Approved official program description for BSc in Anthropology and Law

BSc in Anthropology and Law

London School of Economics and Political Science

BSc in Anthropology and Law

London School of Economics and Political Science

BSc in Anthropology and Law

Social anthropology studies human societies and cultures in a broad comparative perspective. Social anthropologists try to explain the causes of variation in social and cultural behaviour, and also to understand what it means to belong to a cultural group whose values and rules may be very different from those familiar to you. Studying anthropology will provide a framework to help you see what is universal to all human societies and what is variable. The programmes aim to build your capacity to analyse social and political relations and so to engage productively in major debates of today concerning social justice, multiculturalism and the direction of change in today's world.

Social anthropology is not a vocational degree, unless you choose to carry on with research in the subject. But it provides an excellent foundation for many careers. Thus, recent graduates have gone on to work in human rights, journalism, development, medicine and counselling, law, administration of refugees, nursing, teaching, business, theatre and film.


Features of LSE courses


Anthropology degrees across the UK share a common core of cross-cultural study. At LSE we are distinctive in our strengths in the fields of law, human rights, cognition, religious practice, kinship, gender, nationalism and everyday forms of the state.

Our concern with the global south (or 'third world') leads to a serious engagement with issues of development, globalisation, industrialisation and the effects of neoliberalism.

As well as encouraging sympathetic understanding of different cultural practices, we also make a priority the development of the critical faculties of our students. We analyse all forms of information - from texts to films - in ways that will enable you to question received versions of the world. Thus, as a student you will increase your factual understanding of the world, and of the interdependence of different parts of it.

While an anthropology degree is not a vocational training, the skills you develop in reading critically, writing coherently, reasoning effectively and public expression are widely valued by employers.




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Last updated 05.08.2014

Campus based
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Place UK, London
Start date February 2015, September 2015
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