Bachelor Program in Chambersburg USA

Top Bachelor Programs in Chambersburg USA 2017

Bachelor

Bachelor degrees from accredited colleges and universities can be important stepping-stones toward a successful career.The most common type of undergraduate program is a bachelor's degree, usually awarded after four years of successful study

A Bachelor is a popular college degree that is pursued by students who want to gain knowledge in a specific area of study. Completed in three to five years, it is available in a variety of study disciplines.

Education in the United States is mainly provided by the public sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: state, local, and federal, in that order. The common requirements to study at a higher education level in United States will include your admissions essay (also known as the statement of purpose or personal statement), transcript of records, recommendation/reference letters, language tests

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Bachelor Degree in History and Political Science

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

History and Political Science is an interdisciplinary, liberal arts major. The interdisciplinary emphasis deepens understanding of the nature and development of human institutions and behavior. In particular, students gain a historical perspective which is vital to a comprehensive understanding of contemporary social and political issues. Courses in the major also increase the student’s awareness of strategies available for dealing effectively with these issues. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Chambersburg USA. History and Political Science is an interdisciplinary, liberal arts major. The interdisciplinary emphasis deepens understanding of the nature and development of human institutions and behavior. In particular, students gain a historical perspective which is vital to a comprehensive understanding of contemporary social and political issues. Courses in the major also increase the student’s awareness of strategies available for dealing effectively with these issues. The program emphasizes development of skills useful in various occupations as well as in graduate school. Course work stresses development of verbal and written communication skills and analytical thinking. Small class sizes allow faculty members to frequently use innovative teaching methods, including simulations and collaborative learning. While breadth of knowledge in the major is emphasized, students also concentrate in an area of their choice. Concentrations are offered in these areas: History, International Relations, Political Science, and Thematic. A certificate for secondary teaching in Social Studies is also available. Concentrations History and Political Science Concentration in History Five courses in history, two of which must be at the 300 level, and two additional courses in political science. Students fulfilling a humanities focus in the history concentration may substitute two courses in classics, art history, music history, literature, philosophy, or religion studies for Sociology 120 and Economics 101 or 102 (see Course Requirements tab). Concentration in Political Science Five courses in political science, to include work in American government and international politics, with at least three of the five courses taken at the 300 level. Two additional courses in history. Thematic Concentration This option is available for students who wish to design their own program in area studies, such as European studies or American studies, or in a policy area of particular interest. The program is designed with a department adviser and includes seven additional courses, at least two of which are taken at the 300 level. Course Requirements History and Political Science ECO 101: Introduction to Macroeconomics or ECO 102: Introduction to Microeconomics* One of the following three HIS 110: Ancient and Mediterranean World HIS 111: Medieval and Early Modern Europe HIS 112: Modern European History One of the following three: HIS 124: American History to 1865 HIS 125: American History 1865-1945 HIS 126: American History Since 1945 HIS/PS 399: Senior Thesis PS 110 Introduction to Political Science PS 120: American Government SOC 120: Introduction to Sociology* Optional Courses: All majors are encouraged to take HIS/PS 355: Internship SOC 280: Qualitative Methods and Social Research In addition to the requirements above, one of the following concentrations will be completed: History, Political Science, or a Thematic Concentration. See the "Concentrations" tab to view the requirements for these concentrations. *Note: For the history concentration, the requirements in Economics (ECO 101 or ECO 102) and Sociology (SOC 120) may be replaced with two humanities courses for those who seek a humanities-oriented major. Student Learning Goals History and Political Science Goal #1: Acquisition and comprehension of content knowledge Students have a broad understanding of the significant developments in Western European and American History Students have knowledge of political institutions, processes, and theories and knowledge of fields in political science, including American government, political theory, and international studies Goal #2: Attainment of skills: written communication, oral communication, research, critical thinking and analysis Students are able to write with clarity and precision in various forms and in a manner which reflects acquired knowledge Students are able to speak effectively in a discussion group and present their work to audiences, using technological innovation where appropriate Students are able to effectively utilize a variety of sources – primary and secondary—and show mastery of research techniques Utilizing these skills, students will be able to formulate and defend a thesis, consider conflicting evidence and interpretations, critically examine sources, analyze change over time, and apply evidence Goal #3: Obtain an awareness of and appreciation for diversity Students gain a knowledge of and appreciation for issues related to race, class, gender and ethnicity in historical and political context Students will learn from others who are different than themselves, thereby engaging in a robust exchange of ideas that works to broaden their perspectives, promote thinking skills, enhance leadership and personal skills, and promote democratic values Career Opportunities History and Political Science History and Political Science is an excellent introduction to the study of law. Virtually all Wilson alumnae who have applied to law schools have been accepted. Career choices include: politics or government service, social service, publishing, librarianship, teaching, museum work, journalism, business, or criminal justice. Some careers require graduate study. Wilson has an excellent record in graduate school placements. Students are assisted in planning their academic programs to meet the needs of advanced degree programs. [-]

Bachelor Degree in Graphic Design

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. [+]

The graphic design program at Wilson balances artistic study and skill development with a traditional liberal arts education. This balance prepares graduates to be critical thinkers and creative problem-solvers while developing design skills and practices required for professional success. You will work in areas including image creation, graphic representation, identity, typography, web design, and two- and three-dimensional design and more. Students select from concentrations in graphic arts or graphic media. The graphic arts track emphasizes visual content development, composition and creation, and is suited to fine arts students who wish to pursue the practice of graphic design as a primary profession. The graphic media concentration—designed to provide students with training in visual communication—incorporates courses like writing and digital media with design classes, giving students a broader base of skills for work in communications and marketing-related professions. No matter which concentration is pursued, the graphic design major prepares students to be effective visual communications professionals. Working in both traditional and digital mediums, students learn to conceptualize, design and produce in a variety of design disciplines, including advertising, packaging, editorial or magazine design, websites and more. Senior capstone work focuses on the development of a student’s portfolio, an essential component in obtaining future employment. The portfolio represents a cohesive body of work that demonstrates the skill and proficiency of the designer. Graduates of the graphic design program are prepared for both immediate design practice and lifelong intellectual and creative growth. Concentration In Graphic Media Course Requirements Concentration in Graphic Media The Graphic Media concentration in Graphic Design focuses on a broader application of Graphic Design, combining courses in artistic content and creation with courses in traditional and social media writing and design. This generates the profile of a student who is very career-focused and, in many instances, may already be working in some capacity in the field. Students in this concentration will develop a foundational mixture of visual and written cultural abilities, and will be more well-rounded but less specialized than students majoring in either Graphic Arts or Communications. These students are mostly on the career track, and will be able to step into a wide variety of jobs that requires both artistic skills and writing content creation. FA 114 Drawing I FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III COM 130 Digital Communication and Design I COM 230 Digital Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic media majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography, and printmaking. Course Requirements Graphic Arts Concentration GRAPHIC ARTS CONCENTRATION Required courses: FA 114 Drawing I DNC 147 Movement as Culture FA 242 2D Design FA 120 Graphic Design l FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II One art history course WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic design majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography or printmaking. Concentration In Graphic Arts The concentration in graphic arts focuses on content development, with an emphasis on visual content development generation, provides an artistic rigor to the traditional graphic design major. Students in this concentration study aesthetics and visual theories of artistic development, and develop strong, creative problem-solving skills. The program’s emphasis on artistic content and creation is suited to students with an interest and background in fine arts. The program is structured to contribute to successful outcomes for graduates in a wide variety of professions, as well for those who desire graduate study in the graphic arts field. Career Opportunities for Graphic Design Career Opportunities Design Disciplines Editorial Design (Magazine/Newspaper) Packaging Branding/Logo Design Advertising Publication Design Signage and Wayfinding Experience Design Exhibition Design Communication Design Website Design Interactive Design Multimedia Creative Direction Potential Employers Design Firms Web/Multimedia Design Firms Advertising Agencies Publishing Houses Magazines Higher Education Government Agencies General Corporate Retail Corporate Television Newspapers In-House Creative Groups Museums/Galleries [-]

Bachelor Degree in Communications

Wilson College
Campus Full time September 2017 USA Chambersburg

Wilson College’s major in Communications balances critical thinking, media theory, and writing skills for use in both traditional media markets and today’s emerging digital media forms. Students will study the foundations of communications learning—i.e., journalistic writing, legal media issues, and media theory—and use that learning in traditional forms of media as well as online and digital media. In the process, students will create content for both print and digital publications and learn the fundamentals of marketing media and selling advertising. [+]

Bachelors 2017 in Chambersburg USA. Welcome to the Wilson College Department of Communications! In these web pages you can learn all about the Communications major and minor at Wilson College, about our current faculty, and about the various organizations and activities sponsored by the department. Wilson College’s major in Communications balances critical thinking, media theory, and writing skills for use in both traditional media markets and today’s emerging digital media forms. Students will study the foundations of communications learning—i.e., journalistic writing, legal media issues, and media theory—and use that learning in traditional forms of media as well as online and digital media. In the process, students will create content for both print and digital publications and learn the fundamentals of marketing media and selling advertising. Students who graduate from Wilson with a degree in Communications will have an array of marketable skills, including learning AP Style, designing print and online media frames, crafting public relations and advertising for a variety of industry purposes, and mastering a wide array of technical and software skills for use on traditional and electronic media. Students will gain additional skills in computer programming, graphic and website design, photography, and marketing, all of which positions the Wilson graduate for success in both the workforce and in graduate school. Internships take place in local media markets and include exposure to both traditional and online forms of media. By the completion of the degree program students will be ready to tackle the ever-evolving world of new and digital media and still understand the foundations of traditional media forms and styles. Wilson College has a successful track record in educating students in the Communications field. Recent graduates have been offered jobs writing for daily newspapers, editing nationally distributed magazines, writing for publications in the equestrian field, working in public relations at a large industrial firm, working for federal and state government agencies, teaching speech and journalism to high school students, working as a segment producer in a television station, working as on-air announcer in a radio station, and working in human resources for a major international company. Other graduates have gone directly on to graduate study at schools like Syracuse University, the Art Institute of Chicago, Shippensburg University, and numerous others. All Wilson graduates, regardless of major, are required to complete an assessment of the learning outcomes in their major. As a Communications major, you will complete your assessment within a structured classroom setting designed to optimize the experience to allow you to demonstrate your mastery of the field. Course Requirements Media Writing and Design COM 105 Introduction to Media Communication COM 130 Interactive Communication and Design I COM 201 Journalism COM 230 Interactive Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising COM 303 Media Law in a Digital Age COM 304 Media Theory COM 355 Internship COM 400 Assessment Portfolio (.5 credit) COM BB Billboard (for one course credit total) Plus four courses from among the following: BUS 223 Marketing Management CS 150 Programming and Design I CS 152 Programming and Design II ENG 212 Technical Writing FA 118 Introduction to Photography FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III (Web Design) A students may substitue a relevant topics class with permission of their academic adviser and the program director. Note: Students must complete courses in at least two of the four disciplines above. At least two of the four courses must be completed at the 200-level or higher. Course Requirements Graphic Media Concentration in Graphic Media The Graphic Media concentration in Graphic Design focuses on a broader application of Graphic Design, combining courses in artistic content and creation with courses in traditional and social media writing and design. This generates the profile of a student who is very career-focused and, in many instances, may already be working in some capacity in the field. Students in this concentration will develop a foundational mixture of visual and written cultural abilities, and will be more well-rounded but less specialized than students majoring in either Graphic Arts or Communications. These students are mostly on the career track, and will be able to step into a wide variety of jobs that requires both artistic skills and writing content creation. FA 114 Drawing I FA 120 Graphic Design I FA 221 Graphic Design II FA 330 Graphic Design III COM 130 Digital Communication and Design I COM 230 Digital Communication and Design II COM 233 Integrated Marketing and Advertising FA 355 Internship FA 420 Senior Seminar I FA 422 Senior Seminar II WS 320 Feminist Theory: Visual Culture In addition, all graphic media majors must complete a proficiency certificate in one of the following secondary arts areas: painting/drawing, photography, and printmaking. For more information about majors in Graphic Design, please see the homepage for the Graphic Design major. Associate Degree in Communications Associate of Arts in Communications The Associate of Arts degree in Communications is designed to allow the student to develop competencies as an oral, written, and visual communicator in a liberal arts context. Students who graduate from Wilson with an Associate of Arts degree in Communications will have an array of marketable skills, including mastering AP Style, designing print and online media frames, crafting public relations and advertising for a variety of industry purposes, and mastering a wide array of technical and software skills for use on traditional and electronic media. This degree will best serve the interests of the student who is contemplating a career in business, advertising, public relations, or the media. Minor in Communications COM105 Introduction to Communications Plus four additional courses, with at least one at the 300 level. Students often choose to minor in Communications to increase their writing skills in preparation for the job market. Related Minors English Theater Film Studies [-]