and oral communication in order to achieve a professional objective. [-]

Bachelor in Arts Management

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

Arts organizations make communities come alive – from symphonies to jazz bands, theaters to sculpture gardens, museums to community arts centers, public radio to festivals. All of that activity is made possible by arts managers. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. Arts organizations make communities come alive – from symphonies to jazz bands, theaters to sculpture gardens, museums to community arts centers, public radio to festivals. All of that activity is made possible by arts managers. Arts management can be an exciting, fulfilling career for someone who likes to be close to the arts and artists and wants to work behind the scenes to make the arts happen. Arts managers work behind the scenes to bring art and audiences together – raising funds, marketing, organizing volunteers and facilitating programs. At UW-Green Bay, Arts Management is both a major and a minor. Many students pair the Arts Management major or minor with studies in music, studio art, theatre, dance, gallery and museum practices, English, or history. We believe that successful arts managers are equally proficient in art and administration – and we also believe that the arts are a unique industry and have management challenges that are not found in other kinds of businesses. Your studies will include arts management core courses along with courses in the arts, not-for-profit management and business. An internship or other practical, real-life experience is an important part of the experience. Who should be a Arts Management Major? Arts Management is an ideal major or minor for students who like to be around the arts but are not necessarily interested in being an artist or performer. It’s also a good choice for those who are preparing for artistic careers and want to have some training in the “business side” of the arts, so that they can manage their own careers, understand the organizations that hire artists, or even be prepared to accept administrative jobs between artistic gigs. We use the term “arts management” very broadly. Students in the Arts Management Program may be majoring or minoring in other artistic disciplines such as studio art, music or theatre, but students majoring in English, history, communications, business and economics have also minored or double-majored in arts management. Many arts management majors choose to minor in an artistic discipline, but Communications, English, Humanistic Studies, and many other programs can pair well with arts management. [-]

Bachelor in Political Science

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

Political Science involves the study of government, politics, and public policy both within the United States and in other settings around the world. We are a small program, but we offer courses in American government and politics, public policy and administration, political theory, comparative politics, and international relations. [+]

Political Science involves the study of government, politics, and public policy both within the United States and in other settings around the world. We are a small program, but we offer courses in American government and politics, public policy and administration, political theory, comparative politics, and international relations. The faculty in the program are active in scholarly research and publication, and are also dedicated to teaching. In addition to the workings of government and the exercise of power, in all courses we try to develop important skills in critical thinking and analysis, and in communication of ideas. We believe these skills are essential for careers in law, government, business, journalism, and politics. The program overview link provides more information about the study of Political Science, related programs of study at UW-Green Bay, and careers for which a major or minor in Political Science is an especially suitable preparation. The links to requirements for the major or minor provide information from the University catalog. The link to resources takes you to a list of sites on the study of Political Science and opportunities for students. Learning Outcomes - Knowledge of and ability to analyze U.S. government institutions, political processes, and behavior as well as politics in select Western and non-Western countries - An ability to evaluate political institutions and processes from the perspective of democratic principles, including majority politics, the protection of minority rights, and the value of due process. - An ability to think critically and a capacity to use political science research. This includes an understanding of social science research methods and elementary statistical concepts, and the ability to use professional resources such as journals, indexes, and government documents. - To qualify for graduate study in political science, public policy, public administration, law, international affairs, or related fields or to qualify for entry level employment requiring competence in governmental and political processes, or for teaching government. - An ability to write clearly and effectively. [-]

Bachelor in Urban and Regional Studies

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

Urban and Regional Studies develops individuals who want to make a difference in their community: a difference in what happens to older neighborhoods in transition; a difference in what happens as new suburban communities are planned and built; and a difference in the lives and well-being of persons across metropolitan and rural regions. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. Urban and Regional Studies develops individuals who want to make a difference in their community: a difference in what happens to older neighborhoods in transition; a difference in what happens as new suburban communities are planned and built; and a difference in the lives and well-being of persons across metropolitan and rural regions. URS offers undergraduates an opportunity to become familiar with concepts that will be useful whether they become community organizers, lawyers, city or regional planners, architects, teachers, economic development specialists, journalists, social workers, city managers, or enter careers in business. Students are offered introductory and advanced coursework in many of the social science disciplines that contribute to the field of urban studies -- including economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology -- as well as specialized coursework such as: urban social problems, urban and regional planning, and the seminar in ethics and public action. We have a number of areas of emphasis within the program, including community development, ethnic studies, and urban and regional planning. Areas of Emphasis View the course requirements and recommended semester by semester schedule of courses for the areas of emphasis in Urban and Regional Studies: Community Development Course work focuses on macro issues in economic development and planning, including Land Use Controls, Community Economic Development, Urban and Regional Planning, and Urban and Regional Economic Theory. Ethnic Studies Course work emphasizes experience of ethnic and racial groups in the United States, including especially the continuing efforts of these groups to build communities and their own ethnic identities in the United States. Urban and Regional Planning A specialized program of study emphasizing planning theory and methods and requiring internship work with local planning agencies. This curriculum is often selected by students interested in graduate work in urban and regional studies. Urban and Regional Studies Many students in are interested in the general program in urban and regional studies. Land Survey Certificate Program Offered in conjunction with Northeast Wisconsin Technical College. Students completing this degree program along with required courses at NWTC will receive state certificate in Land Surveying. [-]

Bachelor in Information Sciences

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The central organizing concept of this major is information — its structures in verbal, visual, mediated, and quantitative forms; its storage, analysis, evaluation, processing and communication by both machines and people. The program depends on current technologies and continues to evolve as technologies change. [+]

The central organizing concept of this major is information — its structures in verbal, visual, mediated, and quantitative forms; its storage, analysis, evaluation, processing and communication by both machines and people. The program depends on current technologies and continues to evolve as technologies change. Students can expect curricular additions and should consult with their advisor early and often to be aware of pending changes. The curriculum ranges widely across several disciplines, all of which are represented in the core requirements. They include computing, linguistics, cognitive psychology, communication theory, organizational communication and management, mathematics, data and information technologies, and language. Computing represents an important dimension of this major, but students also are expected to be thoroughly grounded in human language, human information processing, and communication. This helps ensure against narrow technical preparation, which too often leads to rapid obsolescence in rapidly changing fields, and it prepares students to make the most creative and useful applications of various information technologies. A goal of the program is to train students to conceptualize and solve information problems in interdisciplinary situations. A core introductory course focuses on information problems; most of the courses require projects, and many demand group work. A research project or internship is also required of all majors. Moreover, each student negotiates an individual area of emphasis. This requirement is an opportunity to apply information principles to a particular problem area or to gain further tools for a specific career direction. Students also develop a personal portfolio that documents many of their skills and areas of expertise. Finally, students complete an advanced information problems capstone course which integrates skills and knowledge acquired in the major. Career paths for Information Sciences graduates are changing rapidly and UW-Green Bay graduates report that the breadth of this program has been important to them. Some have essentially created their own positions. Some have pursued graduate work. Others have entered a wide variety of jobs after graduation in areas such as programming and software design, advertising, marketing and sales, systems analysis, and human resources. The required portfolio has proven to be an excellent means of attracting the attention and interest of prospective employers or for admission to graduate schools. Area of Emphasis Students must complete requirements in one of the following areas of emphasis: - Information Science Emphasis - Information Technology Emphasis [-]

Bachelor in Computer Science

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 USA Green Bay + 1 more

The Computer Science program is about problem solving and the ability to learn new ideas and apply them. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Green Bay USA. The Computer Science program is about problem solving and the ability to learn new ideas and apply them. That's because the heart of software design is not the language or the developer environment, but the ability to define a problem, analyze various components, and project and evaluate potential solutions, all of which are subject to limitations and constraints inherent in a given computer. Students must understand that in industry there must be more than just a working program. Good software must not only work but must be fully documented, clearly written, and easily modifiable to meet changing and more extensive requirements. Overview The field of computer science is undergoing great changes as technology advances and the need for computer software increases. Students entering this field must not see a bachelor's degree in computer science as the culmination of study in the field. Rather, they must see it as the first step in a continuing education process that will last as long as they choose to stay in the field. The goal of the Computer Science major is to provide students with a strong foundation upon which they can continue to build as the field changes. Students can receive instruction in areas such as software design and project management, object-oriented programming, design of algorithms, operating systems, database management systems, neural networks, computer graphics, network programming, and more. Computer science courses are often mistaken for programming courses. In reality, they require much more than learning and mastering a programming language. The heart of software design is not the language, but the ability to define a problem, analyze various components, and project and evaluate potential solutions, all of which must be scalable and robust. This must also be done under the constraint that they are subject to limitations and constraints inherent in a given computer. Students must understand that in industry there must be more than just a working program. Good software must not only work but must be fully documented, clearly written, easily modifiable to meet changing and more extensive requirements, and engineered for stability, security, and correctness. Equally important, the program provides a theoretical base for computer science and helps students understand there is more to computer science than software development. Students develop skills they can use upon graduation but they must be prepared to enter a field which is both diverse and rapidly changing and they must be able to adapt to new technologies. This requires a solid theoretical foundation with knowledge of how computers work and how they carry out tasks specified in applications software. It requires that students think beyond writing software and explore areas such as neural networks, computer graphics, algorithm analysis, or scientific applications. This knowledge is an important ingredient to professional development as it gives them the tools they need to analyze efficiency and evaluate various programming and data design options and to see the possible futures as computer science evolves. Simply providing them with skills necessary to enter the computing profession is not sufficient. Each student must be prepared to apply what he or she has learned in order to adapt to the inevitable changes that will occur. Each must also have the ability to learn new ideas and apply them. Graduates of the Computer Science program are prepared to continue their education at the graduate level or to apply for entry-level positions in industry. Typical entry-level jobs are programmer or programmer/analyst positions. Students majoring in Computer Science have two options. The first is the disciplinary track and is designed for those interested in pursuing careers in fields such as software development immediately after graduation. It has an emphasis on core computer science topics including fundamental theory and software engineering. Students choosing this track must also choose a minor from the list of interdisciplinary minors offered by the University. The most common choices are Information Sciences and Business Administration but there are other options. The second track is an interdisciplinary track combining Computer Science and Mathematics courses. It is designed to help students understand some of the more complex principles that form the foundation of topics such as algorithm analysis, number systems, coding, formal language, and encryption. Although it also serves students who are career bound after graduation, those students with interest in pursuing graduate studies in computer science are strongly encouraged to choose this track. Students taking this track are not required to choose an interdisciplinary minor. All registered students have access to the University's computing facilities. Student accounts allow students to access a wide variety of both PC-compatible and Macintosh computers, Linux and database servers (for select courses), various software developer environments, and of course the internet. Also, because of the department's participation in the Microsoft Academic Alliance, those enrolled in Computer Science courses are also entitled to home-use rights for a variety of Microsoft products. Labs are open seven days per week and are staffed by consultants who provide assistance in using the facilities. Classrooms also have network connections which allow demonstrations of software and internet applications to be integrated with classroom lectures. There is also a Computer Science teaching lab with 28 workstations and display facilities that support Computer Science instruction. Computer Science courses have a strict prerequisite structure. It is imperative that students learn what courses are prerequisites for others and when they are offered. Students are strongly encouraged to talk to an adviser very early in their college career. Students seeking information on teacher certification should contact the Education Office. Learning Outcomes Students must be able to design the logic and information structures necessary to create software capable of solving problems subject to specified constraints. Students must develop both written and verbal communication skills that support the design and documentation of software products and help utilities. Students must be able to analyze software to determine correctness and, if incorrect, be able to determine the cause of errors and fix them. Students must understand fundamental principles and theory of both computer hardware and software and the mathematical foundations on which Computer Science is built. [-]