Table 'masterstudies.ms_Sitemap' doesn't exist#0 db::q(SELECT num,num_providers FROM ms_Sitemap WHERE idSector='3918' and idArea='0' and idCountry='125' and idRegion='1772' and idType='3' and idSite='0' and mode='all' ) called at [/home/keystone/www_files/deploy_1481096443084/public_html/common.inc.php:3559] #1 has_products2(Array ([idSector] => 3918,[mode] => all,[idType] => 3,[idCountry] => 125,[idRegion] => 1772), Array ([return_array] => 1)) called at [/home/keystone/www_files/deploy_1481096443084/public_html/system_main_function_search.inc.php:326] #2 get_products(Array ([unique_search] => /Bachelor/Arts/Macau/Macau/,[source] => search_result,[use_aggregate_tables] => 1,[intensity] => ,[use_auto_mapping] => ,[idRegion] => 1772,[idSector] => 3918)) called at [/home/keystone/www_files/deploy_1481096443084/public_html/controllers/listingController.php:195] #3 ListingController->index() #4 call_user_func_array(Array ([0] => ListingController Object ([blade] => duncan3dc\Laravel\BladeInstance Object ([] => /home/keystone/www_files/deploy_1481096443084/public_html/views/,[] => /home/keystone/www_files/deploy_1481096443084/public_html/cache/views/,[] => ,[] => ),[data] => Array ([idType] => 3,[idSector] => 3918,[mode] => ,[idCountry] => 125,[idRegion] => 1772,[idArea] => ,[amp] => ,[title] => Masterstudies.com,[environment] => Array ([dev] => Development,[staging] => Staging,[prod] => Production),[arrHreflangs] => Array (),[ga] => Array ([0] => Array ([report] => 29734347-33,[account_prefix] => ),[1] => Array ([report] => 29734347-1,[account_prefix] => t2.)),[logo] => Array ([src] => //cdn01.masterstudies.com/img/logo/Bachelorstudies-ms-en.png,[alt] => Best Bachelor's Degrees & Programs 2017 - Over {number:programs} Bachelors Programs globally),[second_nav_items] => Array ([0] => Array ([title] => Bachelor's Degrees,[active] => 1,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Bachelor/),[1] => Array ([title] => Bachelor of Science,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BSc/),[2] => Array ([title] => Bachelor of Arts,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BA/),[3] => Array ([title] => Business Administration,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BBA/),[4] => Array ([title] => Online Bachelor Degrees,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Online-Degrees/),[5] => Array ([title] => Universities by Country,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/universities/)),[footer_links] => Array ([0] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/About-Us.html,[title] => About us),[1] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Contact-us.html,[title] => Contact us),[2] => Array ([url] => http://keystoneacademic.com/,[title] => Keystone Academic Solutions),[3] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Terms-and-Conditions.html,[title] => Terms and Conditions),[4] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Privacy-policy.html,[title] => Privacy),[5] => Array ([url] => /sitemap/,[title] => Sitemap)),[listingNews_aside] => Array ([0] => News Object ([] => International Numbers Top 1 Million in the US,[] => en,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => 1,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => 1,[] => Array (),[] => 1262,[] => Array ([idNews] => 1262,[idUser] => 45,[idUserLog] => 2325,[idType] => 50,[idProvider] => 0,[active] => Yes,[show_title] => Yes,[show_lead] => No,[show_link] => No,[created_at] => 2016-12-05 15:21:32,[updated_at] => 2016-12-05 15:21:32,[start_at] => 2016-12-05 00:00:00,[end_at] => 2037-12-31 00:00:00,[random] => 75a87fa4,[internal_notes] => ,[news_type] => news,[idThumbnail] => 35348,[idNewsPhoto] => 0,[conference_start_at] => ,[idregion] => 0,[idLanguage] => en,[url_path] => International-Numbers-Top-1-Million-in-the-US,[head_title] => ,[title] => International Numbers Top 1 Million in the US,[lead] =>

Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[text] =>

The results are in from the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Open Doors report, and the news is positive.  The number of international students in the US in 2015-2016 topped one million students for the first time—and that’s only 5 percent of the number of students pursuing higher education in the country.  First-time enrollments of international students increased by 2.4 percent since 2015, but those who enrolled in intensive English programs fell by 14.6 percent.

Students from China made up the largest percentage of international students in the US at 31. 5 percent, closely followed by India, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea

More than one-third of these students are studying engineering, math, or computer science, and about 14 percent are involved in STEM-related coursework.  Why?  The IIE suggests the growth of STEM students is probably related to the 25 percent increase in students from India—more than 75 percent of students from India who study in the US study STEM.

While many international students choose to study in the US, many US students are just beginning to realize the benefits of studying abroad.  IIE’s President, Allan Goodman reports, “Studying abroad is one of the best ways to prepare to enter and succeed in the interconnected, globalized workforce, yet 90 percent of American college students do not study or intern outside of the United States. We owe it to the next generation of Americans to find ways to make it more accessible to a wider range of students.”  He added, “Some U.S. students studying in STEM fields had found it challenging to study abroad. But this is changing, and global experience is increasingly crucial to success in all fields.

Concerns?  The Open Doors report reflects 10 years straight of growth in the number of international students on US campuses.  While this is good news, there’s concern in the US and the international community about the potentially deleterious effects of a Trump presidency.    

Learn more about studying in the US.    

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Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[db_lead] =>

Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[text] =>

The results are in from the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Open Doors report, and the news is positive.  The number of international students in the US in 2015-2016 topped one million students for the first time—and that’s only 5 percent of the number of students pursuing higher education in the country.  First-time enrollments of international students increased by 2.4 percent since 2015, but those who enrolled in intensive English programs fell by 14.6 percent.

Students from China made up the largest percentage of international students in the US at 31. 5 percent, closely followed by India, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea

More than one-third of these students are studying engineering, math, or computer science, and about 14 percent are involved in STEM-related coursework.  Why?  The IIE suggests the growth of STEM students is probably related to the 25 percent increase in students from India—more than 75 percent of students from India who study in the US study STEM.

While many international students choose to study in the US, many US students are just beginning to realize the benefits of studying abroad.  IIE’s President, Allan Goodman reports, “Studying abroad is one of the best ways to prepare to enter and succeed in the interconnected, globalized workforce, yet 90 percent of American college students do not study or intern outside of the United States. We owe it to the next generation of Americans to find ways to make it more accessible to a wider range of students.”  He added, “Some U.S. students studying in STEM fields had found it challenging to study abroad. But this is changing, and global experience is increasingly crucial to success in all fields.

Concerns?  The Open Doors report reflects 10 years straight of growth in the number of international students on US campuses.  While this is good news, there’s concern in the US and the international community about the potentially deleterious effects of a Trump presidency.    

Learn more about studying in the US.    

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A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[text] =>

Education Malta, a non-profit, public-private partnership between the government and the Chamber of Commerce, recently launched a new campaign to attract educational institutions to the island nation of just over 400,000 residents.  This is in direct response to the Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 call for an entity to promote educational investments.                

Education Minister Evarist Bartolo reported in Malta Today that international education institutions wanted to establish a presence on the island to attract international students.  “Malta should endeavor to attract quality institutions,” he said.  “Education Malta should complement the Government Ministry for Education and Employment as the legislator, while the National Commission for Further and Higher Education will continue to rigorously see that the set high standards and levels in education are retained.  We will not compromise quality for quantity.”

Education Malta’s chairman, Charles Zammit, focused on the public-private aspect of the initiative.  He reportedly said, “We are going out to the market as both the private sector and the public sector.  So I think that should be more effective.”

Malta already has an international presence with branch campuses from the UK’s University of Middlesex, Barts, and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.  Zammit also added, “We have a very good brand in English language teaching which we have been building up for the past 25 years, and I think that brand can help us to promote Malta to a wider [segment] of the education sector.”

Where will the new campaign focus its efforts?  Primarily Europe and the Middle East. 

Learn more about studying in Malta.

 

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A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[db_lead] =>

A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[text] =>

Education Malta, a non-profit, public-private partnership between the government and the Chamber of Commerce, recently launched a new campaign to attract educational institutions to the island nation of just over 400,000 residents.  This is in direct response to the Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 call for an entity to promote educational investments.                

Education Minister Evarist Bartolo reported in Malta Today that international education institutions wanted to establish a presence on the island to attract international students.  “Malta should endeavor to attract quality institutions,” he said.  “Education Malta should complement the Government Ministry for Education and Employment as the legislator, while the National Commission for Further and Higher Education will continue to rigorously see that the set high standards and levels in education are retained.  We will not compromise quality for quantity.”

Education Malta’s chairman, Charles Zammit, focused on the public-private aspect of the initiative.  He reportedly said, “We are going out to the market as both the private sector and the public sector.  So I think that should be more effective.”

Malta already has an international presence with branch campuses from the UK’s University of Middlesex, Barts, and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.  Zammit also added, “We have a very good brand in English language teaching which we have been building up for the past 25 years, and I think that brand can help us to promote Malta to a wider [segment] of the education sector.”

Where will the new campaign focus its efforts?  Primarily Europe and the Middle East. 

Learn more about studying in Malta.

 

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In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[text] =>

With three out of ten of the world’s top universities in the UK, it’s no surprise that the UK draws significant numbers of international students.  What are the benefits of studying in the UK?  A new campaign that promotes the UK as a study destination and an option for transnational education aims to show students exactly what those benefits are.  The £6 million Study UK Discover You campaign, half funded by the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign, and matched by The British Council, aims to “inspire” international students to recognize that an education in the UK will lead to knowledge, confidence, and necessary skills for success in the 21st century.                      

The website for the campaign has information relevant to higher education and transnational opportunities for international students, in addition practical advice regarding British culture, English language education, visas, scholarships, financing, accommodations, holidays, festivals, events, and student testimonials from international students who have studied in the UK. 

Why now?  The Higher Education Statistics Agency recently reported that 665,000 students studied offshore for a degree in the UK during 2014-2015.  And that number is rising.  Jacqueline Jenkins, senior advisor of education management at the British Council, reported, “[It’s] not just to encourage more international students to study in the UK.”  She said, “It’s also to encourage more international students to take up UK courses and qualifications overseas.”

Their target audiences?  China, India, and Malaysia to start.  Jenkins said that the campaign will start by using social media to make its presence known, and then expand its strategies—and its marketing focus—after the launch. 

Learn more about studying in the UK.

 

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In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[db_lead] =>

In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[text] =>

With three out of ten of the world’s top universities in the UK, it’s no surprise that the UK draws significant numbers of international students.  What are the benefits of studying in the UK?  A new campaign that promotes the UK as a study destination and an option for transnational education aims to show students exactly what those benefits are.  The £6 million Study UK Discover You campaign, half funded by the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign, and matched by The British Council, aims to “inspire” international students to recognize that an education in the UK will lead to knowledge, confidence, and necessary skills for success in the 21st century.                      

The website for the campaign has information relevant to higher education and transnational opportunities for international students, in addition practical advice regarding British culture, English language education, visas, scholarships, financing, accommodations, holidays, festivals, events, and student testimonials from international students who have studied in the UK. 

Why now?  The Higher Education Statistics Agency recently reported that 665,000 students studied offshore for a degree in the UK during 2014-2015.  And that number is rising.  Jacqueline Jenkins, senior advisor of education management at the British Council, reported, “[It’s] not just to encourage more international students to study in the UK.”  She said, “It’s also to encourage more international students to take up UK courses and qualifications overseas.”

Their target audiences?  China, India, and Malaysia to start.  Jenkins said that the campaign will start by using social media to make its presence known, and then expand its strategies—and its marketing focus—after the launch. 

Learn more about studying in the UK.

 

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In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[text] =>

Everyone knows: research is important.  As an undergraduate, working on research can help you with graduate plans and future career moves.  If you want to do research as an undergraduate, you don’t necessarily need to study at a research university though.  In fact, it might be more difficult to do research at a research university as an undergraduate.  Why?  Research universities often focus on graduate students for research, not undergrads.  If you want to do research, and you’re an undergrad, consider these ideas. 

 

Get involved: Volunteer

It’s not enough to have great grades.  You need to get involved wherever you are.  How do you do this?  You volunteer.  Figure out which department interests you the most by taking classes, talking to your classmates, or visiting with a few professors.  Offer to volunteer with a faculty member on a research project. 

Can you just offer to volunteer?  Yes.  And no.  Think about the professors with whom you might want to work.  If you don’t know where to start, talk to your classmates—with whom are they taking classes?  Which professors do they like?  Which ones do you like?  Does the professor have an established reputation in the field of your interest? 

Contact them.  Visit during office hours—or even better, make an appointment and explain the purpose of the appointment.  Bring your CV or resume—and dress nicely.  No scrubby jeans or pajama bottoms.  You don’t need to go overboard, but mind your appearance.  Express interest in the research—or ask questions about what the research the professor is currently doing.  Ask—are they looking for volunteers?  Explain why you’re interested.  Most important?  Establish positive rapport.  If your request doesn’t go so well, chalk it up to experience.  If it goes well, congratulations!  You have an undergraduate research position!  If it goes well, but you don’t have a research position?  Don’t worry.  You’ve made a positive impression on faculty at your school—and you’ve built confidence in moving forward. 

 

Check out undergrad research programs

What can you do if there are no opportunities on your campus, or you’ve tried and it’s not working out?  Consider volunteering or interning outside your university.  Hospitals and medical centers often seek undergraduate research volunteers, in addition to private industries, or community-based organizations.  In bigger cities, undergraduates have more options—your university might even have a volunteer office.  The best strategy?  Talk to professors whose work interests you—and have them help you find opportunities either on-campus or off. 

What do you need to do?  Find the people who can help you, express interest, be polite, and go from there.  If you have no idea where to start, don’t know which professors to ask, start with your campus career office.  Private businesses and companies will often post research opportunities with your career office—or pertinent department.

The key is to be open to opportunities—and to be willing to talk to people who can and want to help you. 

 

Try a small college

Sometimes, smaller is better.  They’re not “R1” universities with world-class research facilities—but they are small schools with faculty focused on teaching.  An outstanding teacher will recognize the need for research opportunities.  You may just get more attention from faculty who want to see you succeed at a smaller, more student-focused school than you will at a bigger “R1” school.  Sure, there may be less funding at smaller schools, but you may just find the perfect opportunity to focus on research that interests you—with incredible faculty support.  Think about this option as a “quality v. quantity” problem. 

There’s potentially more of a need for help with research at smaller schools too—which translates to more opportunity for you.  For most faculty at smaller colleges, teaching comes first, research comes second.  Teaching professors are often looking for help—and a curious undergraduate seeking research experience is often one of the best options.  It’s win-win for professors and for you. 

Your takeaway?  Do your homework.  Talk to people.  Be curious and unfailingly polite. Always work hard and do your best. 

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In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[db_lead] =>

In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[text] =>

Everyone knows: research is important.  As an undergraduate, working on research can help you with graduate plans and future career moves.  If you want to do research as an undergraduate, you don’t necessarily need to study at a research university though.  In fact, it might be more difficult to do research at a research university as an undergraduate.  Why?  Research universities often focus on graduate students for research, not undergrads.  If you want to do research, and you’re an undergrad, consider these ideas. 

 

Get involved: Volunteer

It’s not enough to have great grades.  You need to get involved wherever you are.  How do you do this?  You volunteer.  Figure out which department interests you the most by taking classes, talking to your classmates, or visiting with a few professors.  Offer to volunteer with a faculty member on a research project. 

Can you just offer to volunteer?  Yes.  And no.  Think about the professors with whom you might want to work.  If you don’t know where to start, talk to your classmates—with whom are they taking classes?  Which professors do they like?  Which ones do you like?  Does the professor have an established reputation in the field of your interest? 

Contact them.  Visit during office hours—or even better, make an appointment and explain the purpose of the appointment.  Bring your CV or resume—and dress nicely.  No scrubby jeans or pajama bottoms.  You don’t need to go overboard, but mind your appearance.  Express interest in the research—or ask questions about what the research the professor is currently doing.  Ask—are they looking for volunteers?  Explain why you’re interested.  Most important?  Establish positive rapport.  If your request doesn’t go so well, chalk it up to experience.  If it goes well, congratulations!  You have an undergraduate research position!  If it goes well, but you don’t have a research position?  Don’t worry.  You’ve made a positive impression on faculty at your school—and you’ve built confidence in moving forward. 

 

Check out undergrad research programs

What can you do if there are no opportunities on your campus, or you’ve tried and it’s not working out?  Consider volunteering or interning outside your university.  Hospitals and medical centers often seek undergraduate research volunteers, in addition to private industries, or community-based organizations.  In bigger cities, undergraduates have more options—your university might even have a volunteer office.  The best strategy?  Talk to professors whose work interests you—and have them help you find opportunities either on-campus or off. 

What do you need to do?  Find the people who can help you, express interest, be polite, and go from there.  If you have no idea where to start, don’t know which professors to ask, start with your campus career office.  Private businesses and companies will often post research opportunities with your career office—or pertinent department.

The key is to be open to opportunities—and to be willing to talk to people who can and want to help you. 

 

Try a small college

Sometimes, smaller is better.  They’re not “R1” universities with world-class research facilities—but they are small schools with faculty focused on teaching.  An outstanding teacher will recognize the need for research opportunities.  You may just get more attention from faculty who want to see you succeed at a smaller, more student-focused school than you will at a bigger “R1” school.  Sure, there may be less funding at smaller schools, but you may just find the perfect opportunity to focus on research that interests you—with incredible faculty support.  Think about this option as a “quality v. quantity” problem. 

There’s potentially more of a need for help with research at smaller schools too—which translates to more opportunity for you.  For most faculty at smaller colleges, teaching comes first, research comes second.  Teaching professors are often looking for help—and a curious undergraduate seeking research experience is often one of the best options.  It’s win-win for professors and for you. 

Your takeaway?  Do your homework.  Talk to people.  Be curious and unfailingly polite. Always work hard and do your best. 

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Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[text] =>

Engage your brain.  Pushing the boundaries of your comfort zone pushes you to become a better person.  Meet people you wouldn’t otherwise meet.  Question and challenge yourself. Cultivate a new skill.  Sign up and show up.  Take a break from what you “do” and try something new. Be who you are, not what you do.  Here are six possibilities for hobbies that we think will turn on your brain—and maybe even your career.

 

1. Music & Dance

Not only can listening to music and dancing reduce your stress levels, but they increase your levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in your brain that is linked to feelings of well-being.  Love pop?  Try classical.  Have you always admired hip-hop?  Join an on-campus group.   Tap dancing?  Tappity-tap away.  Want to play the kazoo?  Do it.  You’ll meet people who have the talent and skill that you admire—and you’ll also meet people who are open-minded and willing to try new things.  Just like you.

 

2. Photography

Slow down and de-stress by capturing a moment in time.  Just one.  Focus on it.  Capture dew drops on a blade of grass.  An icicle that formed overnight.  A child’s smile.  A honeybee on a sunflower. Photography reduces your stress level and encourages you to focus, visually, on something other than you do all the time.  Who knows?  It could even lead to a career decision.  Consider Dr. Pauley Chea.  When he was a med student at the University of Connecticut, he thought he wanted to study emergency medicine. He also loved photography.  Guess what he does now?  He’s a radiologist.  Translate your passion into your career.    

 

3. Coding

Like learning new languages?  Reading music?  Love math?  Consider taking up coding as a hobby.  For starters, think about using codeacademy, a free interactive website that teaches coding to coding novices—those who might want to try it, but are a bit unsure.  Having coding as a hobby has a myriad of benefits, perhaps the most obvious being your ability to handcraft your own website.  Thinking about starting your own business?  Just looking to have a better understanding of how technology shapes your world?  Try coding and transfer your love of languages and math into code—and a potential career. 

 

4. Meditation

Unplug.  In Richard Davidson’s The Mind’s Own Physician, he chronicles a study of meditation with the Dalai Lama.  His findings?  When the Dalai Lama and other monks were directed to meditate and focus specifically on compassion, their brain waves reflected a “deeply compassionate” state of mind.  Can we train our brains to feel what we want to feel whenever we want to feel it?  Want to feel powerful right before trying out for a play?  Want to feel more confident in an interview?  Want to feel less stressed out all the time?  Try meditation.  “Ommmm.”

 

5. Knitting

Get hooked.  Calm your mind—and have tangible work to show for it.  It has the same benefits of meditation, once you get the hang out it.  Zone out.  Use muscle memory, and then wrap yourself in the result.  Have a touch of the winter blues?  Knit.  Experts say that crafting—in any form—can help de-clutter your brain, stave off anxiety, and give you a general sense of well-being.  Added benefit?  Knitting needles and a ball of yarn fit in your backpack easily.  Knitting’s portability allows you to re-charge and re-engage your brain. 

 

6. Learning a New Language

¡Hola! Bonjour.  Heia.  Bongiorno.  Guten tag.  Ni hao.  Dobroe utro.  Boost your brainpower.  Improve your memory.  Make better decisions.  Multi-task effectively.  Not only will you learn a new language, you’ll be learning with other people in the same boat as you—adventurous.  Like to travel?  It’s always good to know at least a few additional words or phrases when you say “hello” and “thank you.”  Planning on working for an international company?  Plan on speaking at least one other language.  

Finding a hobby not only will make you a better student, it will make you a better person.  Find the time to do something new—and you might just find a new passion. 

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Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[db_lead] =>

Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[text] =>

Engage your brain.  Pushing the boundaries of your comfort zone pushes you to become a better person.  Meet people you wouldn’t otherwise meet.  Question and challenge yourself. Cultivate a new skill.  Sign up and show up.  Take a break from what you “do” and try something new. Be who you are, not what you do.  Here are six possibilities for hobbies that we think will turn on your brain—and maybe even your career.

 

1. Music & Dance

Not only can listening to music and dancing reduce your stress levels, but they increase your levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in your brain that is linked to feelings of well-being.  Love pop?  Try classical.  Have you always admired hip-hop?  Join an on-campus group.   Tap dancing?  Tappity-tap away.  Want to play the kazoo?  Do it.  You’ll meet people who have the talent and skill that you admire—and you’ll also meet people who are open-minded and willing to try new things.  Just like you.

 

2. Photography

Slow down and de-stress by capturing a moment in time.  Just one.  Focus on it.  Capture dew drops on a blade of grass.  An icicle that formed overnight.  A child’s smile.  A honeybee on a sunflower. Photography reduces your stress level and encourages you to focus, visually, on something other than you do all the time.  Who knows?  It could even lead to a career decision.  Consider Dr. Pauley Chea.  When he was a med student at the University of Connecticut, he thought he wanted to study emergency medicine. He also loved photography.  Guess what he does now?  He’s a radiologist.  Translate your passion into your career.    

 

3. Coding

Like learning new languages?  Reading music?  Love math?  Consider taking up coding as a hobby.  For starters, think about using codeacademy, a free interactive website that teaches coding to coding novices—those who might want to try it, but are a bit unsure.  Having coding as a hobby has a myriad of benefits, perhaps the most obvious being your ability to handcraft your own website.  Thinking about starting your own business?  Just looking to have a better understanding of how technology shapes your world?  Try coding and transfer your love of languages and math into code—and a potential career. 

 

4. Meditation

Unplug.  In Richard Davidson’s The Mind’s Own Physician, he chronicles a study of meditation with the Dalai Lama.  His findings?  When the Dalai Lama and other monks were directed to meditate and focus specifically on compassion, their brain waves reflected a “deeply compassionate” state of mind.  Can we train our brains to feel what we want to feel whenever we want to feel it?  Want to feel powerful right before trying out for a play?  Want to feel more confident in an interview?  Want to feel less stressed out all the time?  Try meditation.  “Ommmm.”

 

5. Knitting

Get hooked.  Calm your mind—and have tangible work to show for it.  It has the same benefits of meditation, once you get the hang out it.  Zone out.  Use muscle memory, and then wrap yourself in the result.  Have a touch of the winter blues?  Knit.  Experts say that crafting—in any form—can help de-clutter your brain, stave off anxiety, and give you a general sense of well-being.  Added benefit?  Knitting needles and a ball of yarn fit in your backpack easily.  Knitting’s portability allows you to re-charge and re-engage your brain. 

 

6. Learning a New Language

¡Hola! Bonjour.  Heia.  Bongiorno.  Guten tag.  Ni hao.  Dobroe utro.  Boost your brainpower.  Improve your memory.  Make better decisions.  Multi-task effectively.  Not only will you learn a new language, you’ll be learning with other people in the same boat as you—adventurous.  Like to travel?  It’s always good to know at least a few additional words or phrases when you say “hello” and “thank you.”  Planning on working for an international company?  Plan on speaking at least one other language.  

Finding a hobby not only will make you a better student, it will make you a better person.  Find the time to do something new—and you might just find a new passion. 

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Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[text] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

Social Media Do’s for College Applicants

1. Set your accounts to private.

By changing your settings to private, you control who sees your posts, shares, photos and other content. In most social media outlets, this also means your name won’t come up in web search results.

Keep in mind, however, that some college marketers are now reaching out to candidates via Facebook. If you reply to a school via social media, they may be able to view some or all of your account information so proceed with caution if you haven’t yet reviewed your page.

 

2. Be a positive presence.

Refraining from posting questionable photos is a no-brainer, but there are also plenty of proactive ways to establish a powerful social media presence you actually want college admissions officers to see.

Even if your profile is set to private, sites like Facebook give you the option to allow the public to see certain content. Posting about something which reflects positively on you as a candidate, such as winning an award, volunteering in your community, or demonstrating interest in an academically relevant field? Making these types of post public lets you showcase your best self to admissions officers. In fact, just as a third of admissions officers were negatively influenced by content about applicants on social media, an equal amount were positively influenced by what they discovered.

One last thing to keep in mind? Be sure to proofread everything you post. Even news of the most amazing accomplishment can be sullied by careless spelling and grammar errors.

 

3. Google yourself.

The internet is increasingly pervasive and has a very long memory. How can you possible take control of your social media presence if you don’t know what’s out there? The good news is that in most cases, nothing harmless will turn up.

But even if you do have skeletons in your closet which have somehow made their way online, knowing about them is a huge part of fixing the problem. By creating more positive content that will come up in internet searches, you can potentially mitigate the damage. So go ahead and get started on that blog, personal website or professional LinkedIn page.

Social Media Don’ts for College Applicants

1. Failure to curb your lack of enthusiasm.

Potential damage to your online reputation isn’t limited to what you post on your own pages. If you post on other public forums using your same username or email address, these may come up during a search. One simple rule of thumb? If it’s negative, keep it offline. 

On the flip side, contributing insightful comments to an online conversation demonstrating your passion for and knowledge of a particular subject can help you present yourself as a candidate positioned to make a meaningful contribution to a campus community. 

 

2. Avoiding social media entirely.

So afraid of the potential harm social media might cause to you that you’re avoiding the whole darn thing? Not only is this likely to confound admissions officers and lead them to believe you might have something to hide, but it’s also a major missed opportunity. After all, admissions officers aren’t exclusively looking for problems; they’re also looking for evidence that you’re a worthy candidate. Give them what they’re looking for is by prioritizing the establishment of a strong social media presence.

 

3. Posting the wrong pictures.

You’re probably already aware that no matter how fun that party was, red Solo cups have no place on social media. Not sure whether or not a photo is Facebook-friendly? One popular approach to posting photos on social media suggests subscribing to the “grandma test.” Its gist? If you wouldn’t show it to your grandmother, it doesn’t belong on Facebook.

But many college applicants overlook the fact that the “Grandma test” is actually a two-parter. In addition to avoiding pictures you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see, also consider the ones that would meet her approval -- you know, the photos showing you as a happy, engaged and social person. These pictures represent exactly the sort of students colleges want to see on their campuses.

The overall takeaway? While social media often gets a bad rap when it comes to the college admissions process, a carefully cultivated social media presence can actually be more boon than bust.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Social Media,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-15 17:07:14,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 50,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[db_lead] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[text] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

Social Media Do’s for College Applicants

1. Set your accounts to private.

By changing your settings to private, you control who sees your posts, shares, photos and other content. In most social media outlets, this also means your name won’t come up in web search results.

Keep in mind, however, that some college marketers are now reaching out to candidates via Facebook. If you reply to a school via social media, they may be able to view some or all of your account information so proceed with caution if you haven’t yet reviewed your page.

 

2. Be a positive presence.

Refraining from posting questionable photos is a no-brainer, but there are also plenty of proactive ways to establish a powerful social media presence you actually want college admissions officers to see.

Even if your profile is set to private, sites like Facebook give you the option to allow the public to see certain content. Posting about something which reflects positively on you as a candidate, such as winning an award, volunteering in your community, or demonstrating interest in an academically relevant field? Making these types of post public lets you showcase your best self to admissions officers. In fact, just as a third of admissions officers were negatively influenced by content about applicants on social media, an equal amount were positively influenced by what they discovered.

One last thing to keep in mind? Be sure to proofread everything you post. Even news of the most amazing accomplishment can be sullied by careless spelling and grammar errors.

 

3. Google yourself.

The internet is increasingly pervasive and has a very long memory. How can you possible take control of your social media presence if you don’t know what’s out there? The good news is that in most cases, nothing harmless will turn up.

But even if you do have skeletons in your closet which have somehow made their way online, knowing about them is a huge part of fixing the problem. By creating more positive content that will come up in internet searches, you can potentially mitigate the damage. So go ahead and get started on that blog, personal website or professional LinkedIn page.

Social Media Don’ts for College Applicants

1. Failure to curb your lack of enthusiasm.

Potential damage to your online reputation isn’t limited to what you post on your own pages. If you post on other public forums using your same username or email address, these may come up during a search. One simple rule of thumb? If it’s negative, keep it offline. 

On the flip side, contributing insightful comments to an online conversation demonstrating your passion for and knowledge of a particular subject can help you present yourself as a candidate positioned to make a meaningful contribution to a campus community. 

 

2. Avoiding social media entirely.

So afraid of the potential harm social media might cause to you that you’re avoiding the whole darn thing? Not only is this likely to confound admissions officers and lead them to believe you might have something to hide, but it’s also a major missed opportunity. After all, admissions officers aren’t exclusively looking for problems; they’re also looking for evidence that you’re a worthy candidate. Give them what they’re looking for is by prioritizing the establishment of a strong social media presence.

 

3. Posting the wrong pictures.

You’re probably already aware that no matter how fun that party was, red Solo cups have no place on social media. Not sure whether or not a photo is Facebook-friendly? One popular approach to posting photos on social media suggests subscribing to the “grandma test.” Its gist? If you wouldn’t show it to your grandmother, it doesn’t belong on Facebook.

But many college applicants overlook the fact that the “Grandma test” is actually a two-parter. In addition to avoiding pictures you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see, also consider the ones that would meet her approval -- you know, the photos showing you as a happy, engaged and social person. These pictures represent exactly the sort of students colleges want to see on their campuses.

The overall takeaway? While social media often gets a bad rap when it comes to the college admissions process, a carefully cultivated social media presence can actually be more boon than bust.

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Over {number:programs} Bachelors Programs globally),[second_nav_items] => Array ([0] => Array ([title] => Bachelor's Degrees,[active] => 1,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Bachelor/),[1] => Array ([title] => Bachelor of Science,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BSc/),[2] => Array ([title] => Bachelor of Arts,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BA/),[3] => Array ([title] => Business Administration,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/BBA/),[4] => Array ([title] => Online Bachelor Degrees,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Online-Degrees/),[5] => Array ([title] => Universities by Country,[active] => ,[url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/universities/)),[footer_links] => Array ([0] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/About-Us.html,[title] => About us),[1] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Contact-us.html,[title] => Contact us),[2] => Array ([url] => http://keystoneacademic.com/,[title] => Keystone Academic Solutions),[3] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Terms-and-Conditions.html,[title] => Terms and Conditions),[4] => Array ([url] => http://www.bachelorstudies.com/Schools_and_Universities/Privacy-policy.html,[title] => Privacy),[5] => Array ([url] => /sitemap/,[title] => Sitemap)),[listingNews_aside] => Array ([0] => News Object ([] => International Numbers Top 1 Million in the US,[] => en,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => 1,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => ,[] => 1,[] => Array (),[] => 1262,[] => Array ([idNews] => 1262,[idUser] => 45,[idUserLog] => 2325,[idType] => 50,[idProvider] => 0,[active] => Yes,[show_title] => Yes,[show_lead] => No,[show_link] => No,[created_at] => 2016-12-05 15:21:32,[updated_at] => 2016-12-05 15:21:32,[start_at] => 2016-12-05 00:00:00,[end_at] => 2037-12-31 00:00:00,[random] => 75a87fa4,[internal_notes] => ,[news_type] => news,[idThumbnail] => 35348,[idNewsPhoto] => 0,[conference_start_at] => ,[idregion] => 0,[idLanguage] => en,[url_path] => International-Numbers-Top-1-Million-in-the-US,[head_title] => ,[title] => International Numbers Top 1 Million in the US,[lead] =>

Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[text] =>

The results are in from the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Open Doors report, and the news is positive.  The number of international students in the US in 2015-2016 topped one million students for the first time—and that’s only 5 percent of the number of students pursuing higher education in the country.  First-time enrollments of international students increased by 2.4 percent since 2015, but those who enrolled in intensive English programs fell by 14.6 percent.

Students from China made up the largest percentage of international students in the US at 31. 5 percent, closely followed by India, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea

More than one-third of these students are studying engineering, math, or computer science, and about 14 percent are involved in STEM-related coursework.  Why?  The IIE suggests the growth of STEM students is probably related to the 25 percent increase in students from India—more than 75 percent of students from India who study in the US study STEM.

While many international students choose to study in the US, many US students are just beginning to realize the benefits of studying abroad.  IIE’s President, Allan Goodman reports, “Studying abroad is one of the best ways to prepare to enter and succeed in the interconnected, globalized workforce, yet 90 percent of American college students do not study or intern outside of the United States. We owe it to the next generation of Americans to find ways to make it more accessible to a wider range of students.”  He added, “Some U.S. students studying in STEM fields had found it challenging to study abroad. But this is changing, and global experience is increasingly crucial to success in all fields.

Concerns?  The Open Doors report reflects 10 years straight of growth in the number of international students on US campuses.  While this is good news, there’s concern in the US and the international community about the potentially deleterious effects of a Trump presidency.    

Learn more about studying in the US.    

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Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[db_lead] =>

Over 1 million international students studied in the US in 2015-2016, according to the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report, the largest number in history.  Learn more about where they’re from, what they’re studying, and the potential for the future.   

,[text] =>

The results are in from the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Open Doors report, and the news is positive.  The number of international students in the US in 2015-2016 topped one million students for the first time—and that’s only 5 percent of the number of students pursuing higher education in the country.  First-time enrollments of international students increased by 2.4 percent since 2015, but those who enrolled in intensive English programs fell by 14.6 percent.

Students from China made up the largest percentage of international students in the US at 31. 5 percent, closely followed by India, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea

More than one-third of these students are studying engineering, math, or computer science, and about 14 percent are involved in STEM-related coursework.  Why?  The IIE suggests the growth of STEM students is probably related to the 25 percent increase in students from India—more than 75 percent of students from India who study in the US study STEM.

While many international students choose to study in the US, many US students are just beginning to realize the benefits of studying abroad.  IIE’s President, Allan Goodman reports, “Studying abroad is one of the best ways to prepare to enter and succeed in the interconnected, globalized workforce, yet 90 percent of American college students do not study or intern outside of the United States. We owe it to the next generation of Americans to find ways to make it more accessible to a wider range of students.”  He added, “Some U.S. students studying in STEM fields had found it challenging to study abroad. But this is changing, and global experience is increasingly crucial to success in all fields.

Concerns?  The Open Doors report reflects 10 years straight of growth in the number of international students on US campuses.  While this is good news, there’s concern in the US and the international community about the potentially deleterious effects of a Trump presidency.    

Learn more about studying in the US.    

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A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[text] =>

Education Malta, a non-profit, public-private partnership between the government and the Chamber of Commerce, recently launched a new campaign to attract educational institutions to the island nation of just over 400,000 residents.  This is in direct response to the Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 call for an entity to promote educational investments.                

Education Minister Evarist Bartolo reported in Malta Today that international education institutions wanted to establish a presence on the island to attract international students.  “Malta should endeavor to attract quality institutions,” he said.  “Education Malta should complement the Government Ministry for Education and Employment as the legislator, while the National Commission for Further and Higher Education will continue to rigorously see that the set high standards and levels in education are retained.  We will not compromise quality for quantity.”

Education Malta’s chairman, Charles Zammit, focused on the public-private aspect of the initiative.  He reportedly said, “We are going out to the market as both the private sector and the public sector.  So I think that should be more effective.”

Malta already has an international presence with branch campuses from the UK’s University of Middlesex, Barts, and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.  Zammit also added, “We have a very good brand in English language teaching which we have been building up for the past 25 years, and I think that brand can help us to promote Malta to a wider [segment] of the education sector.”

Where will the new campaign focus its efforts?  Primarily Europe and the Middle East. 

Learn more about studying in Malta.

 

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A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[db_lead] =>

A joint partnership between the Maltese government and the Chamber of Commerce will launch a new campaign—Education Malta—to attract more educational institutions to the country.  Learn more.

,[text] =>

Education Malta, a non-profit, public-private partnership between the government and the Chamber of Commerce, recently launched a new campaign to attract educational institutions to the island nation of just over 400,000 residents.  This is in direct response to the Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 call for an entity to promote educational investments.                

Education Minister Evarist Bartolo reported in Malta Today that international education institutions wanted to establish a presence on the island to attract international students.  “Malta should endeavor to attract quality institutions,” he said.  “Education Malta should complement the Government Ministry for Education and Employment as the legislator, while the National Commission for Further and Higher Education will continue to rigorously see that the set high standards and levels in education are retained.  We will not compromise quality for quantity.”

Education Malta’s chairman, Charles Zammit, focused on the public-private aspect of the initiative.  He reportedly said, “We are going out to the market as both the private sector and the public sector.  So I think that should be more effective.”

Malta already has an international presence with branch campuses from the UK’s University of Middlesex, Barts, and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.  Zammit also added, “We have a very good brand in English language teaching which we have been building up for the past 25 years, and I think that brand can help us to promote Malta to a wider [segment] of the education sector.”

Where will the new campaign focus its efforts?  Primarily Europe and the Middle East. 

Learn more about studying in Malta.

 

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In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[text] =>

With three out of ten of the world’s top universities in the UK, it’s no surprise that the UK draws significant numbers of international students.  What are the benefits of studying in the UK?  A new campaign that promotes the UK as a study destination and an option for transnational education aims to show students exactly what those benefits are.  The £6 million Study UK Discover You campaign, half funded by the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign, and matched by The British Council, aims to “inspire” international students to recognize that an education in the UK will lead to knowledge, confidence, and necessary skills for success in the 21st century.                      

The website for the campaign has information relevant to higher education and transnational opportunities for international students, in addition practical advice regarding British culture, English language education, visas, scholarships, financing, accommodations, holidays, festivals, events, and student testimonials from international students who have studied in the UK. 

Why now?  The Higher Education Statistics Agency recently reported that 665,000 students studied offshore for a degree in the UK during 2014-2015.  And that number is rising.  Jacqueline Jenkins, senior advisor of education management at the British Council, reported, “[It’s] not just to encourage more international students to study in the UK.”  She said, “It’s also to encourage more international students to take up UK courses and qualifications overseas.”

Their target audiences?  China, India, and Malaysia to start.  Jenkins said that the campaign will start by using social media to make its presence known, and then expand its strategies—and its marketing focus—after the launch. 

Learn more about studying in the UK.

 

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In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[db_lead] =>

In partnership with The British Council, the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign recently launched a new campaign and website to attract international students and to educate students about transnational education study opportunities.  Find out about what they’re offering and why.

,[text] =>

With three out of ten of the world’s top universities in the UK, it’s no surprise that the UK draws significant numbers of international students.  What are the benefits of studying in the UK?  A new campaign that promotes the UK as a study destination and an option for transnational education aims to show students exactly what those benefits are.  The £6 million Study UK Discover You campaign, half funded by the UK government’s GREAT Britain Campaign, and matched by The British Council, aims to “inspire” international students to recognize that an education in the UK will lead to knowledge, confidence, and necessary skills for success in the 21st century.                      

The website for the campaign has information relevant to higher education and transnational opportunities for international students, in addition practical advice regarding British culture, English language education, visas, scholarships, financing, accommodations, holidays, festivals, events, and student testimonials from international students who have studied in the UK. 

Why now?  The Higher Education Statistics Agency recently reported that 665,000 students studied offshore for a degree in the UK during 2014-2015.  And that number is rising.  Jacqueline Jenkins, senior advisor of education management at the British Council, reported, “[It’s] not just to encourage more international students to study in the UK.”  She said, “It’s also to encourage more international students to take up UK courses and qualifications overseas.”

Their target audiences?  China, India, and Malaysia to start.  Jenkins said that the campaign will start by using social media to make its presence known, and then expand its strategies—and its marketing focus—after the launch. 

Learn more about studying in the UK.

 

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In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[text] =>

Everyone knows: research is important.  As an undergraduate, working on research can help you with graduate plans and future career moves.  If you want to do research as an undergraduate, you don’t necessarily need to study at a research university though.  In fact, it might be more difficult to do research at a research university as an undergraduate.  Why?  Research universities often focus on graduate students for research, not undergrads.  If you want to do research, and you’re an undergrad, consider these ideas. 

 

Get involved: Volunteer

It’s not enough to have great grades.  You need to get involved wherever you are.  How do you do this?  You volunteer.  Figure out which department interests you the most by taking classes, talking to your classmates, or visiting with a few professors.  Offer to volunteer with a faculty member on a research project. 

Can you just offer to volunteer?  Yes.  And no.  Think about the professors with whom you might want to work.  If you don’t know where to start, talk to your classmates—with whom are they taking classes?  Which professors do they like?  Which ones do you like?  Does the professor have an established reputation in the field of your interest? 

Contact them.  Visit during office hours—or even better, make an appointment and explain the purpose of the appointment.  Bring your CV or resume—and dress nicely.  No scrubby jeans or pajama bottoms.  You don’t need to go overboard, but mind your appearance.  Express interest in the research—or ask questions about what the research the professor is currently doing.  Ask—are they looking for volunteers?  Explain why you’re interested.  Most important?  Establish positive rapport.  If your request doesn’t go so well, chalk it up to experience.  If it goes well, congratulations!  You have an undergraduate research position!  If it goes well, but you don’t have a research position?  Don’t worry.  You’ve made a positive impression on faculty at your school—and you’ve built confidence in moving forward. 

 

Check out undergrad research programs

What can you do if there are no opportunities on your campus, or you’ve tried and it’s not working out?  Consider volunteering or interning outside your university.  Hospitals and medical centers often seek undergraduate research volunteers, in addition to private industries, or community-based organizations.  In bigger cities, undergraduates have more options—your university might even have a volunteer office.  The best strategy?  Talk to professors whose work interests you—and have them help you find opportunities either on-campus or off. 

What do you need to do?  Find the people who can help you, express interest, be polite, and go from there.  If you have no idea where to start, don’t know which professors to ask, start with your campus career office.  Private businesses and companies will often post research opportunities with your career office—or pertinent department.

The key is to be open to opportunities—and to be willing to talk to people who can and want to help you. 

 

Try a small college

Sometimes, smaller is better.  They’re not “R1” universities with world-class research facilities—but they are small schools with faculty focused on teaching.  An outstanding teacher will recognize the need for research opportunities.  You may just get more attention from faculty who want to see you succeed at a smaller, more student-focused school than you will at a bigger “R1” school.  Sure, there may be less funding at smaller schools, but you may just find the perfect opportunity to focus on research that interests you—with incredible faculty support.  Think about this option as a “quality v. quantity” problem. 

There’s potentially more of a need for help with research at smaller schools too—which translates to more opportunity for you.  For most faculty at smaller colleges, teaching comes first, research comes second.  Teaching professors are often looking for help—and a curious undergraduate seeking research experience is often one of the best options.  It’s win-win for professors and for you. 

Your takeaway?  Do your homework.  Talk to people.  Be curious and unfailingly polite. Always work hard and do your best. 

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In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[db_lead] =>

In the academically competitive world of research, you might not see how you—as an undergraduate student—can compete.  But you can—and should.  Let’s take a closer look at how to get involved in research as an undergraduate. 

,[text] =>

Everyone knows: research is important.  As an undergraduate, working on research can help you with graduate plans and future career moves.  If you want to do research as an undergraduate, you don’t necessarily need to study at a research university though.  In fact, it might be more difficult to do research at a research university as an undergraduate.  Why?  Research universities often focus on graduate students for research, not undergrads.  If you want to do research, and you’re an undergrad, consider these ideas. 

 

Get involved: Volunteer

It’s not enough to have great grades.  You need to get involved wherever you are.  How do you do this?  You volunteer.  Figure out which department interests you the most by taking classes, talking to your classmates, or visiting with a few professors.  Offer to volunteer with a faculty member on a research project. 

Can you just offer to volunteer?  Yes.  And no.  Think about the professors with whom you might want to work.  If you don’t know where to start, talk to your classmates—with whom are they taking classes?  Which professors do they like?  Which ones do you like?  Does the professor have an established reputation in the field of your interest? 

Contact them.  Visit during office hours—or even better, make an appointment and explain the purpose of the appointment.  Bring your CV or resume—and dress nicely.  No scrubby jeans or pajama bottoms.  You don’t need to go overboard, but mind your appearance.  Express interest in the research—or ask questions about what the research the professor is currently doing.  Ask—are they looking for volunteers?  Explain why you’re interested.  Most important?  Establish positive rapport.  If your request doesn’t go so well, chalk it up to experience.  If it goes well, congratulations!  You have an undergraduate research position!  If it goes well, but you don’t have a research position?  Don’t worry.  You’ve made a positive impression on faculty at your school—and you’ve built confidence in moving forward. 

 

Check out undergrad research programs

What can you do if there are no opportunities on your campus, or you’ve tried and it’s not working out?  Consider volunteering or interning outside your university.  Hospitals and medical centers often seek undergraduate research volunteers, in addition to private industries, or community-based organizations.  In bigger cities, undergraduates have more options—your university might even have a volunteer office.  The best strategy?  Talk to professors whose work interests you—and have them help you find opportunities either on-campus or off. 

What do you need to do?  Find the people who can help you, express interest, be polite, and go from there.  If you have no idea where to start, don’t know which professors to ask, start with your campus career office.  Private businesses and companies will often post research opportunities with your career office—or pertinent department.

The key is to be open to opportunities—and to be willing to talk to people who can and want to help you. 

 

Try a small college

Sometimes, smaller is better.  They’re not “R1” universities with world-class research facilities—but they are small schools with faculty focused on teaching.  An outstanding teacher will recognize the need for research opportunities.  You may just get more attention from faculty who want to see you succeed at a smaller, more student-focused school than you will at a bigger “R1” school.  Sure, there may be less funding at smaller schools, but you may just find the perfect opportunity to focus on research that interests you—with incredible faculty support.  Think about this option as a “quality v. quantity” problem. 

There’s potentially more of a need for help with research at smaller schools too—which translates to more opportunity for you.  For most faculty at smaller colleges, teaching comes first, research comes second.  Teaching professors are often looking for help—and a curious undergraduate seeking research experience is often one of the best options.  It’s win-win for professors and for you. 

Your takeaway?  Do your homework.  Talk to people.  Be curious and unfailingly polite. Always work hard and do your best. 

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Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[text] =>

Engage your brain.  Pushing the boundaries of your comfort zone pushes you to become a better person.  Meet people you wouldn’t otherwise meet.  Question and challenge yourself. Cultivate a new skill.  Sign up and show up.  Take a break from what you “do” and try something new. Be who you are, not what you do.  Here are six possibilities for hobbies that we think will turn on your brain—and maybe even your career.

 

1. Music & Dance

Not only can listening to music and dancing reduce your stress levels, but they increase your levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in your brain that is linked to feelings of well-being.  Love pop?  Try classical.  Have you always admired hip-hop?  Join an on-campus group.   Tap dancing?  Tappity-tap away.  Want to play the kazoo?  Do it.  You’ll meet people who have the talent and skill that you admire—and you’ll also meet people who are open-minded and willing to try new things.  Just like you.

 

2. Photography

Slow down and de-stress by capturing a moment in time.  Just one.  Focus on it.  Capture dew drops on a blade of grass.  An icicle that formed overnight.  A child’s smile.  A honeybee on a sunflower. Photography reduces your stress level and encourages you to focus, visually, on something other than you do all the time.  Who knows?  It could even lead to a career decision.  Consider Dr. Pauley Chea.  When he was a med student at the University of Connecticut, he thought he wanted to study emergency medicine. He also loved photography.  Guess what he does now?  He’s a radiologist.  Translate your passion into your career.    

 

3. Coding

Like learning new languages?  Reading music?  Love math?  Consider taking up coding as a hobby.  For starters, think about using codeacademy, a free interactive website that teaches coding to coding novices—those who might want to try it, but are a bit unsure.  Having coding as a hobby has a myriad of benefits, perhaps the most obvious being your ability to handcraft your own website.  Thinking about starting your own business?  Just looking to have a better understanding of how technology shapes your world?  Try coding and transfer your love of languages and math into code—and a potential career. 

 

4. Meditation

Unplug.  In Richard Davidson’s The Mind’s Own Physician, he chronicles a study of meditation with the Dalai Lama.  His findings?  When the Dalai Lama and other monks were directed to meditate and focus specifically on compassion, their brain waves reflected a “deeply compassionate” state of mind.  Can we train our brains to feel what we want to feel whenever we want to feel it?  Want to feel powerful right before trying out for a play?  Want to feel more confident in an interview?  Want to feel less stressed out all the time?  Try meditation.  “Ommmm.”

 

5. Knitting

Get hooked.  Calm your mind—and have tangible work to show for it.  It has the same benefits of meditation, once you get the hang out it.  Zone out.  Use muscle memory, and then wrap yourself in the result.  Have a touch of the winter blues?  Knit.  Experts say that crafting—in any form—can help de-clutter your brain, stave off anxiety, and give you a general sense of well-being.  Added benefit?  Knitting needles and a ball of yarn fit in your backpack easily.  Knitting’s portability allows you to re-charge and re-engage your brain. 

 

6. Learning a New Language

¡Hola! Bonjour.  Heia.  Bongiorno.  Guten tag.  Ni hao.  Dobroe utro.  Boost your brainpower.  Improve your memory.  Make better decisions.  Multi-task effectively.  Not only will you learn a new language, you’ll be learning with other people in the same boat as you—adventurous.  Like to travel?  It’s always good to know at least a few additional words or phrases when you say “hello” and “thank you.”  Planning on working for an international company?  Plan on speaking at least one other language.  

Finding a hobby not only will make you a better student, it will make you a better person.  Find the time to do something new—and you might just find a new passion. 

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Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[db_lead] =>

Learning happens when you push yourself to try new things.  Think about something in a new way.  Talk to someone you might not otherwise meet.   From tap-dancing to knitting, check out these six possibilities for hobbies that we think will make you a better student—and a better person. 

,[text] =>

Engage your brain.  Pushing the boundaries of your comfort zone pushes you to become a better person.  Meet people you wouldn’t otherwise meet.  Question and challenge yourself. Cultivate a new skill.  Sign up and show up.  Take a break from what you “do” and try something new. Be who you are, not what you do.  Here are six possibilities for hobbies that we think will turn on your brain—and maybe even your career.

 

1. Music & Dance

Not only can listening to music and dancing reduce your stress levels, but they increase your levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in your brain that is linked to feelings of well-being.  Love pop?  Try classical.  Have you always admired hip-hop?  Join an on-campus group.   Tap dancing?  Tappity-tap away.  Want to play the kazoo?  Do it.  You’ll meet people who have the talent and skill that you admire—and you’ll also meet people who are open-minded and willing to try new things.  Just like you.

 

2. Photography

Slow down and de-stress by capturing a moment in time.  Just one.  Focus on it.  Capture dew drops on a blade of grass.  An icicle that formed overnight.  A child’s smile.  A honeybee on a sunflower. Photography reduces your stress level and encourages you to focus, visually, on something other than you do all the time.  Who knows?  It could even lead to a career decision.  Consider Dr. Pauley Chea.  When he was a med student at the University of Connecticut, he thought he wanted to study emergency medicine. He also loved photography.  Guess what he does now?  He’s a radiologist.  Translate your passion into your career.    

 

3. Coding

Like learning new languages?  Reading music?  Love math?  Consider taking up coding as a hobby.  For starters, think about using codeacademy, a free interactive website that teaches coding to coding novices—those who might want to try it, but are a bit unsure.  Having coding as a hobby has a myriad of benefits, perhaps the most obvious being your ability to handcraft your own website.  Thinking about starting your own business?  Just looking to have a better understanding of how technology shapes your world?  Try coding and transfer your love of languages and math into code—and a potential career. 

 

4. Meditation

Unplug.  In Richard Davidson’s The Mind’s Own Physician, he chronicles a study of meditation with the Dalai Lama.  His findings?  When the Dalai Lama and other monks were directed to meditate and focus specifically on compassion, their brain waves reflected a “deeply compassionate” state of mind.  Can we train our brains to feel what we want to feel whenever we want to feel it?  Want to feel powerful right before trying out for a play?  Want to feel more confident in an interview?  Want to feel less stressed out all the time?  Try meditation.  “Ommmm.”

 

5. Knitting

Get hooked.  Calm your mind—and have tangible work to show for it.  It has the same benefits of meditation, once you get the hang out it.  Zone out.  Use muscle memory, and then wrap yourself in the result.  Have a touch of the winter blues?  Knit.  Experts say that crafting—in any form—can help de-clutter your brain, stave off anxiety, and give you a general sense of well-being.  Added benefit?  Knitting needles and a ball of yarn fit in your backpack easily.  Knitting’s portability allows you to re-charge and re-engage your brain. 

 

6. Learning a New Language

¡Hola! Bonjour.  Heia.  Bongiorno.  Guten tag.  Ni hao.  Dobroe utro.  Boost your brainpower.  Improve your memory.  Make better decisions.  Multi-task effectively.  Not only will you learn a new language, you’ll be learning with other people in the same boat as you—adventurous.  Like to travel?  It’s always good to know at least a few additional words or phrases when you say “hello” and “thank you.”  Planning on working for an international company?  Plan on speaking at least one other language.  

Finding a hobby not only will make you a better student, it will make you a better person.  Find the time to do something new—and you might just find a new passion. 

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Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[text] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

Social Media Do’s for College Applicants

1. Set your accounts to private.

By changing your settings to private, you control who sees your posts, shares, photos and other content. In most social media outlets, this also means your name won’t come up in web search results.

Keep in mind, however, that some college marketers are now reaching out to candidates via Facebook. If you reply to a school via social media, they may be able to view some or all of your account information so proceed with caution if you haven’t yet reviewed your page.

 

2. Be a positive presence.

Refraining from posting questionable photos is a no-brainer, but there are also plenty of proactive ways to establish a powerful social media presence you actually want college admissions officers to see.

Even if your profile is set to private, sites like Facebook give you the option to allow the public to see certain content. Posting about something which reflects positively on you as a candidate, such as winning an award, volunteering in your community, or demonstrating interest in an academically relevant field? Making these types of post public lets you showcase your best self to admissions officers. In fact, just as a third of admissions officers were negatively influenced by content about applicants on social media, an equal amount were positively influenced by what they discovered.

One last thing to keep in mind? Be sure to proofread everything you post. Even news of the most amazing accomplishment can be sullied by careless spelling and grammar errors.

 

3. Google yourself.

The internet is increasingly pervasive and has a very long memory. How can you possible take control of your social media presence if you don’t know what’s out there? The good news is that in most cases, nothing harmless will turn up.

But even if you do have skeletons in your closet which have somehow made their way online, knowing about them is a huge part of fixing the problem. By creating more positive content that will come up in internet searches, you can potentially mitigate the damage. So go ahead and get started on that blog, personal website or professional LinkedIn page.

Social Media Don’ts for College Applicants

1. Failure to curb your lack of enthusiasm.

Potential damage to your online reputation isn’t limited to what you post on your own pages. If you post on other public forums using your same username or email address, these may come up during a search. One simple rule of thumb? If it’s negative, keep it offline. 

On the flip side, contributing insightful comments to an online conversation demonstrating your passion for and knowledge of a particular subject can help you present yourself as a candidate positioned to make a meaningful contribution to a campus community. 

 

2. Avoiding social media entirely.

So afraid of the potential harm social media might cause to you that you’re avoiding the whole darn thing? Not only is this likely to confound admissions officers and lead them to believe you might have something to hide, but it’s also a major missed opportunity. After all, admissions officers aren’t exclusively looking for problems; they’re also looking for evidence that you’re a worthy candidate. Give them what they’re looking for is by prioritizing the establishment of a strong social media presence.

 

3. Posting the wrong pictures.

You’re probably already aware that no matter how fun that party was, red Solo cups have no place on social media. Not sure whether or not a photo is Facebook-friendly? One popular approach to posting photos on social media suggests subscribing to the “grandma test.” Its gist? If you wouldn’t show it to your grandmother, it doesn’t belong on Facebook.

But many college applicants overlook the fact that the “Grandma test” is actually a two-parter. In addition to avoiding pictures you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see, also consider the ones that would meet her approval -- you know, the photos showing you as a happy, engaged and social person. These pictures represent exactly the sort of students colleges want to see on their campuses.

The overall takeaway? While social media often gets a bad rap when it comes to the college admissions process, a carefully cultivated social media presence can actually be more boon than bust.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Social Media,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-15 17:07:14,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 50,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[db_lead] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

,[text] =>

Think only your friends are looking at your Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat posts? Think again. According to the results of a recent survey from Kaplan Test Prep, a whopping 40 percent of college admissions officers admit to checking out candidates’ social media profiles. Even worse? A full third of respondents revealed that they’d found negative items which detrimentally impacted applicants’ shots at acceptance. 

This doesn’t mean it’s time to pull the plug on all social media. In fact, savvy social media usage can actually be a positive -- with the right strategies in place, that is. Read on for a roundup of do’s and don’ts when it comes to maximizing your social media presence for college admissions success.

Social Media Do’s for College Applicants

1. Set your accounts to private.

By changing your settings to private, you control who sees your posts, shares, photos and other content. In most social media outlets, this also means your name won’t come up in web search results.

Keep in mind, however, that some college marketers are now reaching out to candidates via Facebook. If you reply to a school via social media, they may be able to view some or all of your account information so proceed with caution if you haven’t yet reviewed your page.

 

2. Be a positive presence.

Refraining from posting questionable photos is a no-brainer, but there are also plenty of proactive ways to establish a powerful social media presence you actually want college admissions officers to see.

Even if your profile is set to private, sites like Facebook give you the option to allow the public to see certain content. Posting about something which reflects positively on you as a candidate, such as winning an award, volunteering in your community, or demonstrating interest in an academically relevant field? Making these types of post public lets you showcase your best self to admissions officers. In fact, just as a third of admissions officers were negatively influenced by content about applicants on social media, an equal amount were positively influenced by what they discovered.

One last thing to keep in mind? Be sure to proofread everything you post. Even news of the most amazing accomplishment can be sullied by careless spelling and grammar errors.

 

3. Google yourself.

The internet is increasingly pervasive and has a very long memory. How can you possible take control of your social media presence if you don’t know what’s out there? The good news is that in most cases, nothing harmless will turn up.

But even if you do have skeletons in your closet which have somehow made their way online, knowing about them is a huge part of fixing the problem. By creating more positive content that will come up in internet searches, you can potentially mitigate the damage. So go ahead and get started on that blog, personal website or professional LinkedIn page.

Social Media Don’ts for College Applicants

1. Failure to curb your lack of enthusiasm.

Potential damage to your online reputation isn’t limited to what you post on your own pages. If you post on other public forums using your same username or email address, these may come up during a search. One simple rule of thumb? If it’s negative, keep it offline. 

On the flip side, contributing insightful comments to an online conversation demonstrating your passion for and knowledge of a particular subject can help you present yourself as a candidate positioned to make a meaningful contribution to a campus community. 

 

2. Avoiding social media entirely.

So afraid of the potential harm social media might cause to you that you’re avoiding the whole darn thing? Not only is this likely to confound admissions officers and lead them to believe you might have something to hide, but it’s also a major missed opportunity. After all, admissions officers aren’t exclusively looking for problems; they’re also looking for evidence that you’re a worthy candidate. Give them what they’re looking for is by prioritizing the establishment of a strong social media presence.

 

3. Posting the wrong pictures.

You’re probably already aware that no matter how fun that party was, red Solo cups have no place on social media. Not sure whether or not a photo is Facebook-friendly? One popular approach to posting photos on social media suggests subscribing to the “grandma test.” Its gist? If you wouldn’t show it to your grandmother, it doesn’t belong on Facebook.

But many college applicants overlook the fact that the “Grandma test” is actually a two-parter. In addition to avoiding pictures you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see, also consider the ones that would meet her approval -- you know, the photos showing you as a happy, engaged and social person. These pictures represent exactly the sort of students colleges want to see on their campuses.

The overall takeaway? While social media often gets a bad rap when it comes to the college admissions process, a carefully cultivated social media presence can actually be more boon than bust.

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Bachelor Degree in Arts in Macau in Macau

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Arts

Earning a bachelor's degree is achieved by completing the necessary course of study offered by the college or university you enroll in. Completing this study may take three to seven years depending on where you seek your degree.

If you need to experience the best times in China, then study in Macau. Macau will give you a breathtaking moment as you stay for years in the country through the various levels. You will love the gorgeous features and the terrain of the country.

Macau offers fifteen-year education free of cost to its residents. With 99 percent literacy rate the city boasts of reputed colleges and universities with highly qualified faculty.

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Bachelor in Culinary Arts Management

Institute for Tourism Studies
Campus Full time 4 years August 2017 Macau

The IFT's BA Culinary Arts Programme is new programme designed with the modern hospitality professional in mind. The first cohort of students joined the 4-year course in September 2011 and will graduate in 2015. [+]

Bachelors in Arts in Macau in Macau. Bachelor in Culinary Arts Management The IFT's BA Culinary Arts Programme is new programme designed with the modern hospitality professional in mind. The first cohort of students joined the 4-year course in September 2011 and will graduate in 2015. Whether they intend to pursue a career as a culinary chef; a front of house manager; or an all-round culinary professional, the 4-year course draws on a wide experiential base of proven lecturers and skilled craft technicians. With worldwide experience ranging from 3,4 and 5 star hotels to Michelin restaurants to event venues and the like, the IFT draws on this vast knowledge base to deliver a well-rounded broad-based foundation from which the students can flourish. With this in mind the IFT also promotes links and continually builds bridges with industry in an effort to provide much needed professionals with the potential to practice their craft in some of the finest establishments around the world – and indeed many IFT alumni are in fact doing just that. Lastly, the wide reaching culinary arts skills set taught in this programme by itself would be of little use without a thorough complimentary teaching package that incorporated such essentials as languages; culinary vocabulary; financial planning; management theory; culinary culture; trends in gastronomy; human resources and organisational behaviour; as well as such things as environmental considerations and sustainability issues; legislation; marketing and entrepreneurship. In this regard the IFT's 4 year culinary arts degree course is dedicated to providing students with an unparalleled up-to-date skill set which marks the IFT out as a beacon of educational excellence both within the pan-Asian region and beyond. [-]