Part time Bachelor Degree in Biology in Wisconsin in USA

Find Part time Bachelor Programs in Biology in Wisconsin USA 2017

Biology

A Bachelor's degree is a degree awarded by universities and colleges. In order to earn a bachelor's degree, you must complete the necessary courses that may last three to seven years depending on your institution of enrollment.

Graduates of a Bachelor’s degree in Biology will be knowledgeable in diverse areas related to biological sciences. These areas range from genetics and evolution, to ecology or cellular biology. The degree is then involved with the theory and practice of animal and plant biology, by observation and analysis of biological systems.

The USA remains the world’s most popular destination for international students. Universities in the US dominate the world rankings and the country also offers a wide variety of exciting study locations. State university systems are partially subsidized by state governments, and may have many campuses spread around the state, with hundreds of thousands of students.

Wisconsin is a state known for its production of dairy products. But amidst the farm fields Wisconsin is home to some of the most prestigious private and public universities in the country. These colleges are known for having a thriving nightlife, as well as rigorous course work in many different majors.

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Bachelor in Biology

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Part time September 2017 USA Green Bay

The Biology program provides insights into living systems from the sub-cellular level to the ecosystem level. The <strong>Biology major</strong> prepares students for careers in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, plant and animal biology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and field biology. [+]

Part time Bachelors in Biology in Wisconsin in USA. The Biology program provides insights into living systems from the sub-cellular level to the ecosystem level. The Biology major prepares students for careers in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry, plant and animal biology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and field biology. A curriculum can be developed to prepare for medical, dental, veterinary, agriculture, or other professional schools, or for graduate study. The major also establishes a foundation for interdisciplinary careers in biological resources management, human biology, nutritional sciences, and science communications (technical writing, journalism, and nature interpretation). Biology graduates are employed in industry (pharmaceuticals, paper making, food processing, hospitals and clinics, agriculture, and others); government agencies (Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Department of Agriculture, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources); environmental consulting firms; and educational institutions. About 40 percent of Biology graduates pursue advanced degrees in graduate and professional schools. Biology majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Human Biology is the minor commonly chosen by Biology majors with interests in health sciences or exercise science. Students interested in ecology, biodiversity, and management of biological resources such as wildlife, forests, and fisheries, typically take a minor in Environmental Science. Other interdisciplinary areas that may be useful, depending upon a student's career goals, include Business Administration and Environmental Policy and Planning. Students who prefer a Biology minor (rather than a major), coupled with an interdisciplinary major, might consider majors in Environmental Science or Human Biology. Students in Education who desire to become science teachers have found the Biology major important. A particular advantage of the UW-Green Bay Biology program is the opportunity for undergraduate students to gain practical experience. Many students work with faculty on research projects. There is an active internship program with private, state and national agencies, and with industry. Such experiences are beneficial when entering the job market or seeking admission to graduate and professional schools. The program has well-equipped laboratories for teaching and student/faculty research. In cellular and molecular biology laboratories, students become familiar with techniques of tissue culture, in situ hybridization, affinity chromatography, agarose and polyacrylamide gel, electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and the use of monoclonal antibodies. In physiology laboratories, students learn techniques to study physiological functions. Teaching and research facilities available to field and ecology students include the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, the 290-acre Cofrin Memorial Arboretum on the campus, off-campus natural areas managed by the University, the Richter Natural History Museum, small animal laboratory, herbarium, greenhouse, and computer labs. Students get to practice their knowledge in both field and laboratory settings, and master basic skills including statistical analysis, various laboratory methods and techniques, and taxonomic (identification) skills. Many occupations today require a college-educated individual who can write and speak well, solve problems, learn new information quickly and work well with others on a team. Students in the Biology program develop these skills with excellence. Who should be a Biology major? Anyone who is interested in discovering how organisms function and exploring how life exists in the world should consider the Biology program. Those who have a general interest in working with the principles of math, chemistry, physics, and of course Biology should consider majoring (or having a minor) in Biology. Biology majors must combine their studies with an interdisciplinary minor. Students interested in areas such as resource management, field ecology, or science communication normally take a minor in Environmental Science. Human Biology is the minor commonly chosen by Biology majors with interests in health sciences or adult fitness. Other interdisciplinary areas that may be useful, depending upon a student's career goals, include Environmental Policy and Planning or Business Administration. [-]

Bachelor in Human Biology

University Of Wisconsin - Green Bay
Campus Part time 4 years September 2017 USA Green Bay

Laboratory courses are critical part of a Human Biology major. There is a difference between studying science and doing science. Lecture courses guide in the study of science. Laboratory courses build on knowledge to produce know-how and prepare students to do science. Research projects have students do science. Lecture, lab, and research are important components of a Human Biology major. [+]

Laboratory courses are critical part of a Human Biology major. There is a difference between studying science and doing science. Lecture courses guide in the study of science. Laboratory courses build on knowledge to produce know-how and prepare students to do science. Research projects have students do science. Lecture, lab, and research are important components of a Human Biology major. Overview The Human Biology Program offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate major and minor. Our goal is provide students with a curriculum that facilitates an understanding of the human organism from biological, medical, behavioral and nutritional perspectives. Our program draws on the expertise of faculty from a variety of academic disciplines, including biology (molecular and cellular biology), genetics, evolution, reproduction, immunology, pharmacology, physiology, exercise physiology, neurobiology, nutrition, food science, biochemistry chemistry, and physics. At the time that students declare their Human Biology major, they choose an emphasis within the major (in consultation with their faculty advisor) that best facilitates their professional goals. We offer the following emphases within the Human Biology major: Health Science Exercise Science Nutritional Sciences/Dietetics Cytotechnology General Human Biology Human Biology Learning Goals The Human Biology Program has the following learning goals: Demonstrate knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of human organs and organ systems Demonstrate a basic knowledge of molecular / biochemical processes Demonstrate a basic knowledge of cell structure, organelles and cellular processes Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of evolutionary forces on the human organism Demonstrate an understanding of the ecological context of humans Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of nutrients on human physiology Demonstrate an understanding of the interactions of exercise and human physiology Demonstrate an understanding of scientific processes, including inductive and deductive reasoning, formulation of hypotheses and experimental design Demonstrate an understanding of research methodologies and the relative value of information obtained from experiments involving observation, correlation and examination of cause/effect relationships Know and execute state-of-the-art laboratory techniques Analyze and interpret scientific information Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical and social dimensions of science, as well as weaknesses / limitations and assumptions of science as practiced in the US Demonstrate the awareness, understanding and skills necessary to work in a diverse world [-]