Bachelor Degree in Economics and Administration in Brown in USA

See Bachelor Programs in Economics and Administration 2017 in Brown in USA

Economics and Administration

A bachelor's degree is given to students who fulfill the necessary requirements given by the college or university they are attending. The requirements include three to seven years of focus on a subject, typically referred to as a major or concentration.

The USA remains the world’s most popular destination for international students. Universities in the US dominate the world rankings and the country also offers a wide variety of exciting study locations. State university systems are partially subsidized by state governments, and may have many campuses spread around the state, with hundreds of thousands of students.

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Bachelor in Accounting

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

In the Accounting program you gain both the in-depth accounting knowledge and the broad background in business needed to understand the role of accounting in the business world. [+]

Bachelors in Economics and Administration in Brown in USA. Disciplinary Both the major and minor in Accounting are disciplinary. "Disciplinary" means that all accounting students receive vigorous and thorough training in accounting. More than 90 percent of UW-Green Bay Accounting graduates typically find employment in their chosen career within six months of graduation. Alumni surveys indicate that alumni perceive the Accounting program very favorably, their program of study prepared them extremely well for their careers, the quality of the Accounting faculty is "excellent" and they would definitely recommend the program to others. Recent surveys also suggest that well over 30 percent of the Accounting graduates pass all four parts of the C.P.A. exam during their first sitting; of those who take it a second time, 75 percent pass all four parts. These figures compare very favorably with the national averages, where the first time pass rate is approximately 20 percent. These successes may be attributed to Accounting’s contemporary and rigorous curriculum, a dedication to teaching excellence and to an emphasis on the skills basic to career advancement such as effective writing, speaking, quantitative analysis, computer proficiency, decision making and problem solving. In the Accounting program you gain both the in-depth accounting knowledge and the broad background in business needed to understand the role of accounting in the business world. Accounting faculty are committed to serving the needs of business and society and to providing an outstanding learning environment. The Accounting program addresses contemporary accounting and business issues, including the role of accounting in continuous quality improvement, the implementation of computer technology, advances in accounting information systems and ac¬counting ethics. These issues and more are addressed in specific classes and throughout the curriculum. Today's business¬es require employees who are effective communicators and prob¬lem solvers with broad-based liberal educations. Accounting students take courses that develop their communi¬cation skills and they gain breadth through courses in the arts, humani¬ties, social sciences and natural sciences. Extensive opportunities are available to meet business professionals and to gain practical experience. Active student organizations, such as the Accounting Students Association, provide opportunities to meet others with like interests and to develop contacts with businesses. Participation in the internship program is strongly encouraged. Here students learn while working in an actual business setting. Many students continue working full-time for their internship sponsors upon graduation. Since the major in Accounting is a disciplinary major, the student must complete an interdisciplinary minor. Students who complete the Accounting major automatically fulfill the requirements for the minor in Business Administration. [-]

Bachelor in Economics

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The systematic study of economics helps one to better understand this complex system of markets, enterprises (profit-motivated, government, and private, not-for-profit), unions, and many other economic and political interest groups that influence the economy and the role of government. [+]

Economics is everywhere! As workers, consumers, and sometimes business owners all of us have through our daily activities gained some knowledge of how the economy functions. This knowledge, however, is not systematic and precise. The modern economy is an extremely complex system of social institutions. The systematic study of economics helps one to better understand this complex system of markets, enterprises (profit-motivated, government, and private, not-for-profit), unions, and many other economic and political interest groups that influence the economy and the role of government. Here are a few basic practical questions the study of economics helps one to understand. Why are wages and salaries so different? Some workers work for $5 per hour while others thousands of dollars per hour. Why does the price of housing different so much across cities? One can buy a very nice house in Green Bay for $200,000. That very same house would cost five or ten times more in many parts of the east and west coasts. Why do airfares differ so much for the same flight? For example, on a flight from, say, Chicago to Los Angeles in economy class, some people are paying a $200 fare while others are paying $800. Questions on a broader level include the following: - Why are countries such as the United States so rich while others are so poor? Workers in the poorest countries of the world earn only about 10 cents per hour. - What can be done to improve their standard of living? And even in rich countries such as the United States, 12 to 15 percent of the population lives in poverty. - What can be done to improve the lives of the poor? - Why is it that some countries at times have had inflation rates of 10,000 percent or even more than one million percent per year whereas others tend have inflation rates of one or two percent. - Why is it that the unemployment rate fluctuates from year to year and sometime economic recessions and depressions arise? - And can the government successful fight high unemployment? If so, how? - Economics used to be called “political economy” and for good reason. Most political issues are linked, directly or indirectly, to economics. Resources are scare and political choices must be made. Should more or less money be spent on the military? Or should more resources be devoted to health care, education, a cleaner and more sustainable environment, and so on? Should the legal minimum wage be raised? Should taxes be raised or lowered? But there are many taxes. For example, there is the personal income tax, the payroll tax, the corporate income tax, various sales and excise taxes, tariffs, and inheritance taxes, to name a few. Any tax changes will have different impacts on the efficiency of the economy as well as the distribution of income and wealth. In short, there are an endless number of questions that voters and politician must decide on. Consequently, studying economics helps a person become a more informed voter. Finally, studying economics will help a person make better economic decisions throughout their life. Two key questions of personal finance are very relevant to everyone. Throughout your life you will faced with choices with respect to various kinds of insurance products. But there are many kinds of insurance: auto insurance, health insurance, homeowners insurance, life insurance, etc. The costs and benefits of these insurance products require significant economic knowledge. Moreover, studying economics will greatly help you make better saving and investment decisions. Again, these are rather difficult decisions but good saving and investment decisions can greatly increase your wealth. For example, the yearly income of the average American household is about $52,000. If a household can save some $8,000 per year and invest this amount in broadly diversified investments in 30 to 40 years their wealth is likely to range from $500,000 to $1.5 million. One must note, however, that economics as a discipline is far broader than the economy itself. At the most fundamental level, economics is the study of human choices and behavior grounded on the crucial assumption that humans choose with a purpose and consequently respond to incentives, economic and noneconomic. Consequently, in recent decades economics has become increasingly interdisciplinary. Economists have increasingly made important contributions in many other social and behavioral sciences including history, sociology, political science, and geography. Likewise, the methods and insights of other disciplines have been increasingly introduced into economics. Psychology is most prominent in this respect. Indeed, just a few years ago a leading psychologist was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics. Moreover, an examination of the Nobel Prize contributions over the last several decades shows that approximately 40% of the winners have received their award for research clearly outside the conventional boundaries of economics. [-]

Bachelor in Environmental Policy &Planning

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The <strong>major in Environmental Policy and Planning, offered by the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs</strong>, is an environmental studies program based in the social sciences. [+]

Bachelors in Economics and Administration in Brown in USA. The major in Environmental Policy and Planning, offered by the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs, is an environmental studies program based in the social sciences. It is designed to prepare students for a variety of challenging professions involving the planning, analysis, design, and administration of policies and programs dealing with the natural and human-made environment. This interdisciplinary major is also suitable preparation for further study in a wide range of graduate programs, including environmental studies, public policy, public administration, law, urban and regional planning, and related fields. Through this major, students develop knowledge and skills in planning and decision making, public policy, political and economic systems, and the environmental sciences, and acquire the analytic capacities for participation in those processes which will shape environmental quality in the future. Internships, special topics courses, and/or applied research projects are available for every student. Internships are especially encouraged. These are generally short-term positions with local governments or agencies (usually non-paid) where students carry out projects related to their academic interests and skills. In addition to obtaining valuable experience, students enhance their opportunities for future employment and graduate school. Graduates work in public, private and nonprofit organizations. For example, students have found employment with environmental groups, in local government and in environmental compliance departments of large companies. Information about careers can be found on the Internet, or in career guides. Other material about careers can be reviewed in the University's Career Services in Student Services 1600. That office also can assist you in exploring career opportunities and in preparing a resume. If you are interested in pursuing an Environmental Policy and Planning major or minor, contact the program adviser or the chair of Public and Environmental Affairs to discuss programs of study that are available. They can advise you on the best order in which to take courses, the most suitable way to prepare for specific courses, and help you succeed in the program. You should also consider talking with students in the program, or accessing the newsletter on the department’s website. You might also want to examine the PEA department home page for information about internships, course syllabi, faculty, and other pertinent topics. Learning Outcomes The faculty members in Public and Environmental Affairs have given much thought to what we expect our majors in Environmental Policy and Planning to learn to serve them well in their future careers. We are including a copy of those “learning outcomes” here so that you know in general what our expectations are. Each of the learning outcomes below indicates which courses in the curriculum are particularly appropriate for that objective. As part of our annual effort to assess how well our majors are doing in meeting these expectations, we will evaluate at least one written assignment in each of our core courses using these criteria. We will also send a questionnaire to graduating senior majors to ask them how well they believe the program helped them to meet the same objectives. - Exhibit an understanding and ability to implement sustainability as an engaged citizen (PU EN AF 102, 323, 324) - Demonstrate basic knowledge of environmental science and selected other areas of natural science (ENV SCI-102 and both lower- and upper-level environmental science, biology, geography, and geology courses). - Express knowledge of the concepts, principles, and theories of environmental policy, law, and planning (PU EN AF-202, 408, 301, 322, 350, and 378). - Engage in ethical decision making and critical thinking in environmental policy and planning (PU EN AF 430). - Communicate clearly and effectively about environmental policy and planning (all courses). - Use technical skills in environmental policy and planning (PU EN AF-301, 378, 322, and other upper-level courses). - Qualify for graduate work in schools of environmental studies, public policy, public affairs, planning, or related fields, or to qualify for entry level professional employment in environmental policy and planning (all courses). [-]